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Full text of "Faculty bulletin / The Pennsylvania State College"

PENN STATE COLLECTION 




OklMatu 
Building 



LIBRARY OF 

THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 

PENN STATE COLLECTION 









v: 




PENN STATE COLLECTION 



pennState 



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UNIVERSITY 
LIBRARIES 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/detate/facultybulletinpv17penn 



Published every Monday dur- 
ing the college year as a means 
of making - official announce- 
ments and presenting items of 
interest to the faculty 

VOLUME I 




Pennsylvania 



State Cone: 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
D. M. Cresswell, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



State College, Pa., October lO, 1921 



NUMBER 1 



PURPOSE OF THE 

"FACULTY BULLETIN" 

The purpose of the Penn State "Fac- 
ulty Bulletin", which will be issued 
weekly during- the college year, is pri- 
marily to fill a long-felt want for a 
simple and regular method of faculty 
communication. It may be regarded in 
the light of a "house organ", and brief- 
ly will contain items of interest to 
every faculty member on the following 
points : 

Official announcements from the 
President's Office, from Deans for their 
schools and from other administrative 
offices. 

Reports of actions by the College 
Senate and Council of Administration. 

Announcements of lectures and meet- 
ings that will be of interest to faculty 
members in general. . 

A calendar of events for each week. 

Personal items concerning faculty 
men and women, what they are doing 
in their work here and in foreign fields. 

It will do away with the expensive 
multigraphed communications that in 
the past have been sent from adminis- 
trative offices. 

It will bring faculty news to faculty 
members first-hand, and will be the 
official means for transmitting all 
necessary information. 

A faculty advisory committee will as- 
sist with the publication of the Bulletin. 
We do not expect to have it perfect 
until everyone is fully acquainted with 
its value as a faculty organ. It will 
need the full cooperation of all, for we 
will depend entirely upon contributions. 
Until further notice, matter to appear 
in the following week's Bulletin should 
be in the hands of the editor not later 
than 11 o'clock each Saturday morning. 
Items should be wlritten and sent by 
mail or messenger to the Faculty Bul- 
letin Editor, Publicity Department, 175 
Old Main. For the sake of accuracy 
and time, we will appreciate your 
avoiding telephone messages, especially 
at the last minute, except for emerg- 
ency purposes. That last hour will be 
a busy one. 

We will need a good bit of material 
for the first few Issues, or until the 
Bulletin is well established. May we 
have YOUR cooperation? 

THE EDITOR. 
o — 

COLLEGE SENATE 

The College Senate held its organiza- 
tion meeting last Thursday evening. 
The purpose and personnel of this body 
will be outlined in a later issue of the 
. Bulletin. 



THE INAUGURATION 

Official headquarters for the confer- 
ence and inauguration activities will 
open on Tuesday in the newspaper 
reading- room in the Library. Pro- 
grams far all events and information 
concerning anything about the week- 
end activities may be obtained there. 

Tluu'gday; 11:00 a. m. — General 
Conference; Auditorium, 12:30 — 'Sec- 
tional Lunches followed by Sectional 
Conferences: Agriculture, luncheon in 
McAllisveir Hall, meeting in Old Chapel; 
Education, bo\uh in McAllister Hall; 
Engineering and Industry, both at Uni- 
versity Club; Industrial Chemistry, 
McAllister Kail and Chemistry build- 
ing; Mining, both at University Club; 
Education for Women, both at Wom- 
en's building. 8:00 p. m. — General Con- 
ference. Auditorium. 

Friday; 9:00 a. m. — Student Para le, 
College Avenue; 10:00, Processional lo 
Auditorium; 10:30, Inauguration ex- 
ercises; 12:30, Inaugural Dinner, Ar- 
mory; 7:00 p. m., Student Inaugural 
and Football Mass Meeting, Auditori- 
um; 8:00, Student Celebration, New 
Beaver Field. 

Saturday; 2:30 p. m. — Football, 
Penn State vs. Lehigh. . 8:00 p. m. — 
Alumni Smoker, Armory. 

Sunday — C/hapdl Speaker, President 
Frederick C. Ferry, Hamilton College. 



The Big Meetings 

General Conferences— Thursday a. 
m., no tickets necessary; Thursday 
evening, doors open at 7:30; Space re- 
served until 8:00 for ticket holders. 
Balance of seats on the principal of 
"first come, first served." 

Friday, Inaugural — Space reserved 
for the procession and holders of tick- 
ets. Doors open 10 o'clock to ticket 
holders. After procession enters, re- 
maining space will be thrown open. 

Inaugural Dinner— Admission by tick- 
et only. A few visitors may hear the 
speaking (beginning about 1:45) from 
the Armory stage and balcony. 

It has been necessary to change the 
meeting place for the Agricultural Con- 
ference from 100 Hort, to Old Chapel. 

The Alumni Association cordially in- 
vites the members of the Faculty to 
attend the informal smoker on Satur- 
day night at 8:00, in the Armory. 

Miss Chace extends a cordial invita- 
tion to faculty wives to attend the Edu- 
cation for Women Conference, in the 
Women's Building Thursday afternoon. 



Faculty supervisors on the student 
parade and celebration committee are 
urged by the chairman, Mr. Bezdek, to 
rush the completion of floats and orga- 
nize -their sections so that the parade 
can m'ove promptly at 9 : 00. 

FOOTBALL TICKETS 

Mirny faculty members were unable 
to obtain reserved seats for the Lehigh 
game through not knowing of the dis- 
tribution, last Wednesday. The Athletic 
Association will provide these with 
tickets at the Treasurer's Office, Old 
Main, from 7:00 to 8:30 p. m. Tuesday. 
If you are unable to get there at that 
time, your signed bock coupon may be 
presented by another to obtain a res- 
ervation. To make the distribution of 
faculty resevations more convenient in 
the future, it is possible that it may be 
done through the offices of the various 
Deans. 



-o- 



SCHOLASTIC REPORTS 

For some years the various frater- 
nities and other organized houses have 
been receiving .monthly scholastic re- 
poirts on their members. The date of 
these reports has heretofore been iden- 
tical with the date of the regular below 
grade reports. 

This year below grade reports will be 
made regularly only at mid-semester. 
The fraternity officers, however, have 
requested the privilege of asking for 
monthly reports as heretofore. 

Therefore on October 19 the first of 
these requests will reach the various 
instructors. My office serves simply as 
a clearing-house for the distribution 
and assembling of such reports. 

In my opinion this information is used 
to excellent advantage by most of the 
fraternity officers in checking up on 
the progress of their members. — A. R. 
Warnock, Dean of Men. 
o 



Dean Watts and Professor Fagan 
attended the. meeting of the Northern 
Nut Growers' Association at Lancaster 
last Friday. This organization is in- 
terested in research work with nut 
trees to be conducted at the college 
and may move to get funds for that 
purpose. Dean Watts read a paper on 
"A Program for the Promotion of Nut 
Culture an the U. S." 



— o- 



An engineering lecture will be given 
October 28 at 4:30 p. m., in 200 Engin- 
eering D, by Samuel L. Porcher, gen- 
eral purchasing agent of the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad system. He will talk 
on "What a Railroad Needs". 



PENN STATE OOLLEgWm 



Published every Monday dur- 
ing the college year as a means 
of making official announce- 
ments and presenting items of 
interest to the faculty 



The Pennsylvania State College 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
D. M. Cresswell, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME I 



State College, Pa., October 17, 1921 



NUMBER 2 



TO THE FACULTY. 



THE COLLEGE SENATE. 



I am glad we have the Faculty 
Bulletin, since it provides a way for 
me to say Thank You promptly to all 
members of the Faculty for their co- 
operation in making the inauguration 
so successful. 

Our guests were well treated and 
received a very favorable impression 
of State College. The machinery 
worked smoothly, but what is more 
important, the spirit of hospitality 
was everywhere present. The public 
exercises were dignified, interesting, 
and in every way creditable to us as 
an academic institution. We may 
have the satisfaction of feeling that 
at the conference and inauguration 
dinner some real contributions were 
made toward the solution of current 
problems. They were great days for 
State College. 

The active assistance and enthus- 
iastic efforts of the facluty members 
were largely responsible for the suc- 
cess of the event, and to each and 
every one I wish to express my very 
earnest and heartfelt thanks. 

I would be glad also if you would 
help me to convey to the students my 
deep appreciation of the manner N in 
which they have borne their part. 
Nothing helped more to impress our 
guests with what we have in this in- 
stitution than the student parade. It 
was very good indeed and I hope you 
will assure the students that we were 
proud of them and very grateful for 
their attitude throughout. 

"Let not him that putteth on his ar- 
mor boast himself as he that putteth 
it off." We have begun a big fight. 
Perhaps that is not quite the figure, 
and it may be better to say that we 
have started a great educational cam- 
paign. We must show the people of 
Pennsylvania what is to be gained 
from the logical and adequate devel- 
opment of this institution. It can be 
done, since we have an absolutely 
clear and convincing case. From the 
premiss of Pennsylvania's need of a 
State University to the conclusion 
that the only place to build it is right 
here, there is no flaw or fallacy in the 
argument. Every attack and objec- 
tion will be broken against the provi- 
dence which has been leading toward 
the building of the State University 
on the foundation you have laid. 

I have no cunning political plans in 
mind for the accomplishment of our 
purpose. We must appeal to the peo- 
ple, and to all the people. Members 
of the Faculty can help mightily if 
they will do their own independent 
thinking as to why we should go for- 
ward to a University and then be mis- 
sionaries of the idea whenever they 
have opportunity. It must not be a 
one-man movement. Let us all have 
part in the work in order that we may 
all have a part in the triumph. 

JOHN M. THOMAS. 



At the meeting of the Board of 
Trustees, held June 13, 1921, a stat- 
ute was adopted establishing the "Col- 
lege Senate," and discontinuing the 
then existing organization of the Gen- 
eral Faculty. The Senate has mem- 
bership and functions as follows: 

Membership: — The President of the 
College; the Deans of the several 
Schools; the Dean of Men; the Dean 
of Women; the Director of the Insti- 
tute of Animal Nutrition; the Direc- 
tor of the Health Service; the Librar- 
ian; the Registrar (secretary); the 
Comptroller; the Directors of Exten- 
sion; the Dean of Summer Session; 
the heads (or acting heads) of depart- 
ments of residence instruction and re- 
search, and three representatives 
elected from each school faculty. In 
case the head of a department is also 
a Dean, that department shall have a 
representative. 

Functions: — The College Senate 
shall be the sole legislative body on 
all questions that pertain to the edu- 
cational interests of the college, sub- 
ject to the jurisdiction of the Board of 
Trustees and on all matters that con- 
cern more than one faculty. Among 
these are: Educational policy, cours- 
es of study and curricula, admission 
requirements, graduation require- 
ments, college calendar, approving 
candidates for degrees, awards of 
scholarships and honors, regulations 
affecting students. 

"The College Senate shall interpret 
its legislation when necessary. 

In case of question of jurisdiction 
the power of decision shall rest with 
the President of the College." 

The College Senate, as thus consti- 
tuted, held its first meeting in the 
Foyer of the Auditorium Thursday 
evening, October 6, 1921, with a total 
attendance of 56. A committee on 
Organization was appointed, consist- 
ing of Messrs. Sackett, Espenshade, 
Kern, Dye, and McFarland. The Sen- 
ate approved of the appointment of a 
group of temporary committees on 
Admission, Graduate Study, Student 
Life, Athletics, College Publications, 
Academic Standards, Course of Study, 
with the understanindg that these 
committees will function until a per- 
manent organization is effected, with 
a complete list of permanent stand- 
ing committees. 

The Senate voted that appropriate 
exercises in commemoration of Arm- 
istice Day be held in the Auditorium 
at 11:20 a. m., November 11, 1921. 



The usual Directory of Faculty and 
Students is now in the hands of the 
printer, and it is hoped that every in- 
structor can receive his copy by call- 
ing at the office of his Dean on Fri- 
day, October 21. 1.^7^66^ 



PRESIDENT TO SPEAK. 



President Thomas will be out of 
town for the following appointments: 

October 19, — State Federation of 
Women, Pittsburgh. 

October 22, — -Penn State-Harvard 
game and Boston alumni dinner. 

October 23, — Phillips Academy, Ex- 
eter, New Hampshire. 

October 24, — New Haven Congre- 
gational Club, New Haven, Conn. 

October 26, — Industrial Relations 
Conference, Harrisburg. 

October 30, — Masonic Home, Eliz- 
abethtown. 



The Governor said: "Dr. Thomas 
didn't say a single thing that I don't 
believe in." 

Superintendent Finegan said: "I 
knew the State-Pitt-Penn combina- 
tion would never work. The place for 
Pennsylvania's State University is 
right here in the center of the Com- 
monwealth." 

Quoting the Governor once more: 
"Bez and I talked it over and agreed 
that the new Prexy is all right." 



Dean Sackett will represent Penn 
State at the Inauguration of Presi- 
dent Aydelotte of Swarthmore on 
Saturday of this week. Our represen- 
tative at the Inauguration of Presi- 
dent Livingston Farrand at Cornell, 
on Wednesday, will be Professor John 
E. Perry, '08, of the Cornell Faculty. 



President Thomas' inaugural ad- 
dress is being printed as a college 
bulletin and should soon be ready for 
general distribution. The Publicity 
Department has a few extra copies of 
the full printed text sent to newspa- 
pers. Any one desiring it will be sup- 
plied with a copy upon request. 



The following newspapers sent 
staff reporters to the inauguration ac- 
tivities from Thursday morning until 
Saturday evening : Philadelphia 

Public Ledger, North American, Rec- 
ord, Inquirer, Bulletin and Evening 
Public Ledger; Pittsburgh Dispatch, 
Post and Sun; Williamsport Sun. 



Dr. E. A. Martin gave three ad- 
dresses last Monday and Tuesday at 
the Susquehanna County Teachers' 
Institute on "America and the Devel- 
opment of World Democracy," — 
"American Expansion and Imperial- 
ism since 1897," and "The New Map 
of Europe." 



Announcement has been made of 
the engagement of R. D. Lewis, 
Agronomy Department, and Miss 
Adelaide Mason, attached to the office 
of Dean Warnock. 



Published every Monday dur- 
ing the college year as a means 
of making official announce- 
ments and presenting items of 
interest to the faculty 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLET] 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
D. M. Cresswell, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME I 



State College, Pa., October 24, 1921 



NUMBER 3 



THE PROBATION SECTION 

During the last summer the Council 
of Administration authorized for one 
year only the organization of a Proba- 
tion 'Section for studnts desiring to 
change courses, in which the following 
principal features were included: 

Members of the section will not be 
affiliated with any school, but will be 
under the supervision of the Dean of 
Men, or Dean of Wiomen. An applicant 
for admission to the section must have 
the recommendation of the dean of the 
school in which he has last registered 
and the approval of the dean of the 
school to which he wishes to transfer. 
In the catalogue and directory no 
course shall be designated for students 
in this section. 

Membership in the section shall be 
for one semester only. At the end of 
the semester the student will be trans- 
ferred to the school of his new choice, 
if in the opinion of the Dean of that 
school his work during the probation 
semester has been sufficiently promis- 
ing. 

Instructors' mid-semester and final 
reports on students in this section shall 
be sent directly to the Dean of Men or 
the Dean of Women. 

The continuation of this arrangement 
after the present year shall depend 
upon action by the College Senate. 

The following students have been ad- 
mitted to the Probation Section for the 
current semester, and instructors 
should send to the Dean of Men the re- 
quired grade reports in their cases: 
R. C. Bender, R. T. Cook, R. Cornish, 
H. S. Davis, W. H. Fortna, H. S. 
Kenah, J. P. Kuntz, Jr., T. K. Laws, 
F, F. O'Donnell, G. T Peifer, William 
Rettew, H. A. Sayford, H. A. Wrigley 
and F. G. Hoenstine. 



Dr. Ritenour of the Health Service 
desires to call the attention of instruc- 
tors to the ruling that all students ab- 
sent on account of sickness, in order to 
be excused must present the official 
excuse issued by the college physician. 
When other physician's excuses are 
presented the student should be direct- 
ed to secure the proper form from the 
Health Service. 



The Council of Administration meets 
regularly every Monday morning at 
10 o'clock in the office of the Presi- 
dent. All matters that faculty mem- 
*<ber,s desire to have presented to this 
body should be in the hands of the 
Secretary, Prof. A. H. Espenshade, at 
or before noon of the preceading Sat- 
urday, 



STUDENTS LEAVE COLLEGE 

Hereafter the publication in the Fac- 
ulty Bulletin of the names of students 
who have left college' will take the 
place of the "Drop" notices sent by the 
Registrar to the individual instructors. 
Since the opening of the present ses- 
sion the following students have left 
college : 

Freshmen 

John Joseph Augustine 

John Harry Shellenberger 

Jacob Donald McGee 

Ctrl Edward Schmidlin 

Glenn Robert Deigand 

Paul Beale Hammaker 
</ Philip Joseph McAniff 

Fred Fraser MacWilliams 

Leo Quinn 

George Edward Shumaker 

Wolff Vosburg 

Richard Wharton 

Wilma Brown King 

Joseph Lerner 

Morris Leon Fisher 

William Frederick Johnson 

Alfred Kelley Houser 



The class in Institutional Manage- 
ment of the Department of Home Eco- 
nomics has resumed the serving of 
dinners, Tuesday evening at 5:45, Room 
14, in the Wumans Building Reserva- 
tions >may be made at the office of the 
Department of Home Economics before 
9:30 each Monday morning. 
o ■ 

The mailing list for the Faculty Bul- 
letin is made up from the faculy dir- 
ectory issued last week. Anyone whose 
name is not on that list and who des- 
ires to receive the Bulletin weekly, 
should notify the Bulletin Editor, 175 
Main Building. 

— — o 

The Assistant Registrar desires to 
receive immcdiatley, on a Daily Sche- 
dule blank, a copy of the actual sche- 
dule of every instructor for the first 
semester. 



Of the 209 students now registered 
in the Two-year course in agriculture, 
ninety come from towns with a popu- 
lation of 5000 or more; and thirty-one 
of these come from Philadelphia and 
Pittsburgh. It would appear that these 
figures indicate a great interest in 
Rural Life on the part of urban popu- 
lations. 



President Thomas will be the speak- 
er at the Elizabethtown Masonic Home 
next Sunday. The college glee club 
will assist with the service, and also 
give a concert on Saturday evening. 



M CHANGE COURSES 

For the information of the Faculty, 
the Registrar reports that eighty-four 
■students have changed their course 
from one scool to another at the begin- 
ning of the first semester. The stud- 
ents thus changing courses were dis- 
tributed as follows among the several 
classes: Seniors, 7; Juniors, 22; Sopho- 
mores, 38 ; Freshmen, 13 ; Special Stud- 
ents, 4. 

The following tabulation indicates 
each School's gain or loss in number: 
From Agr. 15 ; to Agr. 12 ; . Loss 3. 
From Eng. 32; to Eng. 14; Loss 18 
From H. Eco. 9; to H. Eco. 1; Loss 8 
From Mines 7; to Mines 1; Loss 6 
From N. Sci. 18; to N. Sci. 1; Loss 17 
Frof L. Arts 3; to L. Arts 55; Gain 52 



No written permits to be absent on 
account of out of town football games 
will be issued to students. Students 
desiring to make these trips will be 
sent to their instructors for individual 
treatment according to their standing in 
class. 

A. R. WARNOCK, 

Dean of Men 



We are unable at this time to make 
definite announcement as to the dis- 
tribution of reserved seat tickets to 
the Carnegie Tech football game on 
Pennsylvania Day for faculty memb- 
ers. It is possible that it will be done 
through the offices of the Deans. 
Watch the Collegian, the bulletin 
boards and the Co-op window for an- 
nouncement early this week. 



The. senior Home Economics class 
has opened a Cafeteria School Lunch 
in Room 14, Woman's Building. A 
simple hot "lunch will be served every 
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and 
Thursday at 12:15. Members of the 
faculty and students who have no reg- 
ular boarding place are welcome. 



The next Y. M. C. A.-Music Depart- 
ment attraction will be given in the 
Auditorium next Saturday evening. 
Alberto Salvi, harpist. 



At the college chapel service here 
next Sunday the college chorus will 
render Gounbd's Cantata, "Gallia." 



There is a real banana tree bearing 
a nicely growing bunch -of fruit to be 
seen in the conservatory to the left of 
the Botany Building. It is the center 
of attraction these days as the tree 
bears only once in a half-dozen years 
or so. 



Published every Monday dur- 
ing the college year as a means 
of making official announce- 
ments and presenting items of 
interest to the faculty 



The Pennsylvania State College 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
D. M. Cresswell, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME I 



State College, Pa., October 31, 1921 



NUMBER 4 



PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTS 

A study of the comparative utility 
for administrative purposes of certain 
recognized mental tests is being made 
by the Department of Education and 
Psychology. The freshmen class of 

1919 was given the Army test, that of 

1920 the Thurstone test, with the re- 
sults as shown at the bottom of the 
page. 

The average college grade in Army 
is about 131, in Thurstone about 93. 
Compared with other colleges Penn 
State's average Thurston was 93.2, that 
of 43 other, including technical as well 
as literary, institutions was 88.8. 

Army Alpha, Thurstone and Binet- 
Simon tests were correlated with grad- 
es made by students in high school 
and at Penn State to determine rela- 
tive value of grades in these tests as 
indexes predictive of quality of colleg- 



iate work. The following positive cor- 
relations were obtained: 

Army scores and college grades 0.41 
Thurs. scores & college grades 0.32 
Binet-Simon and college grades 0.17 
The Army Alpha is seen to have the 
highest correlation (maximum possible 
is 1.00), and consequently to be the 
best forecaster of quality of collegiate 
work. This index (0.41) satisfies the 
educational demands of a fairly reli- 
able test. 

Of 67 cases dismissed for poor schol- 
arship the Army average was 118 com- 
pared with the general average of 131. 
It is the plan of the department to 
continue this study and in the near 
future the freshman class of 1921 is to 
be tested. 

A more detailed report of the tests 
appears in "School and Society" on 
October 1, 1921. 





PSYCHOLOGICAL 


TESTS 






Army- 


-1919 




Thurston— 1920 




Average 


No. 


Tested 


Average No. Tested 


All Schools 


131.2 




847 


93.2 776 


Agriculture 


126.8 




145 


93.1 175 


Engineering 


131.2 




370 


93.5 328 


Home Economics 


121.6 




35 


91.5 46 


Liberal Arts 


133.1 




116 


91.7 113 


Mines 


136.9 




58 


96.6 41 


Natural Science 


134.2 




124 


94.1 73 



HALF-SEMESTER COURSES END 

For the benefit of those instructors 
teaching half-semester subjects, it 
should be noted that the first half of 
the first semester ends Tuesday, No- 
vember 8, at 5:30 p. m. — Wm. S. 
Hoffman, Assistant Registrar. 



SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS 

The Committee on Scholarships and 
Prizes calls attention to the need for 
information on student candidates for 
the Louise Carnegie and John W. 
White scholarships, from every faculty 
member. Blanks for giving this infor- 
mation can be secured from Deans or 
department heads or from the secretary 
of the committee, Dr. Kern. Informa- 
tion should be in the hands of the 
committee not later than Friday of 
this week. 



TO FORM SCIENCE BRANCH 

The State College members of the 
American Association for the advance- 
ment of Science will meet Wednesday 
evening, November 2, at the University 
Club. Dinner will be served at 6:00, 
followed by a conference to be address- 
ed by Dr. L. R. Jones, of the National 
Research Council who will discuss 
organization for promotion of research. 
The matter of a permanent organiza- 
tion of a local branch of the American 
Association for the Advancement of 
Science will be considered. 



COLLEGE GUEST HOUSE 
'The residence formerly occupied by 
Dr. Pond has been furnished through- 
out for the housing of college guests. 
It will be known as the Guest House. 
It affords comfortable quarters for 
twelve people. The rate of charge is 
$1.50 per night. Mass Huntley, whose 
office is in McAllister Hall, is in charge. 
Reservations may be made on applica- 
tion to her. 



RESEARCH MAN TO SPEAK 
President Thomas and the committee 
on Graduate Study announce a general 
meeting at 4:30 on Thursday after- 
noon, Nov. 3, in the Foyer of the 
Auditorium, to be addressed by Dr. L. 
R. Jones, chairman of the Division of 
Biology and Agriculture, of the Nati- 
onal Research Council. The topic will 
be "Cooperation in Research." The 
meeting is arranged to promote inter- 
est in research in our institution, and 
it is hoped that it will be well attended 
by faculty members of all schools and 
departments. 



BELOW-GRADE REPORTS 
Some misunderstanding" or doubt 
seems to exist as to the present col- 
lege regulation respecting' "below-grade 
reports/' The regulation now in ef- 
fect (adopted February 17, 1921) is 
as follows: "A single below-grade re- 
port for each semester should be made 
at, the end of the eighth week." .-The 
eighth week of the first semester ends 
on Wednesday, Novembei 9, 1921. 

A. H. Espenshade, Registrar 



-d 



SCHOOL FACULTY MEETINGS 
There will be a meeting of the fac- 
ulty of the School of Natural Science 
on Monday, November 7, at 4:30 p. m. 
in the Physics Lecture Room. 

There will be a meeting of the fac- 
ulty of the School of the Liberal Arts 
on Wednesday, November second, in 
Room 25, Liberal Arts Building, at 
4:30 p. m. 



STUDENTS LEAYE COLLEGE 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: Freshmen — 
Jack Barron, Robert Andrew Loy, 
and Harry Leo Rice. Junior— Raymond 
Otis Pettigrew. 

A. II. ESPENSHADE, Registrar. 



PENNSYLVANIA DAY 

The board of trustees of the college 
will meet on Friday evening at 7:30 
in the Carnegie Library. Pennsylva- 
nia Day will be observed quietly. There 
will be a football mass meeting on 
Friday night and the Glee Club will 
give a concert on Saturday evening. 
o 

Dr. Paul D. Moody, who succeeded 

President Thomas as president of 

Middlebury College will be the speaker 

at the chapel exercises next Sunday. 

o 

Dr. C. R. Orton, of the Botany De- 
partment, left last Wednesday for Lan- 
disville, Lancaster County, to investi- 
gate a possible source of a serious 
idisease of wheat that is thought to 
have been established in this state. As 
a member of the Board of Governors of 
the Crop Protection institute formed 
last year by the National Research 
Council, he attended the annual meet- 
ing in New York on Friday. The In- 
stitute was formed to got commercial 
men and scientists working for the 
protection of all crops against insects 
and disease. Dr. Orton is one of sev- 
en scientists on the governing board. 



The address of Dean Moore as given 
in the student and faculty directory is 
incorrectly given as 138 South Allen 
Street. It should be 138 South Ather- 
ton Street. 



. 



Published every Monday dur- 
ing the college year as a means 
of making official announce- 
ments and presenting items of 
interest to the faculty 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETI 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
D. M. Cresswell, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME I 



State College, Pa., November 7, 1921 



NUMBER 5 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

The official calendar will be 
followed as to the Thanksgiving 
recess. All college exercise 
will be omitted on Thanksgiving 
Day but will be held as usual on 
Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, 
November twenty-fifth, sixth, and 
seventh. 

The attention of all instruc- 
tors is called to the obligation to 
maintain the schedule strictly at 
all times. 

Armistice Day will be observed 
with public exercises at 11:20 a. 
m. November eleventh and reg- 
ular college exercises will be 
omitted during that period and 
for the remainder of the day. 
JOHN M. THOMAS, 

President. 



*! 



During the past week the fol- 
lowing students have left college: 

Senior — Ruth Alverta Nyer. 

Sophomores — Harold Dietrich 
Cochrane and Henry Paul New- 
man. 

Freshmen — James Henderson 
Miller, Winston Knipe Ogden and 
Albert Charles Roehn. 

A. H. ESPENSHADE 

Registrar 



ARMISTICE DAY 

A program in keeling with the ob- 
servance of Armistice Day will be 

■ ii in ;he Auditorium on Friday 
morning at 11:20. Assistant Profes- 
sor Steele, commander of the Nittany 
Post 245 American Legion, will have 
charge. The college band will assist. 
"The invocation and benediction will be 
given by Assistant Professor George 
F. Mitch. Short addresses will be giv- 
en by Dr. W. S. Dye, and T. S. Pak- 
enham. The Unknown Soldier will be 
eulogized by Arthur Deering, followed 
by "taps" and silent prayer. Classes 
,will be dismissed at 11:20 for the bal- 
ance of the day. 



STUDENT ENROLLMENT 3129 

The College now has an attendance 
of 3129 iundergraduate students, div- 
ided as follows among the several 
classes: Seniors, 574; Juniors, 684; 
Sophomores, 720; Freshmen, 894; Two 
year Ag. 210; Specials, 47. 

The following table indicates the reg- 
istration in the different schools: Ag- 
riculture, 854; Engineering, 1107; Lib- 
eral Arts, 579; Mines, 158; Natural 
Science 285; Home Economics, 146. 



THE TRUSTEES' MEETING 

At the regular meeting of the Board 
of Trustees held Friday night some of 
the actions taken follow: — 

Dean Chambers was appointed Di- 
rector of Vocational Teacher Training 
in the college. 

The Engineering Extension Division 
was renamed "The Department of En- 
gineering Extension" with Professor N. 
C. Miller as head of the department. 
Resignations 

iS. R. Black, Instructor in Industrial 
Engineering, effective June 30, 1921. 

J. L. Folker, Instructor in Industrial 
Education, effective October S, 1921. 

W. W. Patchell, Instructor in Civil 
Engineering, effective June 30, 1921. 

H. L. Reiohelderfer, Instructor in En- 
gineering Extension, effective October 
15, 1921. 

Sara L. Pattee and Elizabeth Mc- 
Killip, Library Assistants, effective 
October 15, 1921. 

Leave of Absence 

J. M. McKee, County Agent in Wash- 
ington County, from October 15, 1921, 
to June 15, 1922. 

Advancement in Rank 

O. A. Knight from Assistant Profes- 
son to Associate Professor of Metal- 
lurgy. 

W. O. Thompson from Instructor to 
Assistant Professor of Military Science 
and Tactics. 

Kathryne Stanford from Assistant 
Librarian to Librarian of the School 
of Agriculture. 

New Appointments 

Carl A. Benander, Instructor in 
Mathematics. 

Jane Humphrey, Instructor in Do- 
mestic Science. 

Philip X. Rice, Instructor in Electri- 
cal Engineering. 

A. J. Soube, Research Assistant in 
Poultry Husbandry. 

P. H. Sprenkle, County Agent in 
Bucks County. 

H. T. Hamel, Student Assistant in 
Engineering Drawing. 

Margaret T. Parker, Library Assist- 
ant. 



PENNSYLVANIA DEGREES 

The State Department of Public In- 
struction reports that the 46 accredit- 
ed colleges and universities in Penn- 
sylvania during the past year conferr- 
ed 3498 degrees. These figures are 
complete except that no full return 
has been made for the degrees of M. 
S. or Ph.D. The total number is div- 
ided among the various degrees as fol- 
lows: B. A., 1122; B. S., 1343; Ph.B., 
54; M. A., 138; E. E., 42; M. E., 69; 
C. E., 85; E. M., 19; M. D., 177; LL.B., 
80; D. D. S. 214; Ph. G., 148; and 
Phar. D„ 7. 



GUEST ENTERTAINMENT 
If members of the faculty whose 
departmental guests are making use of 
the College Guest House will notify 
Dean Knight, it will be possible to 
show those guests some special court- 
esy when they come to McAllister Hall 
for meals. Those who have bs^n en- 
tertained this past week have been 
greatly embarrased by s:eming to bo 
unexpected at the Dining Commons. 



The chapel speaker for next Sunday 
is the Rev. Irving Maurer, pastor of 
the First Congregational Church, Col- 
umbus, O. 



Dean Chambers was in the vicinity 
of Wilkes-Barre and Scranton last 
week making preparations for the es- 
tablishment of teacher extension 
schools. He also spoke at the Luzerne 
institute. 

Professor D. A. Anderson spent last 
week at Ebensburg lecturing before 
the Cambria County Teachers' Insti- 
tute. 



Mrs. Chester V. Story, of the Joseph 
Horn Company, of Pittsburgh, will 
give an address on "Intelligent Dress- 
ing" in Old Chapel, Tuesday afternoon, 
November 8, at 4:15 p. m. Women 
members of the Faculty are cordially 
invited. 



Will those of the faculty who belong 
to the State Educational Association 
or who wish to become members, kind- 
ly communicate with me soon? One 
dollar pays dues until July 1, 1922. 
This carries with it the Pennsylvania 
School Journal. — D. A. Anderson, 21 
Liberal Arts. 



The Faculty Bulletin is still very 
much in the infant stage. Therefore it 
is requested that all faculty members 
contribute as much as possible to- 
wards filling its columns. Variety, 
brevity and quantity of items will 
make it more valuable to all. 

It is requested that as much material 
as possible for next week's Faculty Bui- 
letin be in the hands of the editor by 
Thursday evening, Nov. 10. 
o 

In view of the fact that the students 
in Institutional Management, Depart- 
ment of Home Economics, are to do 
field work in Philadelphia this week, 
there will be no Institututioncl Din- 
ner on Tuesday. The next dinner will 
be served on November 15th. 
o 

Found. — A gold watch. Owner can 
have same by calling at Mr. Hibsh- 
man's office, 180 Old Main. 



u ttd toucn arrol+ud'-'inoD "0°*!!o ^Ifst"* RIftRWJV "i ^ M ^H I ■ Tu5 X-s&noM riave JtedBlIduq: 

dam bir* .eldtawq e* le»- J3lllto\» l^l*is> J. Oil X ansem s en ise? eselloo edi snl 

























































































Published every Monday dur- 
ing the college year as a means 
of making official announce- 
ments and presenting items of 
interest to the faculty 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
D. M. Cresswell, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



; 



VOLUME I 



State College, Pa., November 14, 1921 



NUMBER 6 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

There will be a meeting of the Col- 
lege Senate on Tuesday, November 22, 
at 7:30 p. m., in the Foyer of the Audi- 
torium. 

A. H. ESPENSHADE, Secretary. 
o 

During the past week James Howard 
Worley, of the Senior class, withdrew 
from College. 

A. H. ESPENSHADE, Registrar. 
o 

The chapel speaker for next Sunday 
is Dr. Rockwell Potter, pastor of the 
First Church of Christ, (Center Con- 
gregational) Hartford, Conn. 



VALUABLE FELLOWSHIP 

The agricultural school has recently 
been granted a fellowship carrying 
$2700 by the Northwestern Yeast Com- 
pany of Chicago for the purpose of de- 
termining the use of waste products 
as poultry feed. The company manu- 
factures a brittle yeast cake and the 
breaking in packing is necessarily 
large, the broken pieces being of little 
use. Proffessors R. A. Dutcher, head of 
the chemical agriculture department 
and H. C. Knandel, head of the poultry 
husbandry department, are undertak- 
ing the desired research work with 
the assistance of A. J. Souba, a gradua- 
te of the University of Minnesota, well 
(fitted in the breeding and handling of 
hens. The value of vitamines suppos- 
ed to be contained in the yeast will be 
! determined in a series of experiments 
with the 500 hens in the college flocks. 
The birds will be trapnested and their 
eggs and weights compared in the pro- 
cess of determining the value of this 
produlct as an addition to poultry 
'rations, 

o ■ ■■ ■ 

Dr. Sparks attended the educational 
conference at Harrisburg last week-end 
held under the auspices of the State 
Department of Public Instruction. A 
number of other faculty members ac- 
companied him. 

The college representatives on the 
board of directors of the borough 
Chamber of Commerce are Dean W. 
C. Stoddart and comptroller R. H. 
Smith. Mr. Smith was re-elected presi- 
dent and Dr. William Prear vice-presi- 
dent of the board. E. E. Overdorf, 
president of the Senior class, is the 
student representative on this board. 



DE. BOUCKE'S NEW BOOK 

Concerning "The Development of 
Economics,'' the latest book to be pub- 
lished by Dr. O. Fred Boucke, of the 
economics department, MacMillan's an- 
nouncement says: 

The same clear and vigorous think- 
ing which was widely recognized in the 
author's "Limits of Socialism" marks 
this new work. The history of eco- 
nomic thought is treated from a fresh 
point of view. The author presents 
the thought of the various economists 
as a part of a continuous development 
of economics as a science. Instead of 
a chronological outline with brief sum- 
maries of the work of each man, the 
book is a unified account of the premis- 
es and principles of the major schools 
of economics — naturalism, utilitarian- 
ism, historism and marginism. The 
hook is well provided with notes and 
biographical material. 

— o — 

INAUGURAL COMMENTS 

RECEIVED BY THE PRESIDENT 
From President \V. C. Ketler, Grove 
City College 

"I want to assure you that it was a 
great pleasure to be present at your 
inauguration. It was certainly well 
planned and well carried out. The 
pageant carried out hy the students 
was one of the most successful and 
interesting I have ever seen and all 
of the exercises went off unusually 
well." 
From President Arthur A. Hammer- 
schlag, Carnegie Institute of Technol- 
ogy 

"I have heard so many favorable com 
ments upon your inaugural exercises 
that I want to couple them with my 
own and tell you that the parade of 
the students, the address of Mr. 
iSchwab, and the simple dignity and 
deep feeling of the inaugural cere- 
mony comprise a group of addresses 
and events which mark them as uni- 
que in a year in which many similar 
functions are occurring." 
From Edwin R. iSmith, Professor of 
Mathematics, Iowa State College 

"The logic and vigor of your address 
ought to convince any thinking man 
of the desirability of making the 
College become a great university for 
the state. I congratulate you on the 
big program which you have laid 
dow r n and I want you to know that I 
am one of the host who anticipate 
the early realization of your aims". 

o ■ 

Dean Warnock addressed the Rotary 
Club of Altoona last Tuesday night, 
speaking on the possibilities such an 
organization has for urging young men 
to attend college. He indicated how 
the cluh there could keep in touch with 
Penn State students from Altoona. 



SCIENTISTS OBGAMZE 

The local members of the Association 
fur the Advancement of Science have 
organized and are asking the National 
Council of the Association for a charter 
to form a Pennsylvania State College 
Branch of the Association. There is 
good reason to expect that the charter 
will be granted by the council. 

The purpose of the organization is 
to promote and stimulate research in 
this institution and to cultivate a spirit 
of mutual appreciation of and cooper- 
ation in research of all kinds among 
the members regardless of department- 
al and scholastic lines. Membership 
in the American Association was select- 
ed as the basis of organization because 
it stands for something broad enough 
to embrace all the varied interests of 
the college and because the formation 
of a local branch of this Association 
was an immediate possibility. There is 
no spirit of exclusiveness in the organ- 
ization and since the local branch is 
practically assured, it is hoped that 
everyone connected with the institution 
who is in sympathy with and interested 
in its objects may join the National 
organization of the American Associa- 
tion for the Advancement of Science 
and automatically become a member 
of the local branch. Anyone joining 
the Association before January 1, 1922, 
will become a charter member of the 
local branch. 

It is customary at this season of the 
year for the national organization to 
undertake a campaign for new mem- 
bers, therefore this is an opportune 
time for persons contemplating join- 
ing to apply for membership. Those 
memJbers of the faculty who are already 
members are urged to call the atten- 
tion of those of their colleagues who are 
eligible to the advantages of member- 
ship. Eligibility to membership is 
based upon interest in the advancement 
of scicnee. 

It is possible that the local branch 
will serve as a general clearing house 
for the discussion of scientific and re- 
search problems in their broader as- 
pects and that it will become a very 
helpful and influential organization. 
The secretary, Dr. J. Ben Hill, will be 
provided with application blanks for 
membership and will be g'ld to discuss 
the matter of application for member- 
ship with any interested persons. 

NEW COUNTY LIST 

The Registrar has just compiled a 
new "county list" of students. The 
names are arranged alphabetically ac- 
cording to counties and classes. Mem- 
bers of the Faculty may consult this 
list at any time by calling at the Reg- 
istrar's Office. 



Published every Monday dur- 
ing the college year as a means 
of making official announce- 
ments and presenting items of 
interest to the faculty 




Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
D. M. Cresswell, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME I 



State College, Pa., November 21, 1921 



NUMBER 7 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

A change in the hour and place for 
the College Senate Meeting Tuesday, 
November 22, has been made. It will 
be held at EIGHT o'clock in the OLD 
CHAPEL. A student athletic mass 
meeting will be held in the Auditorium 
at 7 o'clock the same evening. 



■There will be no College classes on 
Thursday, November 24, Thanksgiving- 
Day. 



There will be a meeting of the Facul- 
ty of the School of Agriculture and 
Experiment Station on Tuesday, Nov- 
ember 22, at 4:30 p. m., in room 103, 
Agr 1 eultiu ral B u Siding . 



The chape 1 ! speaker for nexit Sunday 
is the Rev. Sherwood Eddy, of the In- 
ternational Y. M. C. A., New York Oilty. 

During the past week Donald Leroy 
McMahon, of the Freshman class, and 
William Resinger, of the Two-Year 
Agriculture class (1st' Year), withdrew 
from college. 

A. H. ESPENSHADE, Registrar 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS COPIES 

The Inaugural Address of President 
Thomas has been published as number 
12 of The Pennsylvania State College 
Bulletin. Copies may be had on appli- 
cation to E. K. Hibsihman at the Presi- 
dent's Office, or will ho mailed direct to 
any addresses which imay be furnished. 
It is desired ito place this bulletin in 
the hands of every Pennsylvania citiz- 
en who is interested in the college. 
o 

Dean Wlarnock will attend the annual 
Interfraternity Conference in New York 
thlis week-end. jForty-five inatiorja.1 
fraternities will be ■represented. About 
fifteen Deans of Men from various 
colleges will be there. 

o — 

CHEMISTRY LECTURES 

The Liebig Chemical Society of the 
Department of Chemical Agriculture 
announces that Dr. R. E. Lee, Head 
Research Chemist for the Fleisohimann 
Yealst Company, will spieak on "The 
Manufacture of Yeast and Its Uses in 
Bread Making," in Room 206, Agricul- 
tural Building at 7:30, Wednesday 
night, November 30th. 

On Thursday evening, December 1st, 
Dr Dee will deliver a second address 
on "The Biological Chemisit, in In- 
dustry." Dr Lee will bring a very in- 
teresting exhibit for use in demon- 
strating /his lectures. Both lectures 
arte open to the public. 



THE FACULTY MAIL 

It appears that the faculty 'mail ser- 
vice has suffered needless abuse on 
several recent occasions, probably thru 
lack of information. In order that de- 
liveries 'might be 'made promptly it is 
necessary that large watches of mail 
■matter for campus distribution be 
"routed" in separate packages for sep- 
arate buildings before it is turned in at 
■the exchange in Main Building or given 
to the carrier on his rounds. 

In other words, when a large mailing 
is made, and there are several letters 
for one of many buildings, those for 
each building should be bound with a 
rubber band or string. If this is not 
done the college carrier 'must take time 
from his rounds to sort this mail to 
facilitate delivery. This detracts time 
from his delivery, and frequently makes 
distribution late for 'Several days. This 
"routing" must be done in the office 
where the mail matter originates. 

It is also to be remembered that 
campus deliveries only can be made 
through the faculty snail exchange 
without postage. 'Letters addressed to 
points off the campus must bear the 
regular rates of postage. 

o 

THE PRESIDENT'S ENGAGEMENTS 

President Thomas speaks before the 
Clinton County Teachers' Institute at 
Lock Haven today (Monday) and will 
also be on the program at the gather- 
ing of Penn State alumni in the Cham- 
ber of Commerce Building, Pittsburgh, 
Wednesday night. He will attend the 
Thanksgiving Day football game with 
Pitt. 

He will also attend the International 
Livestock Show at Chicago on Nov- 
ember 30, and will represent the College 
at the inauguration of President Kin- 
ley at the University of Illinois. On 
December 6 hie will speak at a meeting 
of the Rotary Club of Milton. 



Announcement has been made of the 
marriage of M. C. Gilpin, class of 1915, 
and Miss Sarah Shue, at Hanover, Pa., 
October. 22. Mr. Gilpin was formerly 
assistant director of college publicity 
and Miss Shue was located for several 
years in the office of the president. They 
are residing in Pittsburgh where Mr. 
Gilpin is an assistant editor of the 
National Stockman and Farmer. 
o 

During the Thanksgiving and Christ- 
mas recesses a number of faculty 
members usually attend educational or 
other meetings in various parts of the 
country. It lisi requested that these 
send in reports of their engagements 
of this nature, giving names of papers 
read, etc., to the Bulletin Editor. Both 
"before" and "after" reports are de- 
sired. 



SENATE MEMBERSHIP 

The following persons constitute the 
present membership of the College 
Senate : 

D. A. Anderson C. L. Kinsloe 
Hugo Bezdek H. C. Knandel 

R. U. Blasingaime Margaret A. Knight 

C. A. Bonine O. A. Knight 

A. A. Borland A .L. Kocher 

0. F. Boucke E. J. Kunze 

P. B. Breneman M. S. McDowell 

R. G. Bnesslei- D. F. McFarlancl 

Edith P. Chace A. E. Martin 

W. G. Chambers T. W. Mason 

W. R. Chedsey E. S. Moore 

G. A. Comly C. F. Noll 

W. D. Crockett J. H. Olewine 

W. G. Duncan F. L. Pattee 

R. A. Dutcher J. P. Ritenour 

E. H. Dusham C. C. Robinson 
W. S. Dye, Jr. 3. W. Runkle' 
A. H. Bspenshade R. L. Sackett 
J. A. Ferguson, John E. Schott 

E. A. Fessenden H. B. Shattuck 
S. W. Fletcher Miss Simmons 

1. L. Foster K. J. Sloman 
William Frear R. H. Smith 

J. A. Fries C. W. Stoddart 

F. D. Gardner J. M. Thomas 

G. R. Green W. H. Tomhave 
W. R. Ham J. H. Tudor 

C. L. Harris E. D. Walker 

J. B. Hill A. R. Warnock 

A. P. Honess R. L. Watts 

F. D. Kern J. M. Wfilard 
A. J. Wood 



DEAN SACKETT HONORED 

At the Land Grant College Conven- 
tion in New Orleans last week Dean 
Sackett was elected Chairman of the 
Engineering Section which includes the 
Deans of Engineering of the 44 Land 
Grant Institutions. He has been Sec- 
retary for two years and during the 
year just past edited four quarterly re- 
ports of the Engineering Experiment 
Stations of the iLand Grant Colleges. 
Eighteen lhave Engineering Experiment 
Stations of which Penn State has the 
third in order of organization. Four 
stations were added last year. 
o 

E. K. HibS'hman, assistant to the 
president in public relations, attended 
a comimunity organization meeting at 
Loretto, the home of Charles M. 
Schwab, last Thursday e .ening. E. S. 
Bayard, a member of the College Board 
of Trutees, also attended. 



The Penn State Players will give a 
free entertainment in the Auditorium 
on the evening of Saturday, December 
3. The programi will include three one- 
act plays, entitled: "Aren't they wond- 
ers?" "The Proposal" and "The Dear 
Departed." 



Published every Monday dur- 
ing the college year as a means 
of making official announce- 
ments and presenting items of 
interest to the faculty 



The Pennsylvania State College 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
D. M. Cresswell, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME I 



State College, Pa., November 28, 1921 



NUMBER 8 



During the past week BalpSi Furness 
Walker and Cluunieey Ellsworth Piper 
of the Freshman class, and Hermann 
Jacob Wentzler, of the Sophomore 
class, withdrew from college. 

A. H. ESPBNSHADE, Registrar 
o— 

The attention of all instructors is 
called to the fact that on May 31, 1921, 
the General Faculty voted to abolish 
re-examinations, "this action to become 
effective immediately after the opening 
of the college year 1921-1922." 

A. H. BSPENSHADE, Registrar 



All changes of residence addresses 
that have taken place since the publi- 
cation of the "Faculty and Student 
Directory" should be sent to the Presi- 
dent's Office immediately for use in the 
preparation of the General Catalogue. 

VAPOR HEATING TALK 

C. V. Haynes, of Philadelphia, repre- 
senting the Hoffman Specialty Com- 
pany of Waterbury, Conn., will give 
a "Hoffman Talk" in Room 200 En- 
gineering D, Tuesday, November 29, at 
7 o'clock in the evening, on "Vapor 
Heating." All interested are cordially 
invited to attend. The lecture is ar- 
ranged by the Department of Mechani- 
cal Engineering in connection with the 
course in Heating and Ventilation. 



BEANS OF WOMEN MEET 

Dean Knight, chairman of the Deans 
of Women Section of the Educational 
Association of Western Pennsylvania, 
attended the regular Fall meeting of 
the association held in Pittsburgh last 
Saturday. The subjects discussed in- 
cluded "How Ma j Deans of Women 
Promote Higher Scholarship Among 
Students?" and "What Part Should 
Deans of Women Play in the Health 
Program of Schools and Colleges?" 
Dean Amos and Dr. George E. Jones 
of the University of Pittsburgh were 
among those who appeared on the pro- 
gram. 

o 

C. B. Neblette, College photographer, 
has been chosen a member of the ed- 
itorial staff of the "Annual of Photo- 
graphy," a publication that reviews the 
year's activity in matters photographic. 
The volume will contain an article by 
him, reviewing scientific photography. 

The Century Company will issue in 
the late Spring a volume of essays in 
criticism by Professor Pattee on some 
later phases of American literature. 



APPOINT SENATE COMMITTEES 

At the second meeting of the College 
Senate last Tuesday evening most of 
the time was spent in preparing a con- 
stitution and by-laws for adoption. The 
following standing committees of the 
Senate were appointed: 

On Admission 
Professor Espenshade, Chairman; 
Professors Bressler, D. C. Duncan, and 
C. D. Harris. 

On Graduate Study 
Dean Moore, Chairman ; Professors 
Frear, Hill, Kinsloe and Runkle. 

On Athletics 
Professor Tomhave, Chairman; Pro- 
fessors Bezdek, Comly, Ham, and Shat- 
tuck. 

On Student Welfare 
Dr. Fletcher, Chairman; Deans War- 
nock and Knight ; Professors Dusham 
and Simmons. 

On Publications 
D. M. Cressweil, Chairman ; Profes- 
sors Blasingame, Dye, O. A. Knight, 
and Kocher. 

On Academic Standards 
Professor Walker, Chairman ; Pro- 
fessors D. A. Anderson, Gardner, Mar- 
quardt, College Examiner. 

On Courses of Study 

Dean Stoddart, Chairman; Professors 
Ferguson, Fessenden, McFarland, and 
A. E. Martin. 

On Research 
Dr. Kern, Chairman; Professors 
Boucke, Dutcher, Schott, and Wood. 

A. H. ESPENSHADE, 

Secretary 



President Thomas will represent 
Penn State at the installation of Pres- 
ident David Kinley at the University 
of Illinois and attend the conference 
there on "The Relation of the Federal 
Government to Education," on Thurs- 
day and Friday of this week. The con- 
ference will doubtless bring pointers 
for aid to Land Grant institutions. 
President Kinley spoke at the President 
Thomas inaugural dinner. 

— o 

George H. Rea, late of the Cornell 
agricultural extension service, joins the 
Penn State agricultural extension staff 
on Thursday as a bee specialist, with 
the rank of assistant professor. He is 
the first bee man ever to be engaged 
by the college, and judging from the 
many requests for information on bee 
keeping that come to the College, he 
will be a busy bee man. 



GOLF RATES REVISED 

At the recent meeting of the Board 
of Trustees, the following revised sche- 
dule of golf course rates was approved: 
Faculty members, employees of the 
college, and residents of the Borough 
of State College, per person, per year, 
$15.00 

Visitors per day 75 

Visitors per week. 2.50 

Visitors per month 6.00 

— o — 

ENGINEERING LECTURE 

J. P. Jordan, Consulting Industrial 
Engineer, of New York will speak to 
the engineering students on the after- 
noon of December 2nd at 4:30 in room 
200, Engineering D. Mr. Jordan is an 
unusual speaker and while the subject 
has not been announced he is consider- 
ed an expert on Labor and Labor prob- 
lems. He spoke recently at (the Wil- 
liamsport meeting of the A. S. M. E. 
and his address was unusually instruc- 
tive. 

■ — — o — — 

Dean Chambers 'reports unusual 
progress in the organization of exten- 
sion classes for teachers throughout 
the state. In eight weeks time he has 
secured almost 1200 course enrollments. 
Requests for the establishment of 
these classes have come from all parts 
of the state, and if teachers could be 
obtained the enrollment would be doub- 
led in a very short time. Over 800 
enrollments are in Pittsburgh and vic- 
inity and others are scattered in and 
about Erie, Oil City, W|ilkes-Barre and 
Johnstown. 

— — ■ 0-— ■ — 

The Alumni Associations of Harris- 
burg and Pittsburgh have both gone 
on record as approving President 
L-'homas' inaugural address and plan 
for a State University. They have 
pledged their support in any move that 
may be made in that direction. 
— — o — 

The Penn State players will give a 
free entertainment in the Auditorium 
on Saturday evening. Three one-act 
plays will be rendered by student tal- 
ent. 

o 

Professor Cowell lectured in Butler 
recently on "Landscape Architecture, 
Public and Private." He is developing 
seven acres of community playgrounds 
at Millville. 

o 

Professor Pattee will be the chapel 
speaker next Sunday. 



_n 



Published every Monday dur- 
ing the college year as a means 
of making official announce- 
ments and presenting' items of 
interest to the faculty 



e rer 



unsvivd 



axC 






Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
D. IvI. Cresswell, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME I 



State College, Pa., December 5, 1921 



NUMBER 9 



During the past week Harold .Silas 
Oliver, of the Senior class, Frederick 
Scholl Espenshade, of the Junior class, 
Paul W. Siard, Gerald Griffith Whit- 
ing and Herbert Oliver Wilson, of the 
Sophomore class, and Mabel Emma 
Yansant of the Freshman class, with- 
drew from sollege. 

A. H. ESPENSHADE, 

Registrar 



-o- 



There will he a meeting of the fa - 
nlty of the School of Agriculture and 
Experiment Station in Room 103 Ag- 
ricultural Building at 4:30 p. in., Wed- 
nesday, December 7. 

There will be a meeting of the Lib- 
eral Arts School faculty on Thursday, 
December 8th, at 4:30 p. in., in Room 
24, Liberal Arts Building. 



Regular meetings of the College Sen- 
ate will be held on the third Thursday 
of each month. The December meet- 
ing will be held at 7:30, Thursday, De- 
cember 15, in the Foyer of the Audi- 
torium. 



The first of the series of Tuesday 
evening free lecture courses of the 
School of Liberal Arts will be given 
in the Old Chapel at 7 o'clock Tues- 
day evening December G, when Dean 
Will Grant Chambers will speak on 
"The Educational Crisis." This will 
be the first opportunity for a State 
College audience to hear the new Dean 
of the Summer Session and Eucation- 
al Extension. 



William S. Taylor, assistant director 
of the teacher bureau, State Depart- 
ment of Public Education, will speak 
on "Certification and Teaching Oppor- 
tunities in Pennsylvania" at 7 o'clock 
Wednesday evening, December 7. 



PENN STATE 01* "WHITE LIST" 
Professor W. D. Crockett attended 
on November 26 the Autumn Confer- 
ence of the Classical Association of 
the Atlantic States which met at 
Swarthmore College in connection with 
the thirty-fifth annual convention of 
the Association of Colleges and Pre- 
paratory Schools of the Middle At- 
lantic States and Maryland. 

Penn State was included among 59 
instutions rated at this conference on 
the now famous "White List"— or 
colleges measuring up to the educa- 
tional standards established by th e as- 
sociation after four years' work. 



HONOR BE., AliMSBY'S' MEMORY 

Two hundred members of the Am- 
erican Society of Animal Production 
gathered in the banquet hall of the 
Saddle and Sirloin Club at the Union 
Stock Yards in Chicago, on November 
20 to honor the memory of the late 
Dr. H. P. Armsby. The occ ision had 
originally been planned as a testi 
ial for Dr. Armsby and Prof. J. H. 
Shepperd, of the North Dakota Agri- 
cultural College for his long s 
in scientific study. Dr. Armsby's 
death meanwhile caused a change in 
the nature of the gathering. A large 
portrait of each man was pres nted 
to the club and they now hang in its 
gallery with those of other men fa- 
mous for their work in animal studies. 

E. S. Bayard one of the college trus- 
tees, and editor of the National Stock- 
man and Farm , , u :si n ed the Arms- 
by picture and fittingly referred to 
the life and work of the former dir- 
ector of the Institute of Animal Nu- 
trition. A. H. Sanders, editor of the 
Breeders' Gazette, and president of 
the club, accepted the painting. Pro- 
fessor J. A. Fries, as the associate of 
Dr. Armsby, then spoke on the high 
character of his former chief and the 
value of his work. 

Penn State was represented at the 
business meeting of the association by 
H. H. Plavner, M. F. Grimes, J. A. 
Fries, W. W. Braman and E. M. Chris- 
ten. 

— o — 

WELFARE COMMITTEE MEETS 
The College Senate committee on 
Student Welfare in its first meeting 
made plans for a systematic study of 
strident problems arid conditions by 
assigning to respective members part- 
icular duties as follows: — Professor 
Fletcher (chairman), religious, moral 
and ethical relationships and prob- 
lems; Professor Simmons, cultural sur- 
vey and program; Professor Dusham, 
housing conditions, sanitation, and 
student health; Dean Knight, social 
affairs; Dean Wlarnock, fraternities 
and other organizations. 

Permits were granted for the organ- 
ization of a new local social fraternity, 
Delta Kappa Sigma, and the Penn 
State Training Camp Association. 
o 

FOUND — Ladies' umbrella in lecture 
room of Agricultural Building after 
Dr. Lee's lecture ■ last Wednesday 
night. Can be secured by identifica- 
tion at Professor Dutcher's office. 



Hon. Edward E. Keiss, of Wdlliamsport 
and E. S. Bayard, of Pittsburgh, were 
recently re-appointed Trustees of the 
College by Governor Sproul for terms 
of three years each. 



DESCRIBING METHOD OF 

CONDUCTING EXAMINATION S 

The attention of all members of the 
teaching staff is called to the fact that 
on May 31, 1921, the General Faculty 
voted that "the present Honor System 
be suspended, such suspension to take 
place immediately, and to continue un- 
til! such time as it shall be agreed by 
a two-thirds vote of the student body 
and a two-thirds vote of the Faculty 
that it shall be reinstate;!." 

The General Faculty further adopt- 
ed the l ill; wing res ' < as embody- 
ing a sa tisi acti >r} fe i; i a:y pi o :ed- 
ure in con iu< i ing ■ . ;: ns: 

"The principle that shall determine 
the method of conducting examina- 
tions and other la-.-. \v< .1. is the re- 
sponsibility of the school, the depart- 
ment, and the individual instructor for 
the integril 01 the grades i ported to 
the Registrar. Each instructor should 
satisfy himself that the; 'airly repre- 
sent the real attainment of the stu- 
dent. To this end, he shah conduct ex- 
aminations and other class work in 
the manner that seems to him best 
suited to the class and to the subject. 
The instructor may place students on 
their honor in examinations and other 
class work whenever, in his judgment, 
such a course may be followed with- 
out impairing the reliability of 
grades. It is the duty of every in- 
structor to report every instance of 
dishonesty in a test or examination to 
his department, which will report thru 
the Dean of the School to the Dean 
of Men or Dean of Women. It is also 
the duty of every instructor to main- 
tain quiet and order during the ex- 
amination period," 



SECOND SEMESTER SCHEDULE 

Department heads may see the sched- 
ule for the next semester at the of- 
fice of the Assistant Registrar, Dec- 
ember S, 9, and until noon of Decem- 
ber 10. 

If it is necessary for the instructor 
to have advance information about his 
individual schedule, he should ask the 
head of his department to secure a 
copy. 

The assistant Registrar will not be 
in his office during the Christmas va- 
cation. 

o 

XMAS PASTY AT U CLUB 
The Christmas Party at the Univ- 
ersity Club on December 15 will con- 
sist of dinner at six, an entertainment 
at eight, and dancing from nine to 
twelve. It will vary from the enter- 
tainment of former years in that it 
will not be a masquerade party, and 
in that the varsity and girls' quartets 
and the Penn State Players will fur- 
ish the entertainment. 



Published every Monday dur- 
ing the college year as a means 
of making official announce- 
ments and presenting items of 
interest to the faculty 



IT 



Pennsylvania 

'-ill 




Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
D. M. Cresswell, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME I 



State Coliege, Pa., December 12, 1921 



NUMBER 10 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

Vacation Regulations — Extensions of 
the Christmas vacation will be made 
only in very exceptional cases. 

The instructor's duty in the case of 
absentees is prescribed in section 17 
of the Regulations Affecting Students. 
No instructor shall readmit to a class 
a student who has been absent during 
the twenty-four hours preceding or 
succeeding the Christmas or Easier 
vacation, until the student presents to 
the instructor an excuse approved by 
the Committee of Deans (or their 
representatives), or s, permit of re- 
admission issued by the Dean of Men 
or the Dean of Women upon payment 
of a readmission fee of five dollars. In 
the latter case the absences are re- 
corded as unexcused. 

A. R. WARNOCK 

Dean of Men 

Senate Meeting' — The December 
meeting of the College Senate will be 
held on Thursday evening at 7:30 in 
the Foyer of the Audtiorium. 

Students Withdraw— The following 
students withdrew from college during 
the past week: Paul H. Long', of the 
Junior Class; James BelJ, Jr., Wiluert 
E. Corswirt, and Thomas E. Fitzger- 
ald, of the Sophomore Class; John S. 
Boozer, Georg-e Stevens and Paul F. 
Tig'h, of the Freshman Class. 

A. H. ESPENSHADE, 

Registrar 



DR. SPARKS ARMAMENT SPEAKER 
Dr. Sparks has been appointed a 
speaker by the General Committee on 
the Limitation of Armament of which 
Samuel Gompers is honorary chair- 
man. The committee will endeavor to 
keep the people informed concerning 
the progress of arms limitation even 
after the adjournment of the Confer- 
ence. 



PSYCHOLOGICAL TEST RESULTS 
The Department of Education and 
Psychology recently gave psychologi- 
cal tests to 882 Freshmen. The results 
of the test are in the hands of the 
several deans. Instructors may be 
helped to know better what to expect 
of their students by finding out the 
score made in these tests. 



"How to Listen to Music" is the 
subject of this week's Tuesday even- 
ing Liberal Arts lecture, to be given 
by Professor Robinson in Old Chapel 
at 7 o'clock. 



Next Bulletin— The next issue of the 
Faculty Bulletin will be dated Janu- 
ary 2. ' 



PRESIDENT THOMAS SPEAKS AT 

PENNA. SOCIETY DINNER 

President Thomas spoke at the an- 
nual Pennsylvania Society Dinner at 
the Waldorf-Astoria in New York City 
on last Saturday evening. He appear- 
ed upon the invitation of Charles M. 
Schwab. The occasion is a great an- 
nuo 1 affair, the society boasting over 
a thousand members. Rear Admiral 
Sims was also a dinner speaker. 

On Tuesday of this week President 
Thomas will address the annual meet- 
ing if the Pennsylvania State Grange 
at York. On December 22 he will ad- 
dress the 35th annual festival of the 
New England society of Northwestern 
Pennsylvania at Scranton. On the 
27th he will speak before the high 
school section of the Pennsylvania 
State Educational Association at Al- 
toona. 



Qif]rtsiinas Qfrfie'tnos 

The weeks have sped by rap- 
idly since the opening on Sept- 
ember 14, and much that we hop- 
ed to accomplish before the break 
in the year is still, undone; but 
on the other hand, we can look 
back upon some real achieve- 
ments and enter the holiday sea- 
son with glad hearts. Students 
have responded loyallj' to every 
appeal that has been made to 
them. The relation between 
Faculty and Students have been 
cordial and there is better un- 
derstanding of mutual respon- 
sibility. The academic organiza- 
tion has been improved and com- 
mittees are at work on construc- 
tive undertakings. A program 
for advancement to university 
standing has been kindly re- 
ceived and the people of the 
Commonwealth look to Penn 
State for great things. We are 
doing a larger work than ever 
before and we have a larger 
number of friends. There is 
every reason for a joyous Christ- 
mas. May joy and peace and 
hope dwell in every heart! 

JOHN M. THOMAS 



VACATION TRAINS 
A special train will leave Lemont on 
Friday evening at G o'clock for Wilkes- 
Barre and Harrisburg. Arrangements 
have been made for' Train 27 (west 
bound) to stop at Tyrone at 5:10 Fri- 
day afternoon. These are the only 
special vacation traffic arrangements 
made. There will be no specials for 
returning at the close of vacation. 



MEMORIAL RESOLUTIONS 

The special committee of the College 
Senate appointed to draw up an appro- 
priate memorial resolution on the 
death of Dr. Armsby, presented the 
following report which was adopted on 
November 22 by a unanimous rising 
vote : 

"Henry Prentiss Armsby — Sept- 
ember 21, 1S53 — October 19, 1921 
"Again within but a few months has 
the college suffered the loss of one of 
the senior members of its faculty. On 
Wedn&sday, October 19th, 1921, Henry 
Prentiss Armsby after an illness that 
had kept him from his work but a 
bri if period, passed to the great be- 
yond, aged sixty-eight years, twenty- 
eight days. 

"In length of service to the College, 
Dr. Armsby was outranked by only 
one other member of the faculty. He 
was elected Director of The Pennsyl- 
vania State College Experiment Sta- 
tion in October, 1S87, and served con- 
tinuously until 1907. He was Dean of 
the School of Agri-cult; :■. from 1896 
to 1902, and Director of t.je .. titute of 
Animal Nutrition from i.907 to his 
death. 

"In view of his long a cl distinguish- 
ed service to the College, his sound 
constructive judgement which has 
been relied upon in all councils, his 
gentle, lovable character which made 
him a friend of every student and 
member of the faculty, we, his col- 
leagues of the Academic Senate, 
desire to record our deep sense of 
grief at his loss from our circle, and 
to give unstinted expression to our 
gratitude for the example of his schol- 
arly, manly life. 

"His death brings a loss to the Col- 
lege that cannot be replaced, but as 
compensation, he has dowered us, with 
what is more priceless than any mat- 
erial endowment, the memories of his 
gentle life, his deep scholarship, his 
love for the truth, his devotion to the 
highest ideals of education and his 
unswerving faith in the College to 
which he freely gave the best years 
of his life. 

"The Academic Senate most heartily 
adopts this tribute of honor and es- 
teem, and directs that it be spread 
upon the Records, and a copy sent to 
the family of Dr. Armsby." 
— o 

"Health Education" is the subject 
of a series of talks to be given Tues- 
day, Wednesday and Thursday after- 
noons at 4:30 in Old Chapel by Dr. 
C. H. Keen, director of the Bureau of 
Health, State Department of Educa- 
tion. He is here under the auspices 
of the Department of Education and 
Psychology. 



Published every Monday dur- 
ing the college year as a means 
of making official announce- 
ments and presenting items of 
interest to the faculty 



The Pennsylvania State College 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
D. M. Cresswell, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME I 



State College, Pa., January 3, 1921 



NUMBER 11 



DEAN MOOEE WHITES BOOK 

Dean Moore, following a general de- 
mand for a handy volume which -would 
bring together the main facts relating 
to coal, has prepared a book which, 
presents in compact form the salient 
facts and theor.es that have to do with 
this very necessary 'material. The 
"Wiley Bulletin" says: 

"Dean Moore 'has treated his subject 
in a practical way, so that the book 
appeals both to the scientific and 'to ithe 
practical man, besides serving the pur- 
pose of a text for classes in this sub- 
ject. The chapter headings show how 
wide a field the author has covered in 
his endeavor to make the book really 
comprehensive. There are many illus- 
trations taken from a great variety of 
domestic and foreign sources. In addi- 
tion there are a number of valuable 
maps, which 'Show the distribution of 
the various types of coal in practically 
every country in the world." 
o — ■ — 

Jan. 23 to 27 will be red letter days 
for Penn State in Harrisburg. The 
College Trustees meet on the 24th and 
the Harrisburg section of the alumni 
association will hold their annual ban- 
cmet oTT the 2Gth. The week is the 
occasion for the sixth annual Farm 
Products Show under the auspices of 
the Pennsylvania Department of Agri- 
culture and the Pennsylvania State 
College. A large number of Agricul- 
tural School faculty men and exten- 
sion representatives will speak. 



Dr. Sp irks will talk on "Horace 
Greely, the Reform Editor" at next 
week's Tuesday evening lecture in Old 
Chapel, January 10. 



The Rght Reverend Bishop Talbot, 
of Bethlehem, will be the chapel speak- 
er next Sunday. President Thomas 
will deliver the sermon at the Pine 
Street Presbyterian Church, (Harris- 
burg,, on that day. 



H. C. Mc Williams, county agent in 
Cambria county, has been elected 
secretary' of the National County 
Agents' Association. 



Professor Kunze, Industrial Engin- 
eering Department, completed a 340 
mile horseback trip last Thursday from 
Amherst, Va. He had purchased the 
horse from Rev. Mr. Zachary, formerly 
of State College, and though the mur- 
cury flirted with zero, he reports a 
fine trip. 



STATE COLLEGE LOCAL BRANCH 

OE A, A. A. S. AL'TIIOEIZEI) 

The Executive Committee of Ithei 
Council of the American Associaton for 
the Advancement of Science has au- 
thorized the forming of a section, to be 
known as "The Stale College Local 
Branch". This is the first branch 
authorized by the National Association 
and its aim will be to promote scien- 
tific work, particularly research, at! 
The Pennsylvania S;:ite College. 

The Branch will receive a part of the 
annual dues for its local expenses. 
Any member of the National Associa- 
tion at State College may become a 
member of the new Branch. A com- 
mittee, of which Dr. Runkle is Chair- 
man, has prepared a draft of the Con- 
stitution for the Branch, and a meet- 
ing of the forty or more local members 
will soon be called to complete the 
organization. 

The following are the sections of the 
A. A. A. S.: 

Section A (Mathematics), B ( Phys- 
ics), C (Chemistry), D (Astronomy), 
E (Geology and Geography), F (Zo- 
ology), G (Botany), H (Authropology), 
I (Psychology), K (Social and Eco- 
nomic Sciences), iL (Historical find 
Philological Sciences), M (Engineer- 
ing), N (Medical Sciences), O (Agri- 
culture) and Q (Education). 

The secretary, Dr. J. Ben Hill will 
givey information regarding the new 
Branch and will send application 
blanks to those who apply for member- 
ship,. Those who join prior to the 
formal organizaton, will come in as 
Charter Members. 



-o- 



E. K. Hibshman, Assistant to the 
President in Public Relatons, is secre- 
tary of the Pennsylvania State Farm 
Products Show, and is completing ar- 
rangements for the sixth annual show 
at Harrisburg the last week of Janu- 
ary. He is also secretary of the re- 
cently appointed State Fair Commis- 
sion, selected by the Governor through 
legislative action. 

o 



Hugo Bezdek and Neil Fleming at- 
tended meetings last week in New York 
City of the National Collegiate Athletic 
Association and of the Society of Di- 
rectors of Physical Education in Col- 
leges. 

— o 

President Thomas and a number of 
faculty members attended the Pennsyl- 
vania State Educational Association 
gathering in Altoona last week. Dean 
Chambers was elected a member of the 
legislative committee. The Modern 
Language Department elected Profes- 
sor I. L. Foster as president. 



FOREIGN -BOEN STUDENTS 
There are now 36 foreign-born 
students at The Pennsylvania State 
College. Russia leads with 3; Italy 
and Austria have 3 each; Canada and 
England, 2 each; and the following 
countries one each: Donmark, Fin- 
land, Germany, Holland, Ireland,, 
Japan, Liberia, Mexico, Norway, Pales- 
tine, Poland, Spain, Syr.a, and Turkey. 



FINAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 
First Semester 1921-1922. 

On Wednesday, January IS, at 12 
noon, recitations and pra.. .icum for the 
first semester will end. 

Final examinations for all students 
will be given beginning Wednesday, 
January 18, at 1:30 p. m., and ending 
Saturday, January 28, at 5:30 p. m. 

Conflicts, in order to be adjusted, 
must be reported at the registrar's of- 
fice on a special form there provded, 
beiore noon Saturday, January 14. 

Tile following examinations will be 
scheduled by the instructors concerned: 
Bib. Lit. Greek 

Bot. 15 Hist. 30 

Ed. 1, 5 Latin 

Fl. Mllg. Met. 502, 503 

Forest 22, 50, 203/200 Phil. 19 

Wednesday, January 18, 1:30 P. M. 

Agro. 28 105 Hort. 

A. H. 17 103 Ag. 

A. H. 207 200 Hort, 

Chem. Ag. 25 206 Ag. 

Com. 17 14, 28 L. A. 

D. H. 201 100 Hort. 

Dom. Sci. 49 306 Main 

E. E. 8 Amp. 

Engl. 467 311 Main 

Hist. 1 11, 12 C. A. 

Math. 7 314 Main 

Math 11 315 Main 

Psy. 14 22, 25 L. A. 

Zool. 203 28 Phys., 4 McA. H. 

Thursday, January 19, 8:30 A. M. 

Agro. 2S 200 Hort. 

Agro. 206 206 Ag. 

A. H. 6 103 Ag. 

Chem. Ag. 4 105 Hort. 

Com. 5 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. 7, 8 L. A. 

Com. 15 20, 25 L. A. 

Com. 30 11, 12, 13, 15, 16, 19 L. A. 

Dom. Sci. 41 306 Main 

Econ. 15 200 Eng. D. 

Econ. 21 22, 28 L. A. 

Engl. 4 Amp., 100 Hort., 206, 219, 

302, 304, 311, 314, 315, 320, 321, 437, 
438, 440 Main, 10, 11, 12 C. A. 

Forest. 9, 33 For. 

Geol. 75... 119 Mng. A. 

Met. 78 104 Mng. A. 

Mng. 71 101 Mng. A. 

(Over) 



(Examination Schedule Continued) 
Thursday. January 19, 1:30 P. M. 

Agro. 1 206 A =- 

Agro. 201 103 A §'- 

Ed. 25 28 Phys. 

Engl. 1 Amp., 100, 105. 106, 200, 

202 Hon.. 206, 219, 302, 304, 311, 314, 

315, 320. 321. 437, 43S, 440 Main, 9, 10, 

11, 12 C. A. 

Hist. 4 L. A., except room 2S 

Ht. Eng. 34 201 Mng. B 

L. g. 2 205 Hort. 

Met. 59 101 . 1° 4 Mn »- A - 

Phil. 1 310 Main 

., i_ 28 L. A. 

Friday, January 20, 8:30 A. M. 

Ag. Ed. 11 106 Hort. 

\. H. 15 200 Hurt. 

Chem. 443 11, 12 C. A. 

Com. 20 200 Eng. D 

Dom. Sci. 31 314 Main 

K. E. 7 200, 206 Eng. E 

E. E. IS 211 Eng. D 

Engl. 215 100 Hort. 

I'.: .st. 3. 13. 61 For. 

Ht. Eng. 30 209, 210 Eng. C 

Hyd. 11 205 Eng. A 

Mens. 2 Amp. 

P. H. 5. 205 202 Hurt. 

Pol. Sci. 17 2s L. A. 

Pair. Eco. 201 206 Ag. 

Str. 31 201, 203. Eng. A 

Friday. January -20, 1:3(1 P. M. 

Dom. Art. 37 28 L. A. 

D. H. 13 103, 206 Ag. 

Fr. 11 200, 219, 226, 302, 304, 314, 

315 Main. 

Fr. 13 100, 105, 106, 200 Hort. 

Fr. 23 9, 10, 11, 12 C. A. 

Fr. 25 25 P. A. 

Fr. 231 251 Dairy 

Ger. 1 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 P. A. 

Ger. 3 6. 7, 8, 11, 12 P. A. 

Ger. 50 13 P. A. 

Ger. 55 _ 15 P. A. 

Ger. 56 16 P. A. 

I. E. 706 201, 203, 205, 207 Eng A, 

201, 207. 208. 209. 210 Eng. C. 

Phys. 107 _ 28 Phys. 

Sp. 11 Amp., 200 Eng. D 

Sp. 13 259 Dairy 

Sp. 23 311, 316, 320, 321, 437, 438, 

440 Main, 4 McA. H. 

Sp. 25 310 Main 

Sp. 231 104 Mng. A 

Saturday, January 21, 8:30 A. M. 
A. E. 20 24 Eng. F 

Ag. Ed. 15 106 Hort. 

A. H. 206 104 Hort. 

Chem Ag. 28 202 Hort. 

Dom. Sci. 44 311 Main 

D m. Sci. 45 310 Main 

Econ. 14 Amp., 11, 12 C. A. 

Engl. 14 220 Main 

M. Des. 12 209 Eng. C 

Min. 53 101, 104 Mng. A 

Pol. Sci. 1 100 Hort., 206 Ag. 

R. P- 14 200, 202 Eng. D 

Saturday, January 21, 1:30 P. M. 

Bact. 2 251, 259 Dairy, 100 Hort. 

Ohem. 333-34 1, 2, 3, 4 E. A. 

Chem. Ag. 13 103 Ag. 

Dom. Sci. 35 310 Man 

l: E. 3 200 Eng. D 

Engl. 301 25 L. A. 

Hort. 8 mt Hort. 

Ht. Eng. 13 207, 208, 209, 210 Eng. C 

lit. ICng. 17 5, 6, 7, 8, 11, 12, 13 L. A. 

Hyg. 1 Men, Amp., 100, 105, 106, 200, 

202 Hort., 206, 219, 302, 304, 311, 314, 
315, 320, 321, 437, 440 Main, 9, 10, 11, 



12 C A. Women, 4 McA. H., 2S Phys. 

Met. 51 104 Mng A. 

p H ->o3 105 Hort. 

Pnil. "5" 19 L - A - 

Soc. 2 2S L. A. 

Sur 40 201, 203 Eng. A 

Monday. January 23, 8:30 A. M. 

A?. Ed. 16 104 Hort. 

A o T0 24 1° 3 A §'- 

Agro. 203 206 Ag. 

v H 201 10 ° Hort 

D. H. 10...... 251, 259 Dairy 

Dom." Art. 22 25 P. A. 

Dom. Sci. 25 25 L. A. 

Ech. E. 2 200 Eng. E 

Econ. 35 13. 14, 15 P. A. 

E. e. 1 200, 213 Eng. D, 205, 207 

Eng. A. 

Engl. 305 300 Main 

Forest. 48, 53, 62 For. 

H. Eco. 25 25 P. A. 

Ht. Eng. 4 207, 208, 209, 210 Eng. C 

Ht. Eng. 6 104, 200 Mng. A 

Hyd. 1 201, 203 Eng. A 

Math. 10 Amp. 

r> sy . 21 19 L. A. 

R. M. E. 7 211 Eng. D 

Monday, January 23, 1:30 P. M. 

Agro. 10 251, 259 Dairy 

A. H. 1 206 Ag., 100 Hort. 

Chem. 141, 142 Am.p. 

Chem. Ag. 18 106 Hort. 

D. H. 211 104 Hort. 

Em E. 5 2(H). 200 Eng. E 

Hist. 19 1. 2. 3, 1, 5, 6 L. A. 

Hist. 23 7, 8 L. A. 

Ht. Eng. 35 209, 210 Eng. C 

Math. 5 206, 219, 226, 302, 304, 306, 

30S, 311, 314, 315, 316, 320, 321, 437, 
43S. 440- Main, 4, 9, 10, 11. 12 C. A. 

Math. 29 13, 14 P. A. 

Met. 71 101 Mng. A 

Phys. 301 40 Phys. 

Phvs. 305 28 Phys. 

Sur. 15 201, 203 Eng. A 

Zool. 317, 405 4 McA. H. 

Tuesday, January 21, 8:30 A. M. 

Agro. 210 103 Ag. 

Bot. 201 259 Dairy, 206 Ag. 

Com. 25 100 Hort. 

Dom. Sci. 31 302 Main 

E. E. 5 200 Eng. D 

Engl. 321 314 Main 

Forest. 54 For. 

Geol 41 101 Mng. A, 201 Mng. B 

Geol. 81 104, 200 Mng. A 

Hist. 20 Amp. 

Hyd. 5 201, 203 Eng. A 

Hyd. 15 205 Eng. A 

M. Des. 31 207, 208, 209, 210 Eng. C 

M. Des. 51 200, 206 Eng. E 

Mng. 75 119 Mng. A 

P. H. 6 104 Hort. 

Pol. Sci. 20 28 P. A. 

R. M. E. 1 207 Eng. A, 24 Eng. F 

Rur. Eco. 1 200 Hort. 

Str. 33 1 202 Eng. D 

Tuesday, January 24, 1:30 P. M. 

A. H. 1 100 Hort., 206 Ag. 

A. H. 7 103 Ag. 

Chem. 131, 132 9, 10, 11, 12 C. A. 

Ed. 2 12, 13, 14 P. A. 

Geol. 57 101 Mng. A 

Hist. 20 314, 315 Main, 1, 2, 3, 4, 

5, 6, 7, 25, 28 L. A. 

Hort. 27 104 Hort. 

Met. 72 104 Mng. A 

M. Des. 12 209, 210 Eng. C 

Phys. 201 28, 40 Phys., 302, 304, 

306 Main. 

Pur. Eco. 201 200 Hort. 

Zool. 101 Amp. 

Zool 313 4 McA. H. 



Wednesday, January 25, 8:30 A. M. 

A. H. 3 206 Ag. 

A. H. 217 103 Ag. 

Dom. Sci. 41 310 Main 

^4_ 22 28 L. A. 

Engl. 412 306 Main 

Forest. 59, 60 For. 

Ht. Eng. 26 200 Eng. D 

I. e. 811 207, 208 Eng. C 

Mens. 7 205, 207 Eng. A 

M. Des. 55 209, 210 Eng. C 

Min 83 101 Mng. A 

Phys. 211 Amp., 28 Phys. 

Str. 13 201, 203 Eng. A 

Zool. 411 4 McA. H. 

Wednesday. January 25, 1:30 P. M. 

Bot. 10 314, 315, 316 Main 

Chem. 121, 122 Amp., 100 Hort. 9, 

10. 11. 12 C. A., 200 Eng. D, 206, 219, 
226, 302, 304, 311 Main. 

Ed. 11 14, 25 «D. A. 

E. E. 10 200 Eng. E 

Geol. 51 104 Mng. A 

Hort. 0, 206 200 Hort. 

Math. 2 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, S, 11, 12, 

13 L. A. 

Met. 54 101 Mng. A 

Mng. 51 200 Mng. A 

Phys. 217 - 28 Phys. 

Phvs. 231 40 Phys., 4, S C. A 

Psy. 13 19 P. A. 

Rnr. Eco. 1 105 Hort. 

Thursday, January 20, 8:30 A. M. 

A. E. 19 24 Eng. F 

Dot. 11 10 C. A. 

Chem. 373 11 C. A. 

Chem. Ag. 208 100 Hort. 

Dom. Sci. 4S 219 Main 

Econ. 1 - Amp. 

Forest. 69 For. 

Hyd. 12 200 Eng. D 

Met. 61 101, 104 Mng. A 

Mng. 77 200 Mng. A 

Phys. 2 1. 2, 3, 4, 5, 14, 25, 28 L. A. 

R. R. 1 201, 203 Eng. A 

Thursday, January 20, 1:30 P. M. 

Bot. 1 Amp. 

Com. 42 25, 28 P. A. 

E. E. 12 200, 206 Eng. E 

Hort. 13 202 Hort. 

Ht. Eng. 30 200 Eng. D 

Hwy. 7 201 Eng. A 

Min. 31 104 Mng. A 

Min 51 200 Mng. A 

Min. 56 101 Mng. A 

P. H. 1 100 Hort. 

P. H. 7, 207 104 Hort. 

Friday, January 27, 8:30 A. M. 

Agro. 3 103 Ag. 

Chem. 237-42, 283-84 100 Hort. 

Chem. 277-80, 321-22 100 Hort. 

D. H. 5 251 Dairy 

Engl. 465 314 Main 

Geol. 31 Amp. 

Hist. 24 28 P. A. 

Hort. 208 104 Hort. 

Met. 73 104 Mng. A 

Friday, January £7, 1: 30 P. M. 

A. H. 12 103 Ag. 

A. H. 14 202 Hort. 

A. H. 215 206 Ag. 

Chem. 229 , Amp. 

P. G. 7 200 Hort. 

Met. 53 104 Mng. A 

Phys. 303 : 28 Phys. 

Saturday, January 28, 8:30 A. M, 

Agro. 16 103 Ag. 

Bot. 7 12 C. A. 

Com. 40 25, 28 P. A. 

Engl. 45S. 314 Main 



Published every Monday dur- 
ing the college year as a means 
of making official announce- 
ments and presenting items of 
interest to the faculty 




Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
D. M. Cresswell, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME I 



State College, Pa., January 9, 192* 



NUMBER 12 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

Senate Meeting' — The January meet- 
ing of the College Senate will be held 
Thursday evening, January 19. 
o — 

Students WiUulraw — The following 
students withdrew from college during 
the past week: 

Junior — D,roz Brua Snyder. 

Sopliclmores — Thomas Joseph Finne- 
gan ; Amelia Prances Schuler and 
Charles Clifford Wolfe. 

Freshmen — William Adam Grill, Jr.; 
John George Sherman and James El- 
mer Tays. 

1st Year 2 Yr. Ag\. — Harry Rawlin 

Janrett and Charles Esrorn Landis. 

Special — John Thomas Simon Reese. 
A. H. ESPENSHADE, Registrar. 



PHI BETA KAPPA A. A. 

The Phi Beta Kappa members of the 
faculty gathered at the University Club 
before the holidays and organized the 
Phi Beta Kappa Alumni Association 
of the Pennsylvania State College. Ov- 
er thirty members were present, the 
cause for the occasion being the cele- 
bration of the 145th anniversary of the 
society. Addresses were made by 
President Thomas, Dr. Sparks and 
I Dean Sioddart, while Professor Mar- 
quarcit acted as toastmaster. 

The officers, who will also act as the 
executive committee of the association 
are: C. E. Marquardt, president; R. 
E. Dengler, secretary and C. W. Hasek, 
treasurer. Two meetings will be held 
during the second semeter, one of them 
of a literary nature. 



SI' WAY CONCERTS 

The Dep irtment of Music has ar- 
ranged the following Sunday after- 
noon conce ts to start at 3:30: 

January 22— College Band. 

February 5— College Orchestra. 

February 2- -Organ Chorus. 

February 19— Organ Recital. 

February 26— Glee Club. 

March 12 -Mandolin Club. 



All persons interested in joining the 
local branch of the American Asso- 
ciation for the Advancement of 
Science, arc requested to hand their 
applications to the acting secretary, Dr. 
Hill before .Tan. 19 as a meeting for or- 
ganization will be called at that time. 
Applicants upon election to member- 
Ship will become charter members of 
the chapter. 



The annual meeting for the elec- 
tion of officers of the University Club 
will be held at 'the club Monday, Jan. 
0.6, at 7:30 p. in. 



DR. WILLIAM FREAR 

The names of William Frear, Henry 
Prentiss Armsby and George Gilbert 
Pond are three that will live forever 
in the annals of Penn State; they will 
also go down in history as three of 
the best known and honored scientists 
of their day. 

The loss by death of each of these 
men in turn, which has occurred with- 
in the short space of less than twenty 
months, has indeed been a blow to the 
college The totally unexpected death 
of Dr. Frear of apoplexy early Satur- 
day morning marked the passing of 
the last of the three oldest faculty 
members in point of (Service whose ef- 
forts have brought international rec- 
ognition to this collegia. Dr Frear 
came to Penn State as a professor of 
agricultural chemistry in 1885; Dr. 
Armsby started his career here in 1887 
and Dr. Pond joined the faculty in 1888. 
Dr. Frear was the first of the three 
to come and the last to be lost. He 
was in his thirty-seventh year of ser- 
vice, and was vice-director of the ag- 
ricultural experiment station for 35 
; ears of that time. 

Only a few months ago Dr. Frear 
supplied the news editor's office with 
his biographical record as follows: 

Born in Reading, Pa., March 24, 18G0. 
Degree of B. A. from Bueknell Univer- 
sity, 1881; Ph.D., Illinois Wesleyan, 
1883. Fraternities — Phi Kappa Psi, 
Phi Kappa Phi (charter), Alpha Zeta 
and Alphi Chi Sigma. Honors — Classi- 
fication uncertain; Recent: Gold Medal 
for service, Lancaster County Tobacco 
Growers' Association. 

He wrote no books — scientific rec- 
ports only. His principal investgiations 
included: Digestibility and composi- 
tion of soiling crops; nitrogen supplies 
of maize; intensive study of composi- 
tion of grasses (method followed by 
later investigations) ; detection of vine- 
gar adulteration (part of present offi- 
cial plan) ; effect of acid treatment up- 
on availbillty of organic nitrogenous 
fertilizers; limestone resources of Penn- 
sylvania; sampling soils for analysis; 
movement of lime in soil; fineness as 
it affects availability of limestone. 

His tobacco work, for which he was 
greatly respected in tobacco growing 
sections of the state, included: Effect 
of fertilizers upon yield and quality; 
economy of tobacco production ; shade 
growing of tobacco in Pennsylvania; 
strain selection to increase yield; cur- 
ing methods. 

He was chemist for the Pennsylvania 
State Board of Agriculture, 1889 — 1909; 
Chemist, Pennsylvania Bureau of 
Foods, 1895 — 1922; President, Associa- 
tion of Official Agricultural Chemists, 
1897; Editor, 1920— -1922; former vice- 
president of American Association of 
Agricultural Colleges and Experiment 
Stations; President, Society for the 
Promotion of Agricultural Sciences, 



1904 — 1905; Chairman, National Food 
Standards Commiss on. 1893 — 1897; 
Member, Joint Committee on Food Def- 
initions and Standards, 1913 — 1922; 
Chemist to Pennsylvania Fertilizer 
Control Board, 1889—1916; Chemist, 
Cattle Food Control Board, 1902—04. 

By selection: F. A. S. S.; member, 
Society for the Promotion of Agricul- 
tural Science; Washington Academy of 
Sciences; Cosmos Club, Washington 
and University Club, ftate College; 
member ordinary of various oilier learn- 
ed societies and ex-officio of several 
official societies. 

Funeral services will be held this 
(Monday) afternoon at tihe Pugh street 
residence followed by college memor- 
ial services at 4 o'clock in Old Chapel. 
The body goes to Wilkes-Barre for 
burial, where brief services will be 
held Tuesday afternoon. 



MID-YEAR GRADUATE 

LIST IS ANNOUNCED 

The attention of all instructors is 
called to (the following list of 63 Sen- 
iors who expect to finish their course 
and get their degree at the approach- 
ing Mid- Year Convocation. 

The grades of these Seniors should 
be reported on a separate -sheet [mark- 
ed "Mid- Year Graduates," in order that 
they may be recorded ait once, with- 
out being sorted out from a multi- 
tude of grade sheets belonging mainly 
to other students. 

No grades of mid-year graduates 
should reach ihe Registrar's office 
later than 9 a. m., Saturday, January 
28. 



Armes, M. J. 
Bailey, J. A. 
Baily, R. W. 
Baturin, A. R. 
Barnett, Mabel. 
Benner, J. A. 
Brunner, H. R. 
Bullinger, C. E. 
Butler, C. C. 
Chase, D. K. 
Clark, J. I. 
Culbertson, R. E. 
Detar, D. D. 
Diesel, F. H. 
Donovan, J. M. 
Enoch, D. G. 
Frank, W. E. 
Frommeyer, A. S. 
Gardiner, J. A. 
Good, H. P. 
Hanneman, W. M. 
Harris, S. G. 
Heckel, F. P. 
Hills, L. G. 
Hoffer, LeRoy. 
Holder, W. P. 
Jones, W. J., Jr. 
Junk, R. H. 
Killinger, W. G. 
Kranich, S. 
Kuhn, C. E. 

Wagner. 



Leete, Helen. 
Letchwnrth, G. E. 
Lewis, W. S. 
Lloyd, L. E. 
MacKenzie, J. B. 
MacMillan, D. C. 
Major, W. R. 
Mathews, G. B. 
'Mathews, W. A. 
Mi'!ler. F. K. 
Miller, H. R. 
Newell, W. K. 
Newman, Agnes 
Newton, H. L. 
Pershing, C. H. 
Rieve, Hugo 
Ross, W„ A. 
Schroeder, M. V. 
Lihaw. W. J. 
Shellito, H. L. 
Shelton, Annie E. 
Shultz, W. W. 
Smith, S. R. 
Spaeth, A. D. 
Stengel, J. C. 
Strawn, E. J. 
Tait, M. P. 
Terwilliger, E. M. 
Tipper, W. J. 
Trebswether, P. F. 
Van Syckel, R. E. Jr 
Reinhold. 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
D. M. Cresswell, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME I 



State College, Pa., January 17, 1922 



NUMBER 13 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

Semite Meeting' — The January meet- 
ing of the College Senate will be held 
on next Thursday evening, January IS, 
at 7:30 in the Foyer of the Auditorium. 



Educational Conference — Members of 
the teaching staff are asked to reserve 
Wednesday evening, February 1, for 
an important educational conference 
with representatives of the State De- 
partment of Public Instruction. A de- 
tailed announcement will be made in 
next week's Bulletin. 



Second Semester Registration — Reg- 
istration Days for the second semester 
are Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and 
Saturday (until noon), January 18-21. 
Registration posters giving detailed in- 
formation have been put up on all bul- 
letin boards and in the deans' offices. 
The work of the second semester will 
begin at 8 A. M. on Monday, January 
30. On and after that time all stu- 
dents are required to present to in- 
structors properly approved schedule 
cards indicating that their college bills 
have been paid. 



Mid-Year Graduates — The attention 
of instructors is once more called to 
the list of candidates for graduation at 
mid-year given in last week's Faculty 
Bulletin, and to the special directions 
for reporting their grades. To this list 
should be added the names of Miss 
Beatrice T. Bastian and Miss Adda M. 
Quandcl and Ho Tieng Ho. 



Students Withdraw — During the past 
week the following students withdrew 
from college: 

Juniors — Thomas Allan Murray and 
Edgar Blake'ly Shuck. 

Sophomore — Leonard Ellwood Apple- 
gate. 

Freshmen - - William Tschirchky 
Adams, William Albert Eason, Jr., 
Louis Montfort Florian and Bruce Nor- 
man Steele. 

A. S. ESPENSHADE, Registrar. 
o 

Bulletin Hated Tuesday — For all 

around convenience, the Faculty Bul- 
letin will be dated in the future on the 
Tuesday of the week in which it is is- 
sued, instead of Monday. It is impos- 
sible to get the publication in the mail 
before Tuesday morning. 

The Modern Languages Club of the 
Faculty will meet in the Foyer of the 
Auditorium tonight (Tuesday) at 7 
o'clock. President Foster announces 
that an interesting program has been 
prepared. 



NO CHAPEL SERVICES— There 
will be no chapel service during exam- 
inations. The dates on which daily 
chapel will be omitted are January 19, 
20, 23, 24, 26, and 27. 

There will be no chapel services 
Sunday, January 22. 

Sunday, January 29th, the 11 a. m. 
chapel will take the form of a Bacca- 
laureate service, at which President 
Thomas will speak. All are invited. 



'i 



"FAMOUS PENNSTLVANIANS" is 
the subject of the Liberal Arts lecture 
in Old Chapel at 7 o'clock tomorrow 
night. Professor Espenshade will be 

the speaker. Note the change from 
Tuesday to Wednesday in the date. 

— o 



Tea For Loan Fund — The State Col- 
lege Branch of the American Associa- 
tion of University Women, in coopera- 
tion with the Art Department of the 
College, will give a Studio Tea, Wed- 
nesday evening, Jan. 18, 7:30 to 9:30 
in the Old Main Art Museum. A sil- 
ver collection will be taken for the 
benefit of the Loan Fund for women 
students. There has been an unusual 
demand this year upon the loan fund, 
owing to general business conditions. 
There are many more demands that 
can be filled, and it is imperative that 
some relief be given, for the funds are 
a.bout exhausted. All are cordially in- 
vited to attend the tea. 

— o — 

Professors Charles A. Hunter and 
Martin H. Ivnusten attended the recent 
annual meeting of the Society of 
American Bacteriologists in Philadel- 
phia. Mr. Hunter presented a paper 
entitled "General Bacteriology in the 
Curriculum." The discussion ,of his 
paper led to the appointment of a 
committee of which Professor Hunter 
was named secretary. The work of 
this committee will be investigation of 
the manner in which bacteriology is 
taught in American Colleges and Uni- 
versities, with a view to establishing 
greater uniformity in methods of pre- 
senting the subject of bacteriology. 



Some of the students in the Horti- 
cultural Department have been can- 
ning fruits and vegetables, and mak- 
ing fruit preserves and juices. These 
products are very attractive and are 
now for sale. Samples may be seen in 
Room I, Horticultural Building. 



Edgar A. Guest, the poet-lecturer, 
will give the next Music Department 
— Y. M. C. A. entertainment course at- 
traction in the Auditorium next Sat- 
urday evening. 



A YEAR, IN ITALY 

Professor W. D. Crockett, of the 
Classical Languages- Department, has 
applied for leave of absence for the 
academic year 1922-1923, and will 
spend the year in Rome, Italy. Pro- 
fessor and Mrs. Crockett will sail as 
soon as possible after Commencement 
in June, and will be gone for about 
fifteen months. Professor Crockett 
will conduct a party of American 
travelers through Europe each sum- 
mer, and during the academic year 
will be occupied in study in the Ameri- 
can School for Classical Studies in 
Rome, Mrs. Crockett will devote her 
attention to the study ot art With 
Rome as their headquarters, the 
Crocketts will make many excursions 
with the faculty and members of the 
American School to points of historic 
interest in and near Rome, including 
trips to Naples and Pompeii, to Sicily 
and to Greece. 

— o — — — — 

Philadelphia and Pike counties are 
the only ones of the 67 in the State 
that do not have a Farm Bureau. Cam- 
eron was the latest to join the ranks a 
week ago. Only three counties with 
Farm Bureaus are without County Ag- 
ents, making Pennsylvania, through 
the efforts of the college Agricultural 
Extension Department, probably the 
most thoroughly organized in the coun- 
try. 



<> 



There are 378 students enrolled in 
Industrial Education department class- 
es in ten cities in the central part of 
the state. Classes are held locally, 
each week, for four hours. 
— — o 

J. J. Winchester, formerly with the 
IT. S. Government in the Philadelphia 
Navy Yard, and later with the Gov- 
ernment in the Canal Zone, has been 
appointed an assistant in Industrial 
Education, with headquarters in Har- 
risburg. 

The organ in a nearby rural school- 
house Sunday school has "expired" The 
Y. M. C. A. would appreciate informa- 
tion leading to the borrowing, dona- 
tion or purchase at low cost of a ser- 
viceable organ. Phone the Hut. 



(i 



The Y. M. C. A. would welcome used 
magazines, such as "American," 
"World's Wiork," etc. Phone the Hut, 
telling when and where to call each 
month. 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



tinsyivania 




Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
D. M. Cresswell, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME I 



State College, Pa., January 24, 1922 



NUMBER 14 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

Special Meeting of the General Fac- 
ulty — The President of the College has 
issued a special call for a meeting of 
all members of the teaching staff in 
the Old Chapel at 7:30 on Wednesday 
evening, February 1, to consider the 
correlation of the work of the public 
high schools of the State with the work 
of The Pennsylvania State College. At 
this meeting the chief speaker will be 
Dr. William D. Lewis, Deputy State 
Superintendent of Public Instruction in 
charge of secondary education. Dr. 

Lewis is anxious to have all instruc- 
tors in the State College fully inform- 
ed concerning the aims, the problems, 
and the proposed curriculum of the 
public high schools of Pennsylvania. 
The members of the teaching staff are 
asked to come prepared to discuss the 
question of college admission and the 
best way of relating the work of the 
high schools with that of the college, 
and of making the transition from the 
secondary school to college work. 



-o- 



Senate Actions — At the meeting of 

the College Senate last Thursday it 
was decided to recommend to the 
Board of Trustees "that the name of 
the curriculum Landscape Gardening 
be changed to Landscape Architec- 
ture." and that "Architectural Engi- 
neering" be changed to "Architec- 
ture." A large number of graduate 
courses were approved. Professors 
Walker and Espenshade and Dean 
Warnock were appointed as a College 
Calendar Committee. A committee 
was authorized to draw up Senate 
resolutions in memory of Dr. William 
Frear. 



Students Withdraw — During the past 
week the following students have with- 
drawn from college : 

Sophomores — Henry Richard John- 
son, Jr.; Hubert Francis Johnson and 
Newlin Kenneth Mehaffie. 

Freshmen — Samuel Power Finley 
and Robert Paul Smith. 

A. H. ESPENSHADE, Registrar. 

Summer Session Ranks High — The 
Journal of the National Education As- 
sociation contains a resume of the 410 
institutions which had teummer ses- 
sions in 1921, with a total attendance 
of 253,110 students. In the order of 
enrollment, the Pennsylvania State 
College stands 18th, with only one col- 
lege, Iowa, having a larger attendance. 
Pennsylvania State College has the 
largest enrollment of any institution 
in Pennsylvania, having increased 
from 1,306 to 1,905 between 1920 and 
1921. 



MANY ATTEiM) ANNUAL 

FARM PRODUCTS SHOW 

President Thomas. Dean Watts, and 
a large number of the agricultural 
school faculty and extension force will 
attend meetings this week at the Har- 
risburg Farm Products Show. Presi- 
dent Thomas speaks to the opening as- 
sembly tonight, to the State Holstein- 
Fresian Association Wednesday night 
and to the Penn State alumni at the 
mid-winter banquet on Thursday night. 
He is on the program with Governor 
Sproul tonight and with Former-Gov- 
ernor Frank E. Lowden, of Illinois, 
tomorrow night. Dean "Watts will ad- 
dress the Threshermen and Farmer's 
Protective Association tomorrow night 
The President will speak on the Stale 
University plan. 

E. K. Hibshman is secretary of the 
show committee and will be one of the 
busiest men there. Those listed for ad- 
dresses at the many agricultural asso- 
ciation meetings during the week in- 
clude Miss MacDonald, Miss New- 
comb and Miss Owens; Messrs. Wil- 
son, Vinson, Hodgkiss, Fletcher, Ni.ss- 
ley, Tomhave, Borland, Rea, Munroe, 
Knandel and Orton. 

The Girls' Quartet will assist in the 
entertainment at the alumni banqu t. 



What is News? — A newspaper man, 
talking to the County Agents last 
week, quoted Samuel Blythe in this 
fashion: "There is no news value in 
the fact that a dog bites a man. but 
if a man bites a dog — that's differ- 
ent!" Some weeks ago we learned that 
a fifteen-year-old Freshman entered 
Penn State with but two years of high 
school training. There was news in 
the morsel, and investigation by the 
Publicity Department unearthed the 
fact that the truant officer in the 
boy's home town had pursued him to 
college! Result: — A lpage]_pjlfi. "story" 
in the home town (Philadelphia) 
papers, and circulation from coast to 
■coast of the photograph. Moral: — The 
College has no statistical bureau, so 
pass us your tips! 

o — - — ■ — 

Trustees Meet Toilay — The execu- 
tive committee of the College Board of 
Trustees meets this morning in Har- 
risburg, The full board assembles in 
the afternoon. Mr. Klauder, the col- 
lege architect, will explain the plans 
he has drawn for the future develop- 
ment of the campus. 

o 

There is an interesting exhibit of 
art for the home, sent out by the 
American Federation of Art, to be seen 
now in the Art Museum in Old Main. 
It will be there until about February 1. 



BR. SPARKS TO TAKE 

EXTENDED SPEAKING TOUR 

Dr. Sparks will spend the second 
semester in visiting universities and 
colleges in the interest of increased 
attention to American scholarship, 
under the auspices of the honorary 
society of Phi Kappa Phi, of which he 
is Regent General. He will speak at 
about sixty institutions from Massa- 
chusetts to California, and will return 
in time to teach in the Summer Ses- 
sion. 



Mid- Year Convocation — This year an 
effort is being made to give more dig- 
nity and importance to the mid-year 
Commencement Exercises. On Sunday, 
January 29, President Thomas will de- 
liver a Baccalaureate address to the 
graduating class. At the Commence- 
ment exercises at 7:30 on Tuesday 
evening, January 31, administrative of- 
ficers and members of the teaching- 
staff will occupy seats on the stage. 
Those who can appear in academic cos- 
tume are asked to do so. Dr. William 
D. Lewis, Deputy State Superintend- 
ent of Public Instruction, will deliver 
a Commencement address on "The Call 
for Educated Leaders." 



Scholarship ..Ideals — All honorary 
scholarship societies have been invit- 
ed by Phi Kappa Phi to meet at the 
U/niversity Club next Monday evening 
in the interest of higher scholarship. 
President Thomas and Dr. Sparks will 
discuss "The Scholarship Ideals at 
Penn State." The establishment of a 
"Scholarship Day" will be considered. 
The quartet and players will entertain, 
and a luncheon will be served. All 
members of honorary societies are in- 
vited. Those intending to be present 
should notify Professors Willard or 
Fletcher. 

o 

There will be no Tuesday evening 
Liberal Arts lecture until February 7, 
when Dr. J. E. Camp will talk on "Psy- 
chology and Occultism." 



Resident Thomas will be the Chapel 
speaker next Sunday morning when he 
will deliver the Baccalaureate to the 
Seniors to be graduated. There will 
be no evening service. 



The serving of School (Lunch in the 
Woman's Building will be discontinued 
for several weeks owing to examina- 
tions. It is planned to reopen ahout 
February 15. 



There will be a basketball game 
Saturday evening. Bucknell is the 
attraction. 



,1 I 



n i 
I 

-.; ; 

■ 1 

II 

I- 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
D. M. Cresswell, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME I 



State College, Pa., January 31, 1922 



NUMBER 15 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

Registrar's Office Hours — During Feb- 
ruary, until all grades have been re- 
corded and grade reports made out, 
the Registrar's Office will be open daily 
only from 11 to 12 and from 4 to 5. 

Faculty Processional — The faculty will 
assemble at 7:10 tonight in the Foyer 
of the Auditorium for the academic 
processional and will be expected to 
occupy seats on the platform. Acad- 
emic costume is desirable if convenient. 



-o- 

Students Withdraw — During the past 
week the following students have with- 
drawn from college: 
Sophomore — Carl Raymond Madera. 
Freshmen — William Edward Bumgard- 
ner; Bruce ILaFayete Campbell; Harry 
Gait Greenawalt; William Benjamin 
Hawthorne; Alphonse F. C. Kenowski; 
Kenneth William Lent; Clifton L. Ma- 
gee; Louis Winfield Millis, Jr.; 
George Sebert Mogle; Harden William 
Myers; Fredrik Gustave Ulberg; and 
Boris Demetrius Vishanoff. 
First Year Two- Year Agricultural Class 
— Daniel Gorman Glenn and Roger 
Grant Smith. 

Special Meeting- of the General Fac- 
ulty — 'Members of the teaching staff 
are asked to bear in mind the special 
meeting that has been called toy Pres- 
ident Thomas for tomorrow evening at 
7:30 in the Old Chapel when considera- 
tion will be given to the question of 
linking up the work of the public 
high schools of the State with the work 
of the college. Dr. William D. Lewis, 
Deputy State Superintendent of Pub- 
lic Instruction in charge of secondary 
education, will be the chief speaker at 
the meeting and he will outline the 
aims, the problems and the proposed 
curriculum for the public high schools 
of Pennsylvania. All members of the 
teaching staff are asked to attend. 



Engineering' Lecture— The engineering 
lecture on Friday at 4:30 in room 200, 
Engineering D, will he given by Roy 
V. Wright, managing editor of the 
Railway Age, whose subject will be 
"How to make the best use of Engi- 
neering Periodicals". He will also 
speak to the Motive Power Club that 
evening. 



University Club Concert— Special Enter- 
tainment is provided for the regular 
Club Night, Saturday, Feb 4. The 
musical program will include selections 
by the Musical Club Symphony Orches- 
tra, vocal solo by Mrs. J. F. Holben, 
violin solo by B. Witkoff and a piano 
solo by L. S. Rhodes. 



MID-YEAR CONVOCATION 

TAKES PLACE TONIGHT 

The annual mid-year Commencement 
Exercises will be held in the Auditor- 
ium at seven-thirty tonight when a 
class of 67 men and women will re- 
ceive diplomas. In order to add more 
dignity and importance to the mid- 
year exercises, the administrative of- 
ficers and members of the teaching 
staff will occupy seats on the stage; 
and those who can appear in academic 
costume are asked to do so. 

Dr. William Draper Lewis, Deputy 
State Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion, will deliver the Commencement 
address, his subject being "The Call 
for Educated Leaders". In addition 
to the diplomas, honorary military cer- 
tificates will be awarded to the mem- 
bers of the graduating class who were 
in military service. Announcement of 
I 'hi Kappa Phi elections will also be 
made at the Commencement exercises. 

Seven advanced degrees will be con- 
ferred at the exercises tonight. Those 
who are candidates for advanced de- ■ 
grees are: Master of Arts; Willis 
Knapp Jones and Joseph Alexander 
McCurdy, both instructors in Spanish. 
Master of Science; Russell David Cas- 
selberry and Preston Alexander Frost, 
instructors in Zoology, Donald Camer- 
on Cochrane, associate in Animal Nu- 
trition, and Paul Riley Smith, assistant 
in plant pathology extension. Mech- 
anical Engineer; Herbert Clinton Reese, 
of Washington, D. C, who is a mem- 
ber of the class of 1918 at Penn State. 

Liberal Arts Lecture — The regular Lib- 
eral Arts lecture series will be resumed 
tonight when Dr. J. E. DeCamp will 
talk on "Psychology and Occultism". 
o 

Chapel Speaker — The Chapel Speaker 
for next Sunday will be Rev. J. Lane 
Miller, of the Franklin Street Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, Johnstown, in 
place of Bishop McConnell, who was 
originally scheduled to speak at that 
time. 



Dean R. L. Saekett was in Harris- 
burg last week conferring with Com- 
missioner Connelly and Secretary F. 
J. Hartman of the Department of La- 
bor and Industry, relative to the col- 
lege undertaking the testing of certain 
safety devices and protective appara- 
tus. 



During the past week W. K. Jones, 
department of Romance Languages, 
gave six lectures in and around Pitts- 
burg an South America. Half of them 
were illustrated. 



TRUSTEES APPROVE PLANS 

FOR LARGER PENN STATE 

The college Board of Trustees held 
its annual meeting in Harrisburg last 
Tuesday and after viewing the archi- 
tect's plans for the development of 
Penn State to an institution accomo- 
dating a student body of 10,000, provis- 
ionally accepted them and referred 
them to a special committee for fur- 
ther consideration. Plans for the first 
units of the program, consisting of a 
dormitory for men and a beef cattle 
barn for the college farms were gone 
over and it is possible that ground 
may be broken in the Spring. 

The Trustees gave their sanction to 
the recommendations of the College 
Senate, changing the name of Land- 
scape Gardening to "Landscape Archi- 
tecture", and created a new engineer- 
ing course in "Architecture". Judge H. 
Walton Mitchell was re-elected presi- 
dent of the Board and the executive 
committee of Messrs. Vance C. Mc- 
Cormick; E. S. Bayard; M. L. Lowery; 
J. L. Orvis; E. R. Pettebone; J. F. 
Shields and Judge Mitchell, was also 
re-elected. 



Agricultural Exhibit This Week — The 

United States Department of Agricul- 
ture yesterday opened a special agri- 
cultural exhibit of an educational na- 
ture in the third floor of the Hort 
building. It is the same exhibit that 
has been shown by the government at 
state and national fairs. It includes 
the actual demonstration of grain 
grades; an exhibit of standard market 
containers; tentative wool standards; 
meat grades and cuts, potato storage 
methods, model apple house and re- 
frigerator car. The display is shown 
by Mr. B. L. Perkins, who has brought 
it from Rutgers. It goes to Cornell 
next week. 



Elected to office — Last week was a 
busy one for members of the agricul- 
tural faculty most of whom were in 
Harrisburg for the Farm Products 
Show. A number of State College men 
were elected to various offices during 
the many meetings that were held, 
but only a partial list is available. 

Dr. S. W. -Fletcher was elected presi- 
dent of the State Horticultural Asso- 
ciation ; Dr. H. H. Havner, secretary 
of the Breeders and Dairymen; W. B. 
Connell, secretary-treasur of the Penn- 
sylvania Sheep Breeders; Donald M. 
Gray, vice-president, and H. C. Knan- 
del, secretary, of the State Poultry As- 
sociation} and W. B. Nissley, secretary, 
of the State Vegetable Growers Asso- 
ciation. 

The first boxing meet of the season 
will be held in the Armory next Sat- 
urday evening with Springfield Col- 
lege as an opponent. 



- ft ~ 



• . " 



Published every Tuesday 
luring the college year as a 
neans of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
terns of interest to the facul- 

y. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must ue as 
brief as possible, and reach 
D. M. Cresswell, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME I 



State College, Pa., February 7, 1922 



NUMBER 16 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

[Reexaminations. — The Faculty action 
ibolishing' reexaminations has been re- 
scinded. Students who received a "D" 
rade in first semester subjects will 
therefore be entitled to a reexamina- 
tion. The first reexaminations will be 
held on Saturday afternoon, March 11. 
and the others on succeeding Saturday 
afternoons. A complete schedule of 
reexaminations will be posted as soon 
as it can be prepared. 

o 

Income Tax Returns — For the infor- 
mation of the more recent members of 
the faculty the Treasurer of the Col- 
lege states that the Commissioner of 
Internal Revenue at Washington has 
ruled that the compensation paid the 
'employees of The Pennsylvania State 
.College is derived from State funds and 
is, therefore, exempt from income tax 
]and no return of the same need be 
made to the Internal Revenue Depart- 
ment. 

o— 

L. A. Faculty — The regular meeting 
of the Faculty of the School of the 
Liberal Arts will be held on Monday, 
February 13th, at 4:30 p. m., in room 
25, L. A. — L. V. T. Simmons, Secretary. 
o 

Agricultural Faculty — There will be 
a meeting of the faculty of the School 
of Agriculture and Experiment Station 
in Room 103, Agricultural Building, at 
4:30 p. m., Tuesday, February 7. 
o 

Students Withdraw — During the past 
week the following students have left 
college: 

Senior, George William Rummel. 

Junior, Charles DeWitt Rose. 

Sophomores, Samuel Russell Ash, 
Earl Edison Keirsted, Calvin R. Myers, 
Russell Edward Peters, Lewis Roy 
Roberts, George Stanley Struble. 

Freshmen, Robert Lloyd Arthur, 
Harvey Martin Black, Maurice Bernard 
Ferderber, Calvin D. Mitchell. Martin 
Henry Oermann, Elah Sedgwick Orton, 
John Livingstone Richardson, Kyle Ir- 
win Robinson, James Russell Rose, 
James Dixon Ward and Benton Harold 
Whipple. 



FINAL EXAMINATIONS 

At 5:30 P. M. Monday, May 29, 1922, 
all lectures, recitations and practicum 
for Seniors will close. 

At noon, Thursday, June 1, 1922, all 
other lectures, recitations and practi- 
cum for the second semester will close. 

From May 30 to June 3, 1922, final 
examinations for Seniors will be held. 

From June 1, noon, to June 9, noon, 
1922, final examinations for all stu- 
dents but Seniors will be held. 

W. S. Hoffman, Assistant Registrar. 



EDUCATIONAL PUBLICITY 

LECTURE NEXT WEEK 

Believing, that faculty members would 
be able to receive great personal benefit 
from a talk on the value of publicity in 
education, arrangements have been 
made by the Publicity Department of 
the college for a talk on ''Educational 
Publicity" by Professor W. P. Kirkwood, 
head of the publicity department and 
editor of publications at the Univer- 
sity of Minnesota, in the Old Chapel 
on Wednesday evening, February 15. 
at 7 o'clock. Professor Kirkwood is 
also a teacher of journalism and has a 
national reputation as a publicity man 
and author. He is making a tour of 
eastern colleges as a part of a college- 
publicity research project, and Penn 
State is fortunate to secure him for a 
talk on this important subject, the val- 
ue of which is not always fully realized 
by educators. 



Examination has been made of the 
admission records in the case of Miss 
Fannie Ruley, a graduate »of the Wil- 
liam Penn High School for Girls, re- 
ferred tfi by Doctor William D. Lewis 
at the conference on February 1st. The 
rill ranee certificate filled out by Doc- 
tor Lewis as Principal of the William 
Penn High School states over his sig- 
nature that while Miss Ruley did not 
study Algebra and Plane Geometry in 
his school, she had taken both subjects 
in the West Philadelphia High School, 
securing a grade of "B" in each. On the 
strength of this statement, she receiv- 
ed entrance credit by certificate for 
I wo units of Mathematics. 



U. Club Card Party— There will be a 
formal "500" and bridge party at the 
University Club for club members and 
their partners on Friday, Feb. 10, at S 
o'clock. Reservations, indicating in- 
tention to play "500" or bridge, should 
lie in the hands of the club steward by 
the 8th. Charges will be fifty cents 
per plate. 



Players' Anniversary Offering — The 

Penn State Players will produce "The 
Witching Hour," a melodrama by Aug- 
ustus Thomas, in the Auditorium next 
Friday and Saturday evenings. It is 
their second anniversary performance, 
and is intended to be the banner offer- 
ing of the season. Souvenir programs 
have been designed for the occasion. 
Prices for lower floor, 75 cents; bal- 
cony, 50 cents. 



The Faculty Language Club will meet 
in tne Foyer of the Auditorium, Wed- 
J nesday, February 8, at 7 p. m. Profes- 
sor Pattee will speak on O. Henry. 



TO TELL OF FORMER 

PENN STATE PRESIDENTS 

Professor J. Chauncey Shortlidge, 
head of the Maplewood Institute for 
Young Men and Boys, and son of Jos- 
eph Shortlidge, the sixth president of 
Penn State, will deliver an address on 
the life and work of his father and of 
Dr. Evan Pugh, the first Penn State 
president, in the Old Chapel on next 
Thursday evening, Feb. 9th, at 7 o'clock. V' 
At that time he will present to the col- 
lege an enlarged portrait of his father. 
He is an entertaining speaker and a 
staunch supporter of the university 
idea for Penn State. Joseph Shortlidge 
was elected president May 27, 1880, and 
resigned April 8th, 1881, returning to 
his former work as principal of Maple- 
wood Institute. 

o 

Special Lecture Series — A series of 
ten lectures on the fundamental prin- 
ciples of good organization and man- 
agement that will be of interest to all 
college people, will be given in the 
Old Chapel beginning at 10:30 a. m. 
next Monday, Feb. 13, continuing each 
day at 10:30 a. m. and 4:30 p. m., un- 
lil Friday evening the 17th. The lec- 
turer will be .1. P. Jordan, a consulting 
Industrial Engineer of New York City. 
He lectures at New York University 
and in the Graduate School of Busi- 
ness Administration at Harvard Uni- 
versity. 

Liberal Arts Lecture — Due to an er- 
ror, the Liberal Arts lecture on "Psy- 
chology and Occultism" by Dr. J. E. 
DeCamp was announced in last week's 
Bulletin for last Tuesday night. This 
lecture will be given tonight (Feb. 7) 
in the Old Chapel at 7 o'clock. 

NEWS BRIEFS 

The College Band will give a con- 
cert in the Auditorium next Sunday aft- 
ernoon, Feb. 12, at 3:30. 

There will be a 'varsity basketball 
game with Bethany College next Sat- 
urday evening. 

The Chapel speaker next Sunday will / 
be Hon. C. G. Jordan, of Volant, mem- * 
ber of the State House of Representa- 
tives. 

Professor and Mrs. H. H. Arnold are 
celebrating the arrival on January 23rd 
of David Anderson Arnold, weight 
eight and one-half pounds. 

D. L. Harmon, instructor in the 
Physics Department, and Miss Mary E. 
Malloy, chief clerk in the office of the 
purchasing agent, were married Janu- 
ary 23 at High Mass in Our, Lady of 
Victory Chapel in the borough by Fa- 
ther O'Hanlon. Following a wedding 
trip of a week to the western part of 
the state they returned to reside at 600 
Allen street. 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETI 



Contributions must ue as 
brief as possible, and reach 
D. M. Cresswell, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME I 



State College, Pa., February 14, 1922 



NUMBER 17 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

Senate Meeting' — The regular Febru- 
ary meeting of the College Senate will 
be held next Thursday evening, Febru- 
ary 16, at 7:30 in the Foyer of the Aud- 
itorium. 



Schedule Copies — Each member of 
the teaching staff will please send tu 
Assistant Registrar Hoffman, before 
February 25, a copy of his actual sche- 
ule, indicating the room (number and 
building; in which he is located at any 
given time. 



Natural Science Faculty — There will 
be a meeting of the School of Natural 
Science faculty this afternoon, Tues- 
day, Feb. 14, at 4:30 o'clock, in the 
Phj sics lecture room. 



Permits for Re -examination — The 

Council of Administration has decided 
that all instructors shall except the of- 
ficial notice of a failure with a "D" 
grade, sent to the student by the Reg- 
istrar, as a sufficient permit for a re- 
examination. To save time and expense, 
the Registrar will issue a permit only 
to those students who have lost or mis- 
laid their official notice of a "D" grade. 
—A. H. ESPENSHADE, Registrar. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAWN 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 

Juniors — Lawrence Marvin Forn- 
crook. 

Sophomores— Gerald A. Farabaugh, 
Evan Paul Fowler, George Albert 
Rack, Charles Lewis Smith and Vin- 
cent Tempone. 

Freshmen — Andrew Edward Brin- 
ninger, James Maurice Cameron, Ralph 
Sharpnack Covert, Thomas J. Cullen, 
John William Edwards, Walter Feely, 
George Edward Felton, Lea Clark 
Gressly, Samuel David Kopelman, Earl 
Edwin Lesher, Thomas Henry Lever- 
ing, Samuel Louis Manincon, Nelson 
Miles Phillips, Oscar K. Kriegel, Le- 
Roy Galbraith, Harold L. Sigworth. 
Joseph Roland Simmons, Dudley Clar- 
ence Snyder, Wilbert Boon Wallace, 
Percival Sherman White, Thomas Wil- 
liams and John Byers Yoder. 

A. H. ESPENSHADE, Registrar. 



"What is Good Architecture?" is the 
subject of the Liberal Arts lecture to- 
night at 7 o'clock in the Old Chapel, to 
be illustrated, and given by Professor 
A. L. Kocher, head of the Department 
of Architecture. 



EDUCATIONAL NEWS 

LECTURE WED. NIGHT 

The average college faculty 
member may be rubbing elbows 
with a good news item every day, 
but totally unaware of the fact 
that by passing it along he will 
benefit many others. The Pub- 
licity Department of the college 
desires to inaugurate an educa- 
tional publicity campaign, ex- 
tending over an indefinite per- 
iod of time, the aim being to 
point out methods for making 
the best use of the department in 
the matter of desirable public- 
ity. 

To start the ball rolling, Pro- 
fessor W. P. Kirkwood, editor 
and publicity director at the 
University of Minnesota, has 
been secured to talk on "Educa- 
tional Publicity" before a faculty 
audience on Wednesday evening 
(tomorrow), at 7 o'clock in Old 
Chapel. Every faculty and ad- 
ministrative staff member, for 
college as well as personal bene- 
fit, should take advantage of this 
opportunity to hear the answer 
to "What is news and how can it 
be distributed?" 



HELP A GOOD CAUSE 

The Chamber of Commerce Rat Ex- 
termination campaign to be staged on 
the campus and in the town next week 
is commendable and deserving of the 
support of all faculty members called 
upon to cooperate. It is a matter to 
be taken seriously, as a successful 
campaign of this sort can, under exist- 
ing circumstances, do much good for 
the community. 

JOHN M. THOMAS. 



President Thomas to Speak — Presi- 
dent Thomas will speak to the Phila- 
delphia Alumni tonight if he has suf- 
ficiently recovered from his recent ill- 
ness,, but 'he has been forced to break 
an engagement to speak at Wilkes- 
Barre tomorrow night at a combined 
meeting of the Luzerne County Farm 
Bureau, the Chamber of Commerce, and 
the Alumni. On Thursday night, he 
will speak at the Academy of Music in 
Philadelphia upon the occasion of 
Founders' Day of Temple University, 
leaving immediately after the exercises 
for Dc Land, Florida, for a stay of 
about two weeks. 



The Chapel speaker next Sunday will 
be the Rev. Dr. Floyd W. Tomkins, of 
the Church of the Holy Trinity, Phila- 
delphia. 



ANNOUNCE LIST FOR 

PROBATION SECTION 

Last September seventeen students 
who desired to change courses were ad- 
mitted to the probation section. Twelve 
of these had been dropped from the 
College previously for poor scholarship. 
Of these seventeen, ten passed every- 
thing. Six received one failure each, 
and the other one received two. Six- 
teen have been transferred to regular 
courses. The following transfers from 
the Probation Section to regular courses 
have been made : 

To Ag. F. G. Hoenstine. 

To Arch. Eng. Joseph F. Kuntz. 

To Pre-Med. Harry A. Wrigley. 

To Pre-Legal, Howard A. Sayford 
and Robert T. Cook. 

To Ed. and Psy. D. W. Rettew. 

To Commerce and Finance: D. K. P. 
Bail-. Ralph E. Cornish, Henry S. Ke- 
nan. William H. Fortna, Lawrence W. 
Harper, Thomas K. lLaws, Robert S. 
Notestine, Fred F. O'Donnell, G. T. 
Peifer. 

H. M. Davis has been held in the 
section for one more semester. 

The following students have been 
admitted to the section for the second 
semester: 

In charge of the Dean of Men: 

Albertson, F. T. 

Bachike, A. 

Corter, S. Gordon. 

Corrigan, Martin A. 

Erb, John E. 

Davis, Herbert M. 

Graeff, G. A. 

Hollis, Arthur. 

Homan, J. M. 

Ingham, D. F. 

Jacobs, W. H. 

Jones, Z. Marshall. 

Loffi, E. T. 

McClune, F. C. 

Neff, Duane. 

Vannucci, J. W. 

Waldo, C. E. 

In charge of the Dean of Women : 

Foster, Susan L. 

Kessinger, Caroline B. 

Shultz, Neva M. 

Scholarship reports for these stu- 
dents should be sent to the dean in 
charge. 

o 

Research Staff — There will be a meet- 
ing of the Research Staff of the School of 
Agriculture and Experiment Station in 
Room 103, Agricultural Building at 
4:30 p. m., Tuesday, February 14. All 
members of the school faculty engaged 
in research, teaching or extension work 
are invited to attend. The purpose of 
the meeting is to consider the applica- 
tion of the law of probable error in 
our research work.— R. L. WATTS, 
Dean and Director. 



(TURN OVER) 



Re-Examination Schedule 



Following is the schedule of re-ex- 
aminations for students receiving a 
"D" grade in coureses other than practi- 
cum, for first semester work: 

Saturday, 1:30 P. M. March 11 

Chem. (all courses) ..Amp., C. A. 

Chem. Ag. (all courses) 100 Hort. 

Com. 3. 15 -2S L. A. 

D. H. (all courses) 259 Dairy 

Ed. 11 19 L- A. 

Hurl, (all courses) 206 Ag. 

Mng. 51, 71 104 ling. A 

III Eng. 30, 3-1 - 201 Eng. C 

Hyd. (all courses) 201 Ens'. A 

Str (all courses) 200 Eng. D 

Tuesday. 1:30 P. M, March 14 

Mehs. 2, 7 21)0 Ens D 

Psy. (all courses) 25 L. A. 

Thursday. 1:30 P. M.. March 16 

Physics (all courses) 200 Eng. D 

Saturday, 8:30 A. M.. March is 

Botany (all courses) 2 B<>t. 

Saturday, 1:30 P. M., March is 

Agio, (all courses) 200 Hort. 

Com. 25 25 L. A. 

Dom. Sci. 31 W. B 

Econ. 1, 14 28 L. A. 

E. E. 7, S 200 Eng. D 

French (all courses) Amp. 

Crv. (all courses) 1G L. A. 

Ht. Eng. 35 201 Eng. (' 

Hyg. 1 314, 315 Main 

Met. (except 50. 53) 104 Mng. A 

P. II. (all courses) 202 Hort. 

R. R. 1, 14 201 Eng A. 

Sp. (all courses) Amp. 

Tuesday, 1:30 P. M.. March 21 

lit. Eng. 17 200 Eng. D 

Met. 59 201 Mng. B 

Thursday, 1:30 P. M.. March 23 

ITt. Eng. 2G 200 Eng. D 

Saturday, 1:30 P. M„ March 25 

Bact. 2 239 Dairy 

Dom. Art 22 W. B. 

Ech. E. 2 200 Eng. E 

Econ. 21, 35 28 L. A. 

Engl, (all courses) 100. 200 Hort. 

ill. Eng. 50 201 Eng. C 

Latin 11 313 Main 

M. Des. (all courses) 200 Eng. D 

Met. 53 104 Mng. A 

Pol. Soi. 1 25 L. A. 

Rur. Econ. 201 202 Hort. 

Sur. 15, 42 201 Eng. A 

Zool, (all courses) 4 McA. II. 

Thursday. 1:30 P. M„ March 30 
History (all courses) 200 Eng. D 



Saturday. 1:30 P. M„ April 1 

A. H. (all courses) 20G Ag. 

Com. 20, 30 100 Hort. 

E. E. 1. 3 200 Eng. D 

Geol. 31. 41 104 Mng. A 

Ht. Eng. 13 201 Eng. C 

Math, (all courses) 25, 2S L. A. 

Alin. (all courses) 200 Mng. A 

1. E. 70G. Sll 210 Eng. C 

U. M. E. 1 201 Eng. A 

W. S. HOFFMAN, Asst. Registrar. 

STUDENTS FROM 

OTHER COLLEGES 

Seventy-seven new students entered 
The Pennsylvania State College this 
fall with more or less academic credit 
for advanced standing from forty dif- 
ferent colleges and universities, as fol- 
lows : 

From the Carnegie Institute of Tech- 
nology, 11; from the University of 
Pittsburgh, S; from the University of 
Pennsylvania, 6; from Washington and 
Jefferson College, 5; from Allegheny, 
4; from the Cumberland Valley State 
Normal School, the University of Dela- 
ware, Drexel Institute, Franklin and 
Marshall College, Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Leland Stanford University, Penn- 
sylvania College (Gettysburg), ana the 
Philadelphia Normal School, 2 each; 
from the Bloomsburg State Normal 
School, Brown University, Bucknell 
University, Cornell University, David- 
son College. Geneva College, Grove 
City College, Hood College, Howard 
University, University of Illinois, Juni- 
ata ollege, Lafayette College, Lehigh 
University, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, Millersville State Normal 
School, Moravian College, Otterbein 
College, Furdue University, Sweet 
Briar College, Syracuse University, 
Yanderbilt University, Villanova Col- 
legia Wells College, West Chester 
State Normal School, Westminster Col- 
lege, West Virginia University, Y. M. 
C. A. College a Springfield, Mass., one 
each. 

These 77 students who entered with 
(.advanced standing were classified as 
follows: 

Seniors, 1; Juniors, 7; Sophomores, 
55; Freshmen, 14. 

Of these 77 students, 5S entered from 
Pennsylvania institutions and 19 from 
colleges and universities outside the 
state. In the latter group, colleges 
and universities from every section of 
the country are represented — New Eng- 
land, the South, the Middle-West, and 
the Far- West. 

The above tabulation shows that 
there has been a marked increase over 
last fall in the number of students 
from other colleges and universities 
who have sought and secured admis- 
sion to this College with advanced 
standing; in fact, this increase amounts 



to 54 per cent. In other wards, The 
Pennsylvania State College has admitt- 
ed more students this fall with advanc- 
ed standing from other institutions of 
collegiate grade than are contained in 
the entire Sophomore Class of such in- 
stitutions as Lebanon Valley College, 
Muhlenburg College, or Franklin and 
Marshall College. 



77 Change Courses — For the informa- 

Uno of the Faculty, the Registrar re- 
ports that seventy-seven students have 
changed their course from one school 
to another at the beginning of the sec- 
ond semester. 

The following tabulation, based upon 
petitions presented to the Registrar, 
indicates each scihoool's gain or loss 
in number: 

From Agriculture, 13; 
ture 13; gain, 0. 

From Engineering, 29; 
ing, 9; loss, 20. 

From Liberal Arts, 4 
Aits, 43; gain, 39. 

From Mines. 3; to Mines, 2; loss, 1 

From Natural Science, .10; to Natu- 
ral Science. 8; loss, 2. 

From Probation Section, 14; to Pro- 
bation Section, 2; loss, 12. 



to Agricul- 
to Engineer- 
to Liiberal 



o 



I elp! — More contributions are asked I 

for the Faculty Bulletin. Variety and 
brevity in large amounts make an in- 
teresting weekly page. Tell us when 
you go away, or have an attraction II 
coming here. We must depend almost 
entirely upon "contribs" for the make- || 
up and hate to use "filler" when we 
could have live news items. Three p. 
m. Friday is the first call for the print- 
er, and 11 a. m. Saturday is the last 
call. Early Monday morning is the 
"extreme emergency" call. 

o 

Kent ing Rooms — Will members of the 
Faculty wishing to rent rooms to Sum- 
mer Session students kindly notify the j 
Dean of Women by February 20th? 
Many requests for rooms have already 
been received. A directory of rooming 
houses is being prepared and will be 
mailed soon to all registrants. 
o — 

The exhibition of oil paintings of the 
Ihe School of the Academy of Fine! 
Arts, will be on display in the Art 
Museum, Old Main, today and tomor- 
row. 

o 

M. T. Phillips, of Pomeroy, Pa., will 
give a lecture in 259 Dairy Building on 
Thursday evening, the 16th, at 7 
o'clock. He is a prominent Guersney 



breeder and those interested in dairy 
improvement are invited to attend. 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
I nouncements and presenting 
ii items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
D. M. Cresswell, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME I 



State College, Pa., February 21, 1922 



NUMBER 18 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

Assistant Registrar's Hours — Until 
further notice my office hours will be 
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and 
Saturday, 9 to 11 a. m., and on Monday, 
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, 
from 2:30 to 4:00 p. m. It will foe use- 
less to 'phone or call at hours other 
than these. — W. S. Hoffman, Assistant 
Registrar. 



Students Withdraw — During the past 
week the following students have with- 
drawn from College: 

Seniors — Andrew Kimmel Wilson. 

Juniors — Paul Budd Antrim, John 
Chester Foore, Raymond King Foust, 
Karl Francis Mayers, James Vincent 
Williams. 

Sophomores — Elvin Benjamin Cos- 
tenbader, Gerald Amandus Farabaugh, 
Ernest Hanson, Harold Alexander Mc- 
Donald, Elliott Ellsworth McKean, Cal- 
vin R. Myers, Russell Edward Peter? 
Lewis Roy Roberts, Robert Noll Shef- 
fer, Edward Irving Sprague. 

Freshmen — Glen Emery Baily, Ver- 
ner Harold Barber, Harvey Martin 
Black, George Dewey Boyd, James Lau- 
rence Bunchanan, Gene Edward Bur- 
rows, Guy Lester Corman, Benjamin 
Franklin Faunce, Edward Watson Fell, 
Ernest Guerriero, Joseph Raymond 
Hull, Jay Ray Lilley, Alfred Lowry, 
HenryThomas McQuaide, Clifton Magee, 
Emry Walton Marks, Harry Arthur 
Meighen, Elah Sedgwick Orton, Walter 
Howard Parsons, Nelson Miles Phillips, 
Harry Adam Pickel, Jr., Charles Allen 
Pollock, Robert Don\a|ld Rosenberger, 
George Greaff Robinson, James Price 
Rupp, LeRoy Galbraith Searson, Harold 
L. Sigworth, Joseph Roland Simmons, 
Leslie Duganne Smith, George Seebick 
Steele, Michael William Uhrin, WSlbert 
[Boon Wallace, James Dixon Ward, Per- 
cival Sherman White, Miles E. Wilson, 

Special — Arthur John Woodbridge. 

The College Calendar approved by the 
j Senate at its last meeting includes the 
j following more important features: 

The coming Easter recess begins at 
1 5:20 p. m., Wednesday, April 12, and 
ends at 8 a. m., Thursday, April 20. Me- 
morial Day will be observed as a holi- 
day; all classes suspended. Summer 
(Session from June 27 to August 26. Col- 
lege opens September 11. Thanksgiving 
(Day will be a holiday, but there will be 
I no longer recess. Christmas vacation 
begins 5:20 p. m. Friday, December 15 
[and ends 8:00 a. m„ Wednesday, Jan- 
uary 3. Winter Farmers' Week will be 
December 18-22. 



The school lunch will be served on 
Mondays and Wednesdays in the Wom- 
en's Building at 12:15, beginning Feb- 
ruary 20. 



SENATE MAKES CHANGES IN 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

In order that any Pennsylvania boy 
or girl who has been graduated with a 
creditable record from a four-year high 
school may be eligible for admission to 
a considerable number of courses lead- 
ing to a degree from the College, the 
Se'iate has voted that .henceforth only 
one unit of entrance credit in science 
shall be prescribed for all courses but 
the Classical (for which no science is 
required), and that for entrance to the 
25 courses offered by the Schools of 
Agriculture, Engineering a.nd Mines, 
and the Department of Home Econom- 
ics, the fixed requirement of two units 
of foreign language be dropped. 

For admission to these courses pre- 
paratory credit in language and science 
may still be offered as "elective" units. 
Fur the present no change has been 
made in the fixed requirements of the 
two units of foreign language for en- 
trance to courses in the Schools of Lib- 
eral Arts and Natural Science. The 
total of fifteen units required for ad- 
mission has not been changed. 

The reduction in the number of pre- 
scribed units and the corresponding in- 
crease in free elective units, has been 
made in the interests of applicants who 
have completed an industrial, or voca- 
tional, or commercial course in the high 
school, as well as for the purpose of 
adjusting our entrance requirements to 
the new high school curriculum of the 
State Department of Public Instruction. 

The Senate also voted that solid 
geometry should no longer be pre- 
scribed for admision to the Pre-Mcdi- 
cal course. 



-o- 



NEWS BRIEFS 

Announcement has been made of the 
appointment of Dr. Arthur S. Hurrell, 
now at the University of Pittsburgh, as 
Assistant Dean of the /Summer Session 
and of Educational Extension. An 
article on Dr. Hurrell Will be published 
in next week's Bulletin. 

The Liberal Arts Tuesday evening 
entertainment course tonight will be a 
lecture on "Moliere" by Dr. I. L. Fos- 
ter. It will be followed by the Penn 
State Players in Moliere's "The Affect- 
ed Young Ladies." It will be held in 
the Auditorium instead of Old Chapel, 
at 7 o'clock. 

The Engineering lecture on Febru- 
ary 24th will be delivered by Magnus 
W. Alexander, Managing Editor of the 
National Industrial Conference Board, 
New York. This lecture will probably 
be in the Old Chapel because of its gen- 
eral interest. Mr. Alexander spent some 
months in Europe studying Industrial 
conditions, particularly in Germany. He 
will speak on "Industrial Conditions in 
Europe and America." 



DOCTOR WILLIAM FREAR 

The College Senate, on February 10. 
adopted the following memorial resolu- 
tion: 

During a single semester, death has 
removed from our college body the two 
senior members of the teaching force, 
both of them undiminished in power, 
at the full tide of manifold activities in 
the college and in the wider world of 
scholarship and of affairs. Both died 
after brief illness, dropping the full vol- 
ume of their work while literally in the 
harness, as doubtless they might have 
prayed to do. 

On the morning of January 7, died 
Dr. William Frear, for years the oldest 
of the faculty in point of service, the 
last link between the old college of the 
period of foundation and the new uni- 
versity of the present area. His stu- 
dent life had been passed at Bucknell 
and at Illinois Wesleyan University 
from the latter of which he received the 
degree of Ph. D. in 1883. Two years 
later, in 1885, he came to The Pennsyl- 
vania State College as professor of ag- 
ricultural chemistry, and the rest of his 
life, with constantly added duties and 
responsibilities, he gave to this college. 

We, his colleagues of the teaching 
force, view today with solemn pride his 
life and his achievements among us; his 
patient and fruitful work in the field 
of research; his devotion to the single 
aim of enriching the great profession to 
whose service he had dictated his life; 
his untiring interest in the success of 
the college and the town; and above 
all the sterling quality of his manhood, 
whicn stood ever as a force in the di- 
rection of better things. We shall miss 
his counsel as we face our problems as 
a college; the State will miss his lead- 
ership in many fields in which he was 
a pioneer; and all of us will miss his 
kindly spirit and his fatherly wisdom 
as neighbor and colleague and dear 
friend. He is now forever of the col- 
lege, a tradition of the days of struggle, 
of doubt and fear and soul-trying toil, 
of ultimate triumph and of vindication. 
Happy the college that has built into 
its foundations such sturdy men and 
true, men like him whom today we 
mourn, and yet lift our hearts in re- 
joicing even as we mourn. 



-o- 



Dr. Herbert Adams Gibobns, histor- 
ian, author and journalist, will speak 
at 8 o'clock Thursday night in the 
Auditorium under the auspices of Phi 
Kappa Phi. He served as a corres- 
pondent at the Versailles and Washing- 
ton conferences, and is expected to give 
same interesting information on these 
gatherings. 



The Next Music Department — Y. M. C. 

A. entertainment course will be given 
in the Auditorium on next Saturday 
evening. The "Oceanic Ladies Quin- 
tet" will be the attraction. 



r 



313 M. : " 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
no ncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 



ine rei 



ACULT 



Lia State College 

o 

RuL, 



Contributions must ue aa 
brief as possible, and reach 
D. M. i 11, Bulletin Edi- 

tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME I 



State College, Pa., February 2 8, 1922 



NIB 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

Income Tax — The following commun- 
ication has been received from the of- 
fice of the collector of the Internal 
Revenue Service, at Scranton, Pa., rel- 
ative to the payment of income tax by 
faculty members: 

"If your combined gross income (in- 
come of husband, wife and dependent 
minor children) equalled or exceeded 
$5000, or if your combined net income 
amounted to or exceeded $2000, you 
must report same on a joint return, or 
on separate returns of husband and 
wife. 

"If single and the net income includ- 
ing that of dependent minors, if any, 
equalled or exceeded $1000, or if the 
gross income equalled or exceeded $5000, 
a return must be filed. 

"If you have income as stated above 
in addition to that received from the 
State College, you would have to file a 
return, otherwise not." 



North American Editorial — The Phil- 
adelphia North American has kindly 
supplied the college with a large num- 
ber of copies of its editorial on "A Free 
Bia University" in the form enclosed 
ftth .his issue of the Bulletin. A copy 
will be sent to each alumnus, and oth- 
erwise distributed where they will be 
m p ciated. Additional copies, if de- 
by faculty members, may be se- 
llired through the Publicity Dept. of- 
fice, 175 Old Main. 



Lents Withdraw — During the past 
gee! foil ■ dents have left 



mors— Edw 



M n t agu e 
.. „n^i jui'uaij otiyiur 

...a. — Robert Brown Atwell, Fred 
jrl 3i _w. t i', Ai.een Mossman Fell and 
e, iter Stephens Jackson. 

Sjid.oiiiores — Francis Hutchinson 

Garrahan, Henry Hurlow John, Taylor 
Johnson Lear, Jonathan Earl Ritten- 
house and Herman Dwight Stewart. 

Freshmen — Walter John Hafner, Ger- 
ald Emerson Hughes and LeRoy Or- 
ville Richards. 

Two Year Ag. — Paul Strusbaugh. 



Faculty members are urged by the 
Y. M. C. A., that when called upon to 
take charge of a Bible Discussion 
group, they give the matter serious con- 
sideration. Many fraternities now have 
these groups with faculty leaders. The 
"Y" is prepared to furnish a list of suit- 
able subjects, with questions designed 
to provoke thinking and direct the dis- 
cussion. 



lili. HUREELL A WELL 

KNOWN EBUCV 

The appointment of Dr. Arthur S. 
Hurrell as Assistant Dean of the Sum- 
mer Sess'.on and of Educational Exten- 
sion, will bring to Penn State a man 
who is in the foremost ranks of voca- 
tional education and vocational teacher 
training in the country. Located at 
the University of Pittsburgh since 191S, 
Dr. Hurrell is fully acquainted with the 
desires of Dean Chambers for teacher 
training methods, and together they 
should take Penn State's Summer Ses- 
sion and extension to a great degree of 
service. Dr. Hurrell will take up his 
duties at the opening of the Summer 
Session. He will specialize in voca- 
tional and home economies I 
training and industrial education, both 
here and in the state-wide field. 

The new Assistant Dean received his 
Bachelor's degree at Syracuse Univer- 
sity in 1904, and the degree of Doctor 
of Pedagogy at the same institution in 
1920. He was for ten years associated 
with the Technical high school in Buf- 
falo, acting as principal, 1909-1916. He 
was assistant superintendent of schools 
at Indianapolis, 1916-1918, and after 
; as an educational director in 

the ; ent to the University of 

Pittsburgh as Professor of Vocational 
Education and Director of "Vocational 
Teacher Training. 

He holds membership in the National 
and the Pennsylvania societies for vo- 
cational education; National Associa- 
tion of Corporation Training; is presi- 
dent of the department of vocational 
education and practical arts, and mem- 
ber of the executive council of the 
Perm's State Educational Association; 
is secretary of the Education Associa- 
tion of Western Penna.; member Phi 
Kappa Psi, Phi Delta Kappa and 
a Sigma Phi. 



Graduate Students — The college cata- 
logue for the current year will con- 
tain the names of 132 graduate stu- 
dents. According to their major sub- 
jects these are distributed as follows 
among the various schools of the col- 
lege: Agriculture, 44; Liberal Arts, 36; 
Engineering, 24; Natural Science, 20, 
and Mines, 8. 



Buy Your Garden Now — Student gar- 
dens operated by the Department of 
Horticulture will be sold as usual this 
spring, preference being given to mem- 
bers of the faculty. Gardens will be 
practically twice as large as last year, 
and the charge will be eight dollars 
($8.00). Applications may be made at 
the office of W. C. Petton, 103 Hort. 
Building, in person or in writing, and 
gardens will be assigned until the full 
number, 70, have been allotted. 



ca t : 



■ . i 

be i : i*3 this evening 

Chaj el at 7 o :loi !< will be 
Spirt of the V\ -■■' n ! tate Qniversi- 
by Dean War ock. 

T1-.0 « ay 

A. A. A. S e -The State C\ liege 

tr Hi 1 he A .- .Ti":ai Ass ) :iation 
for the Adv; : of Science will 

meet at the University Club at 7:30 
Thursday evening. Election of officers, 
adoption of constitution, and other bus- 
iness is on the program. All members 
and persons who have made applica- 
tion to membership, or who will have 
turned in such application by Thurs- 
day night, are requested to be present. 
Dean Watts will give "Illustrations 
from the Lives of Doctors Armsby and 
Frear." There will be an assessment of 
35 cents to cover refreshments. Notify 
Prof. E. J. Kunze not later than Tues- 
day, Feb. 28, if you expect to attend. 

Friday 
The - "or Friday, 

3rd, v/iil be on "Highway Re- 
search" by Professor W. K. Hatt, of 
rial Research Council, in Room 
200 Engineering D at 4:30. Dr. Hatt is 
Head of the School of Civil Engineer- 
ing of Purdue University. 

Saturday 

Wrestling. Indiana University, Arm- 
cry, afternoon. 

Basketball, Creighton University, Ar- 
mbry, evening. 

Sunday 

The Chapel speaker will be the Rev. 
Dr. James L. Barton, of Boston, secre- 
tary of the Foreign Department, Amer- 
ican Board of Commissioners for For- 
eign Missions. 



Dr. H. II. Havner, in charge of ani- 
mal husbandry extension in the state, 
will lecture on the sw.ne industry in 
Pennsylvania before a group of prae- 
tioners at the , eterinary School of the 
University of Pennsylvania on Wednes- 
day. 



Ohio State University Alumni in State 
College recently organized an Ohio 
State Alumni Club with Professor F. N. 
Fagan as president, and Dean Marga- 
ret A. Knight, secretary. 



-o- 



Dean Knight was in Chicago Febru- 
ary 22nd to the 20th to attend the An- 
nual Meeting of the Association of 
Deans of Women. 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETI 



Contributions must t>e as 
brief as possible, and reach 
D. M. Cresswell, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME I 



State College, Pa., March 7, 1922 



NUMBER 20 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

Senate to Meet Tuesday — In order 
to accommodate the speaking schedule 
of President Thomas, the College Sen- 
ate will meet in the Foyer on Tues- 
day, March 14th (instead of Thursday, 
March 16th the regular date. ) 
o 

Students Withdraw — During the 
past week the following students have 
left college: 

Freshmen — Harry Andrew Offutt and 
Paul Emanuel Utt. 

Sophomores — Richard P. Cluster and 
Melvin Wallace Nagle. 

Special — James Riley Stover. 

A. H. ESPENSHADE, Registrar. 



CALENDAR 

TUESDAY, March 7 

The Liberal Arts lecture course to- 
night at 7 o'clock in Old Chapel, will 
be "Vitamines and Human Nutrition" 
by Professor R. A. Dutcher. 

WEDNESDAY, March 8 
Research Staff — There will be a meet- 
ing of the Research Staff of the School 
of Agriculture and Experiment Station 
in Room 3 Agr. Bldg. at 4:30 p. m., 
Wednesday the 8th. 

FRIDAY, March 10 

J. J. Gibson of the Westinghouse 
Electric and Machine Company will lec- 
ture March 10th in 200 Engineering D, 
on "Salesmanship for Engineers." 

The Thespians, Auditorium, Friday 
p. m. 

SATURDAY, March 11 

Club Guest Night — Saturday, March 11, 
will be guest night for University Club 
members, wives, and partners, and for 
the Penn State Players, who present 
three plays at 8 o'clock. At 10 o'clock 
following the plays, there will be card 
playing; also dancing with Morrison's 
orchestra. 

Wrestling with Navy; Basketball 
with W. & J.; Boxing with Queens Uni- 
versity; all at Armory, times to be an- 
nounced. 

SUNDAY, March 12 

The Chapel speaker is the Rev. Dr. 
Hugh Black, of the Union Theological 
Seminary, New York. 

MONDAY, March 13 

Liberal Arts Faculty— The faculty of 
the Liberal Arts School will meet at 
4:30 p. m., Monday, March 13, in Room 
25, L. A. Bldg. 



EXPECT STUDENT PASTOR 

FOR PRESBYTERIANS 

The religious preference of Penn 
State students, from a list prepared by 
the Registrar, shows that Presbyterians 
lead the field with a total of 737. Meth- 
odists are second with 688 and Luther- 
ans third with 417. It is expected that 
by next fall the Pennsylvania Synod 
of the Presbyterian Church will send a 
"student pastor" here to work especial- 
ly among the Presbyterians in the stu- 
dent body. 

A total of 3193 students are included 
in the survey, but it does not include 
graduate and winter course students 
numbering about 250. Summary: 

Baptist - 115 

Brethren 12 

Christian Science 20 

Church of Christ 4 

Church of God 6 

Congregational 12 

Disciples 26 

Evangelical 32 

Greek Catholic 1 

Hebrew S5 

Lutheran 417 

Mennonite 

Methodist CSS 

Moravian 10 

Presbyterian 737 

Protestant Episcopal 177 

Reformed 232 

Roman Catholic 270 

Russian Orthodox 1 

Schwenkfelder 1 

Society of Friends 38 

Swedenborgian 3 

Unitarian 1 

United Brethren 49 

United Evangelical 20 

United Presbyterian 48 

United Zion Children 1 

Universalist 4 

No preference indicated 177 

Total 3193 

o ■ 

Dean and Mrs. Will Grant Chambers 
closed their Pittsburgh home last week 
and left for Bermuda where they will 
spend a month's vacation. 

— . o 

The new College Catalogue was start- 
ed to the printer last week. Copies will 
not be available until early May. 
_ — 

Professor D. A. Anderson w r as in Chi- 
cago recently attending the meetings of 
the National Educational Association 
and affiliated organizations. 
o 

John R. Haswell, Agricultural Ex- 
tension Department, visited the recent 
Pittsburgh Public Health Institute and 
exhibited farm sanitation system mod- 
els. 



ENGINEERS PERFECTING NEW 

HEAT LOSS APPARATUS 

For several years the Engineering 
Experiment Station has been studying 
the loss of heat as it passes through 
various materials from a high to a low- 
er temperature. For about six months 
study has been made of an apparatus 
designed for the purpose of comparing 
the insulative effects or the relative 
losses of heat through any kind of a 
flat wall. It is also adapted to finding 
the loss of heat from steam pipes, 
steam and gas cylinders, and in fact 
can be applied to a wide variety of pipes 
and materials. This apparatus is being 
standardized so that if successful it can 
be employed on tests of materials in 
place, such as the loss of heat through 
water settings or building walls. This 
work is being partly supported by the 
American Society of Heating & Venti- 
lating Engineers and also by the con- 
tributions of a number of firms manu- 
facturing or dealing in refrigerating 
apparatus. 

Plates will be made for different 
ranges of temperature and for different 
kinds of practical service. It is believ- 
ed that this apparatus will b>e of con- 
siderable use as a practical device for 
use in the field rather than the labor- 
atory. So far the tests have been very 
satisfactory and confidence in the ap- 
paratus seems to be well founded. 
Professor A. J. Wood is in direct 
charge of this work. 



Bryan to Speak — William Jennings 
Bryan will speak on the "Fascinating 
Game of Politics" in the Auditorium on 
Wednesday evening, March 15, at 8 
o'clock. This will be his second appear- 
ance here in two years under the aus- 
pices of Phi Kappa Phi. When he 
spoke in 1920 standing room in the 
Auditorium was at a premium. At that 
time he spoke on "Evolution" and gave 
his audience a great deal to think 
about. It is expected that he will be 
even more appealing in discussing pol- 
itics, a game that he has followed most 
of his life. Tickets are 50 and 75 cents 
and can be obtained through Dr. I. L. 
Foster, Romance Languages Depart- 
ment. 

. — o— 

President Thomas arrives in Harris- 
burg from DeLand, Fla., on Wednes- 
day night. On Friday afternoon he 
speaks before the New York State 
Teachers' Association at Rochester, and 
that evening addresses the Penn State 
Alumni in Buffalo. He will return to 
the college, Probably Saturday, March 
11. 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must ue as 
brief as possible, and reach 
D. M. Cresswell, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME I 



State College, Pa., March 14, 1922 



NUMBER 21 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

THIS BULLETIN IS OFFICIAL 
It is desired to call the attention of 
every faculty member to tlie fact that 
the Faculty Bulletin is the only OFFI- 
CIAL method of communication on all 
matters of importance involving' college 
administration. The College Senate lias 
established the Bulletin in order that 
faculty members may be held responsi- 
ble lor official notices appearing" there- 
in; this is the only official organ in the 
college in which instructors may ob- 
tain certain NECESSARY information. 
It is therefore important that each in- 
structor keep a file of Bulletins for fu- 
ture reference. 

Notices of school faculty meetings 

! over the name of the proper authority, 
will henceforth appear in hold lace type 
under tlie heading- of "Calendar." It is 
therefore of great importance that each 
faculty member read carefully each 

I week the columns devoted to "Official 
Notices" and the "Calendar." 

JOHN M. THOMAS, President. 



COLLEGE SENATE TONIGHT— - The 

March meeting of the College Senate 
will be held this evening. Tuesday, in- 
stead of Thursday, in the Foyer of the 
Auditorium. Because of the Liberal 
Arts lecture at 7 o'clock, the hour of 
the Senate meeting has been changed 
from 7:30 to 8 o'clock. 



Athletes' Grade Slips — It is import- 
ant that instructors who receive slips 
from the Faculty Committee on Ath- 
letics, requesting grades of students, 
return such slips at once. The com- 
mittee usually has only a limited time, 
after obtaining a list of candidates for 
an athletic trip, in which to ascertain 
their eligibility. — Faculty Committee on 
Athletics. 

Students Withdraw — During the past 
I week the following students havte left 
college: 
Junior — Barone, George Matthew 
| (ME). 

Sophomore — Waldron, Reed Vaughn 
(CF). 

Freshmen — Lowman, Myers Glenn 
(DH). 

Miller, John Veil (RME). 
Stern, Jerome C. (DCh.) 

o 

Clarence LeRoy Johnson, member of 
the Freshman class in the School of 
Mines, died at the Glenn Sanitorium last 
Friday after a ten days' illness with 
•brain fever. 



' President Thomas will speak at the 
annual banquet of Penn State Alumni 
in New York City on Thursday even- 
ing. On Saturday at noon he will speak 
to the combined gathering of the 
Berks County Farm Bureau and the 
Reading Chamber of Commerce in 
( Reading. That evening he will attend 
the Reading alumni meeting and ban- 
quet. 



CALENDAR 

NOTE — It is the desire of the editor 
to make the Calendar a reliable and val- 
uable column. Since starting it, we 
have found the time required for its or- 
ganization eating' into that for other 
duties. We can not make half a dozen 
'phone calls to secure details every 
week, so must request that items for 
publication in the Calendar be mailed or 
'phoned to the office before 11 o'clock 
each Saturday. Unsolicited information 

us' sTKslre up this feature, and per- 
sons responsible for the origin of Cal- 
endar items are asked to cooperate. — 
The Editor. 

TUESDAY, March 14 

There will be a meeting of the School 
of Natural Sciencee faculty in the Phy- 
sics Lecture Boom at 4:30 p. m. Tues- 
day. 

College Senate, Foyer of Auditorium, 
8:00 p. m. 

Liberal Arts Lecture. "Everyday 
Uses of Metallurgy," by Dr. D. F. Mc- 
Farlancl, 7 o'clock. Old Chapel. 
WEDNESDAY, March 1.1 

William Jennings Bryan speaks on 
"Diplomacy and Politics" at 8 o'clock 
in the Auditorium. The talk will be 
centered about Mr. Bryan's impressions 
of the Washington disarmament con- 
ference. 

If Mr. Bryan is able to stay over 
n ! ght, it is possible that he will speak 
at the University Club alfter his Audi- 
torium appearance. 

The exhibition of the Birch Burdette 
Long sketch competition drawing for 
1921 will be shown in the Fine Arts 
Galleries in Old Main, from March 15 
to 22 nd. 

THURSDAY, March 16 

There will be a meeting' of the re- 
search staff of the School of Agricul- 
ture and Experiment Station in Room 
103 Agr. Bldg-., at 4:30 p. m. Thursday 
— R. L. WATTS. 

The Centre County Conservation As- 
sociation meets for dinner and busi- 
ness session at 6:30 Thursday at the 
University Club. 

SATURDAY, March 18 

Wrestling with Springfield, 2:30, Ar- 
mory; Basketball with Alumni team, 
7 : 00, Armory. 

The regular club night at the Univer- 
sity Club will be observed Saturday. 
SUNDAY, March 19 

Chapel Speaker — President George L. 
Omwake, Ursinus College. 

o 

Interesting' Facts— Of the 44 Fresh- 
men dropped from College for unsatis- 
factory scholarship at the end of the 
first semester, 34 were graduated from 
their high school in the middle third of 
their class; eight were graduated from 
the lowest third; and only two in the 
highest third. It should be added that 
only a relatively small number were 
admitted from the lowest third, and 
that a majority of those who entered 
as Freshmen were admitted from the 
highest third. 



INFORMATION ABOUT 

ADMISSON TO COLLEGE 

The Registrar of the College, who is 
now the admisison officer for all stu- 
dents except those who enter the Two- 
year Course in Agriculture, is occas- 
ionally embarrassed in his work because 
of misinformation given out by per- 
sons connected with the College. 

The attention of all college instruc- 
tors and officers is respectfully called 
to the following facts concerning the 
admission of students as candidates for 
a degree: 

1. For the coming college year we 
shall base our selection of students, 
not upon priority of application, but 
upon the relative scholastic record of 
the applicants. 

2. We shall probably not begin to 
grant any admissions until July 1, after 
;tll the high schools of Pennsylvania 
have graduated their Seniors and the 
principals have had time to fill out and 
.send in the usual certificates of en- 
trance credit. 

3. Applicants cannot enter a four- 
year course by certificate on three 
years of high school work. 

4. The only way by which an appli- 
cant can enter before completing his 
high school course is by passing en- 
trance examinations in the necessary 
15 units. Credits secured by passing 
entrance subjects before the College 
Entrance Examination Board with a 
grade of 60 per cent or more, are ac- 
cepted. 

5. Not more than five per cent of 
the total number of applicants admit- 
ted may come from outside Pennsylva- 
nia, and such applicants must be "ex- 
ceptionally well prepared." Students 
from outside the state must pay a tui- 
tion fee of $150 per annum. 

6. No students will be admitted with 
entrance conditions. 

Special Students — Since, for the past 
two years, it has not been possible to 
admit more than about one-half of the 
applicants who wish to pursue a regu- 
lar course for a degree, special students 
can not be admitted except for verv 
urgent reasons, and then only when 
their admission is strongly recommend- 
ed by the Dean of the School concern- 
ed. 

Two-year Course — Professor R. G. 
Bressler, secretary of the School of Ag- 
riculture, is the admission officer for 
the Two-year Course in Agriculture. For 
the past two years it has been possible 
to accommodate all properly qualified 
Pennsylvania applicants who wish to 
enter the Two-year Course. For the 
coming college year applicants will be 
granted admission to this course in the 
order in which their application is re- 
ceived. 

A. H. ESPENSHADE, 

Registrar. 



The University Club subscription 
dance scheduled for Friday evening has 
been cancelled. 






-■ .— „.. 



! r 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLET 



Contributions must ue a* 
brief as possible, and reach 
D. M. Cresswell, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A M. each Saturday 



VOLUME I 



State College, Pa., March 21, 1922 



NUMBER 22 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

DAYLIGHT SAVING ESTABLISHED 

The College Council of Administra- 
tion, with the approval of the College 
Senate, yesterday favored a "daylight 
saving" plan for the College, to be at- 
tained through moving the clock for- 
ward one hour on Sunday, April 2. 
The change will remain in effect until 
Sunday, October 1. 

Daylight saving was requested by 
the Student Council in a petition to the 
College Senate. Before taking final ac- 
tion the Council of Administration ob- 
tained the sentiment of individual 
members of the Borough Council and 
School Board, which was favorable 
for town cooperation. 



Students Withdraw — During the past 
week the following students have left 
college: 

Juniors 

Fox, Myrl Frances — HE. 
James, Ruth — VHE. 
Rinehart, Virginia — ML. 

Sophomores 

Bucknell, Samuel Rooker — Hit. 
Keller, Anna Laura — DS. 
Wetzel, Merle Musser — EE. 

Freshmen 
Bick, Newton Thomas — AG. 
Coover, Thelma — VHE. 
Dennis, Elizabeth Comfort — HE. 
Gallagher, Charles Michael — PM. 
Lewis, Wesley Stanton — CF. 
Walks, Preston McComis — ME. 
Winner, Ellsworth James — ME. 

2nd. Yr. 2-Yr. Agr. 
Neely, George Paul. 
A. H. ESPENSHADE, Registrar. 

CALENDAR 

TUESDAY, March 21 

Liberal Arts Lecture series, 7 o'clock 
in the Old Chapel, "Evolution, Heredity 
and Eugenics" (Illustrated) by Dr. J. 
Ben HOI. 

Recital by the Music Department pu- 
pils of piano, voice, organ and violin, 
in the Auditorium at 8 o'clock. 

THURSDAY, March 23 

Dean Stoddart and Professor Dutch- 
er will speak at the Liebig Chemical 
Society meeting in 206 Agricultural 
Bldg., at 7:30 p. m. 

SATURDAY, March 25 

Regular Club Night at the University 
Club. There will be a smoker 

SUNDAY, March 26 

Musical program for both chapels. 



MEMBERS OF THE SENATE 

In keeping with senate action taken 
March 14, will all heads of departments 
kindly canvass the members of their 
respective departments for membership 
in the National Education Association, 
and also in the Pennsylvania State 
Education Association? The annual 
dues are: in the N. E. A., $2.00, and in 
the P. S. E. A., $1.00. Each member- 
ship carries with it paid up subscrip- 
tion to the monthly magazine of the or- 
ganization. Make checks payable di- 
rectly to the associations. 

We hope to have a report from each 
member of the senate. It is desirable 
to complete this canvass by March 213. 
Please report by phone or campus mail. 
—DAVID ALLEN ANDERSON. 

Regarding the above item, attention 
is called to the following extract from 
the Senate minutes: 

"The Senate voted to authorize and 
request Dr. Anderson to call upon the 
several Heads of Departments in the 
College with a view to interesting the 
members of our general faculty in be- 
coming members of one or both of these 
two educational associations." 



o 



CHANGE ENTRANCE REQUIRE- 
MENTS FOR NATURAL SCIENCE 

By vote of the College Senate on 
March 14, the specific requirement of 
two units of entrance credit in foreign 
language was dropped for admission to 
courses offered by the School of Nat- 
ural Science, the applicant being asked 
to present two "elective" units instead. 



President Thomas speaks today to 
Penn State alumni of Erie, at an alum- 
ni luncheon, and at a dinner of the 
Erie Chamber of Commerce tonight. He 
speaks to alumni at Indiana on Thurs- 
day and to the Pittsburgh alumni on 
Friday. Next Monday he will attend a 
gathering of Penn State graduates in 
York. 



A. A. U. P. Grants Charter— The 

American Association of University 
Professors has granted a charter for a 
State College Chapter of the Associa- 
tion. The 33 local members met recent- 
ly to organize a chapter and adopted a 
constitution. The following officers 
were elected: President, I. L. Foster, 
vice-president, Jacob Tanger, Secretary, 
J. Ben Hill and Treasurer, M. W. Price. 
The following committees were apoint- 
ed: Program Committee, Chairman F. 
L. Pattee, D. A. Anderson, II. B. Shat- 
tuck, W. A. Broyles, D. C. Duncan , 
Membership Committee, Chairman E. 
H. Dusham, E. J. Kunze, J. P. Kelly, C. 
E. Marquardt. 



COLLEGE HAS LARGEST 

ENROLLMENT IN HISTORY 
The summary of students at Penn 
State that will appear in the new cat- 
alogue includes the following informa- 
tion: 

There are 132 candidates for advanc- 
ed degrees, 119 men and 13 women. 
Four year course class enrollments fol- 
low: 

Seniors, 563 men and 71 women, to- 
tal 034, (including those graduated at 
mid-year). 

Juniors, 005 men and 70 women, to- 
tal 675. 

Sophomores, OSS men and 81 women, 
total 769. 

Freshmen, S44 men and 77 women, 
total 921. Grand total, 2700 men and 
299 women, or 2999 students. 

There are 41 men and 8 women in 
the unclassified list. In the two year 
agricultural course there are 220 men 
and two women. The enrollment for 
the winter course in agriculture was 
124. In the last Summer Session there 
were 531 men and 1374 women, or a 
total of 1905 students. 

Allowing for names occurring twice, 
the college during the year 1921-22 
boasts a total enrollment of 3507 men 
and 1680 women, or a grand total of 
51S7, the largest in the history of the 
institution. 



o 



Local A. A. A. S. Elects— The State 
College, Pennsylvania Branch of the 
Association for the Advancement of 
Science, met recently at the University 
Club for organization. A constitution 
was adopted and the following officers 
were elected: Chairman, A. J. Wood. 
Vice-Chairman, C. W. Orton, Secretary, 
J. Ben Hill and Treasurer, C. A. Hun- 
ter. In addition, an executive commit- 
tee was formed, consisting of the offi- 
cers and three elected members, R. A. 
Dutcher, E. H. Dusham and F. D. 
Kern. The speaker was Dean Watts, 
who illustrated the essentials of a scien- 
tist by the lives of Dr. H. P. Armsby 
and Dr. William Frear. The local 
branch has about 45 members. 



RIG TEX DINNER 

A Big Ten (Middle-West) Conference 
Dinner will be held Tuesday, April 4th, 
in the Women's Building. Graduates 
of the State Universities of Ohio, In- 
diana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, 
Minnesota and Iowa, Northwestern 
University, University of Chicago and 
Purdue are reminded that they should 
notify the chairman of their Fn-'versity 
Group before Friday, March 24th, if 
they wish plates reserved. 



p r 



13 ? ' x I * ' CLOG. 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 



Contributions must toe as 
brief as possible, and reach 
D. M. Cresswell, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME I 



State College, Pa., March 28, 1922 



NUMBER 23 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

CLASS GRADES OF 

FRATEltMTY ME1S 

In accordance with an action taken 
by the General Faculty all members of 
the teaching staff are requested to 
make a prompt return of the cards 
furnished by fraternity men from time 
to time for their currant grade. This 
grade should be given by letter, and 
the actual number of absences should 
be indicated. Although compliance with 
this request entails some labor, exper- 
ience shows that the labor thus spent 
does actually stimulate fraternity men 
to keep above garde" in their studies. 
JOHN M. THOMAS. 



Senate co^ stitutiok 

03 other side 

For the benefit of members of the 
general faculty, as well as members of 
the College iSenate, the full text of the 
College Senate constitution and by-laws 
is printed on the reverse side of this 
week's Faculty Bulletin. All faculty 
members are urged to read it carefully 
and preserve this copy for future ref- 
erence. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 
During the past week the following 
students have left college: 
Sophomores 
Carpenter, Gerald Francis, ICh. 
Gregson, Robert W., IB. 
Waring, Fred M., AE. 
Benson, Allen G., CE. 
Freshmen 
O'Donnell, Cornelius James, PM. 
o 

DAYLIGHT SAVING GOES INTO 
EFFECT AT 12:01 SUNDAY MORN- 
ING. SET TIMEPIECES AHEAD 
ONE HOUR. 



LARGEST GRADUATING CLASS 
The candidates for graduation on 
June 13 of this year number 545, and 
they will make up the largest class 
that the college has ever graduated at 
any one time. As the list now stands, 
the totals by schools follow: 

Agriculture 136 

Engineering 196 

Liberal Arts 99 

Mines 23 

Natural Science 71 

Dept. Home Economics 20 

o 

All persons who have rooms to rent, 
and who can accommodate visitors at 
the time of the Junior Prom, April 28, 
are asked to inform the Y. M. C. A. of- 
fice. 



CALENDAR 

TUESDAY, March 28 

Liberal Arts Lecture series: "What is 
Bernard Shaw?" by Dr. W. S. Dye, Old 
Chapel, 7 o'clock. 

THURSDAY, March 30 

State Conservation delegates meet 
for discussion of the organization of a 
State Conservation Council, starting 
with a dinner at McAllister Hall at 
7 : 30 p. m. 

FRIDAY, March 31 

State Conservation meetings contin- 
ued, morning and afternoon, Room 100 
Hort. 

Ladies' Night at the University Club. 
Informal. Make reservations before 
Wednesday with the steward. (.NOTE: 
The house rules of the Club include the 
following statement: "Ladies' nights 
are to be restricted to club members, 
their partners, adult members of their 
families and out-of-town guests"). 

Interscholastic basketball champion- 
ships, Armory, evening. 

SATURDAY, April 1 

Final game for state interscholastic 
basketball title, Armory, afternoon. 

TURN YOUR WATCH AND CLOCK 
FORWARD ONE HOUR BEFORE RE- 
TIRING. 

SUNDAY, April 2 

Chapel speaker — The Rev. Dr. G. G. 
Atkins, pastor of the First Congrega- 
tional Church of Detroit, Mich. 



There is now an exhibition of coll : 
etchings by Bernard Boutel de Monvel 
in the Fine Arts Museum of the De- 
partment of Architecture in Old Main 
to remain until April 7th. The Mu- 
seum will be open on Sunday after- 
noons during this exhibition. 



-u 



Professor Pattee delivered the an- 
nual Recognition Day lecture before 
the Phi Beta Kappa of Ohio Wesleyan 
University on March 16, on the sub- 
ject "The Voice of the Last Border." 



Dr. F. D. Kern will act as toastmast- 
er for the Big Ten dinner to be held in 
the Women's Building on Tuesday, April 
4. The friendly rivalry exhibited so 
frequently on the athletic fields of the 
universities represented will again be 
seen as their alumni hold their respec- 
tive lines against rivals at the banquet 
table. 



CONSERVATION MEETING 

A very important gathering of dele- 
gates from state and county organiza- 
tion's interested in the conservation of 
natural resources, will be held here on 
Thursday and Friday of this week under 
the auspices of the college. The object 
of the convention is to form a State 
Consevation Council to act as an ad- 
visory body on all matters pertaining 
to conservation that might be brought 
up by these individual organizations. 
The state forestry, fish and game com- 
missioners are expected to attend and 
give an outline of the future policies of 
their respective departments. 

The committee on arrangements re- 
quests faculty members to look over 
the list of names of those people ex- 
pected, which will appear in today's is- 
sue of the Penn State Collegian, and if 
they desire to entertain any of the vis- 
itors to notify the Forestry Depart- 
ment office to that effect. The fores- 
try office also desires to secure room- 
ing facilities for visitors, and if any 
faculty members have rooms available, 
they are asked to advise that office al 
once. 



Through recent action by the State 
Board of Examiners of Architecture, 
the Department of Architecture at Penn 
State was placed on the accredited list, 
making graduates eligible to register as 
architects without examination after 
they have had the required three years 
of training in the office of a practic- 
ing architect. They will be considered 
under Class A, which is the highest rat- 
ing. The action includes the graduates 
of 1918 and those of each year since 
then. 



Faculty members who desire to pur- 
chase a student garden, 30 by 50 feet, 
for $8.00, are asked to notify Professor 
Pelton's office not later than April 1st, 
as these gardens will be placed on gen- 
eral sale at that time. The Vegetable 
Gardening Division cultivates these 
garden's during the summer, and pur- 
chasers remove the vegetables as they 
ripen. 

o 

Professor George R. Green talked to 
the Audubon Society of Western Penn- 
sylvania last Saturday in Pittsburgh on 
"Trees and their Relation to Birds." 



Penn State rifle teams placed first 
and fourth in the preliminary matches 
held in this area, comprising the states 
of Pennsylvania, Maryland and Vir- 
ginia. The two teams have already 
started firing in the indoor range for 
the national championship in which ap- 
proximately fifty college teams are en- 
tered. 

o ■ 

(OVER) 



CONSTITUTION AM) BY-LAWS 

OF THE COLLEGE SENATE 



CONSTITUTION 

Article I. 

MEMBERSHIP 

Section 1. — The following shall be 
members of the College Senate: 

The President of the College, The 
Deans of the several Sehols, the Dean 
of Men. the Dean of Wlomen, the Di- 
rector of the Institute of Animal Nu- 
trition, the Director of the Health Ser- 
vice, the Librarian, the Registrar (Sec- 
retary), the Comptroller, the Directors 
of Extension, the Director of the Sum- 
mer Session, the Heads (or Acting 
Heads) of Departments of resident in- 
struction or research, and three repre- 
sentatives annually elected from each 
school faculty. (Note: In case the 
head of a department is also a Dean 
that department shal have a represent- 
ative.) 

Section 2. Membership is individual 
and not transferable. 

Article II. 
FUNCTIONS 

Section 1.— The College Senate tliLtll 
lie the sole legislative body mi all ques- 
tions that pertain to the educational 
interests of the College, subject to the 
jurisdiction of the Board of Trustees, 
and on all matters that concern more 
than one faculty. Among these are: 

1. Educational Policy. 

2. Courses of study and curricula. 

3. Admision requirements. 

4. Graduation requirements. 

">. Approving candidates for degrees. 
G. Awards of scholarships ami hon- 
ors. 

7. College calendar. 

8. Regulations affecting students. 
Section 2.— The College Senate shall 

interpret its legislation when necessary. 
Section 3. — In case of question of jur- 
isdiction the power of decision shall 
rest with the President of the College. 

BY-LAWS 

Article I. 

OFFICERS 

Section 1.— The officers of the College 
Senate shall be a Chairman and a Sec- 
retary. 

Section 2. — The President of the Col- 
lege shall be Chairman of the College 
Senate. In his absence one of the 
Deans, designated by the President, 
shall act as Chairman: or, when no 
Dean has thus been designated, the 
Dean senior in order of appointment 
shall serve as Chairman. 

Section 3.— The Registrar of the Col- 
shall bo the secretary of the Col- 
li -' Senate. In his absence the Chair- 
man shall appoint a secretary pro tem- 
pore. 

Section 4. — The duties of the Chair- 
in. in and the Secretary shall be those 
usually pertaining to these offices. 
Article II. 
STANDING COMMITTEES 
OF THE COLLEGE SENATE 

Section 1. — The standing committees 
nf the College Senate shall be the fol- 
lowing: 

(a) Admission. 3 members and the 
Registrar ex-offlcio, 

ii.i Graduate study. r> members. 

(c) Athletics, 5 members. 

uli student Welfare. 5 members. 

(e) Publications, 4 members and the 
( !olli ;■'. Editor ex-offlcio. 

(f) Academic Standards, 3 members 
and the College Examiner c\ -officio. 

fgi Courses of Study, "> members. 

(h) Resi irch, 5 mi mbers. 

Section 2. —The Senate shall appoint 



a Committee on Committees to confer 
with the President of the College in 
the appointment of the standing com- 
mittees. The President of the College 
shall designate the chairman of each 
committee. Appointments shall he 
made at the first meeting of each col- 
lege year and the committees shall 
serve until new committees have been 
appointed. The President of the Col- 
lege shal be ex-officio a member of all 
Standing Committees. 

Section 3. — Particular Duties of the 
several Standing Committees: 

(a) Admission: — It shall be the duty 
of the Committee on Admission to ad- 
minister entrance examinations, to 
r c i amend any desirable change in the 
requirements for admission, and to de- 
termine unusual or difficult problems 
of admission or certificate credit that 
the Registrar may refer to it. 

tli) Graduate Study: — It shall be the 
duty of the Committee on Graduate 
Study to make recommendations con 
corning admission to graduate courses 
| lie different advanced degrees to be 
conferred, and the requirements for the 
several degrees; to approve and recom- 
mend to the Senate for adoption all 
purely graduate courses; to determine 
the eligibility of all candidates for ad- 
vanced degrees; and to consider meth- 
ods of improving and extending grad- 
uate study. 

(c) Athletics: — It shall be the duty 
of the Committee on Athletics to ad- 
vise with the Department of Physical 
Education in the regulation and super- 
vision of physical activities; to deter- 
mine eligibil'ty of players; and to ap- 
prove schedules for all athletic contests. 

(d) .Student Welfare:— It shall be 
the duty of the Committee on Student 
Welfare to study, with the Dean of 
.Men and the Dean of Women, all 
problems, not academic, athletic, or 
journalistic, bearing on student welfare 
and morale; e. g.. student health, hous- 
ing conditions, entertainments, fratern- 
ities and other organizations: to advise 
the Senate of any needed legislation on 
these subjects; and to advise with the 
Dean of Men and the Dean of Women 
as to means of carrying out the decis- 
ions of the Senate. 

(e) Publications :< — It shall be the 
duty of the Committee on College Pub- 
lications to co-operate with the Public- 
ity Department in the issue of the 
Pennsylvania State (College Bulletin, 
including the general catalogue, and 
other publications of the College; and 
to recommend to the College Senate 
means for the regulation and better- 
ment of student publications. 

(f) Academic Standards: — It shall 
be the duty of the Committee on 
Academic Standards to make recom- 
mendations for the maintenance of 
standards and the equity of grades be- 
tween courses and schools; to deter- 
mine questions of credit from other col- 
legiate and professional schools; to de- 
vise encouragements of scholarship; 
and to recommend awards of honors, 
prizes and scholarships. 

(g) Courses of Study:— It shall be 
the duty of the Committee on Courses 
of Study to consider all recommenda- 
tions of new curricula, the introduc- 
tion of new semester and Summer Ses- 
sion undergraduate courses, and the 
dropping of old ones, made by the sev- 
eral schools; to study the curricula of 
the college with reference to the needs 
of students and the opportunities of 
service to the state: and to make rec- 
ommendations on changes in curricula 
to the Senate. 



(h) Research: — It shall be the duty 
of the Committee on Research to study 
the needs of the Institution and its op- 
portunities for public service through 
research ; to emphasize the importance 
of research; to consider methods of pro- 
moting and stimulating interest in pro- 
ductive scholarship; to aid in organiz- 
ing and disseminating information con- 
cerning the research work of the col- 
lege; and to contribute every possible 
effort toward securing increased sup- 
port for research. 

Section 4. — General Duties of the 
Standing Committees: 

It shall be the duty of each standing 
committee (1) to consider and present 
a report to the College Senate concern- 
ing any matter specifically referred to 
it; (.2) to make recommendations of 
definite legislation on subjects connect- 
ed with its particular field; and (3) 
at the May meeting of the College Sen- 
ate to make a written report in dupli- 
cate summarizing its activities during 
the current college year. 
Article III. 
SPECIAL COMMITTEES 

Section 1. — Special committees for the 
consideration of subjects not already 
assigned to a Standing Committee, may 
be appointed at any meeting of the 
College Senate, in such manner as that 
body may determine. 

Article IV. 
MEETINGS 

Section 1. — Regular meetings of the 
College Senate shall be held at 7:30 p. 
m on the third Thursday of each 
'month from September to May inclu- 
sive, except as otherwise provided in 
Section 3, Article IV. 

Section 2. — Special meetings may he 
called at any time by the President of 
the College, and shall be called upon 
the written request of one-fifth of the 
members. All members shall be noti- 
fied in advance. 

Section 3. — By a majority vote of the 
members present, the date for any reg- 
ular meeting may be changed at the 
regular or 'special meeting next preced- 
ing the usual date therefor. 
Article V. 
RULES OF PROCEDURE 

Section 1. — A quorum for the trans- 
action of business shall consist of a ma- 
jority of the members. 

Section 2.. — All motions, except where 
otherwise specified, shall be determined 
by a majority of the votes cast. 

Section 3. — These by-laws may he 
amended at any regular meeting, writ- 
ten notice of the proposal to amend 
having been presented at a preceding 
regular meeting. 

Section 4. — The order of business 
shall be as follows: 

(a) 
ing. 



(b) 

ficers. 
(c) 
(d) 
(e) 
(f) 
This 



Minutes of the preceding meet- 
Communications of College Of- 



Reports of Standing Committes. 
Reports of Special Committees. 
Unfinished business. 
New Business, 
section may be suspended at 



any meeting by a two-thirds vote of 
the members present. 

Section 5. — The rules of procedure in 
lite metings of the College Senate, ex- 
cept as they are otherwise specified in 
these by-laws, shall be those presented 
in Reed's Rules. 

Section 6. — New college rules and 
amendments to existing college rules 
shall be adopted only after they have 
been presented in writing at a preced 
ing meeting of the College Senate. 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must t>e as 
brief as possible, and reach 
D. M. Oesswell, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME I 



State College, Pa., April 4, 1922 



NUMBER 24 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



CALENDAR 



SENATE MEETS APRIL 27 

The date for the April meeting 1 of the 
College Senate lias been changed from 
(Lprll 20 to April 27.— A, H. Espenshade, 
"Secretary. 

STUDEN TS WITHDRA W 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 
Junior 
Pfeiffer, Fred, ME. 

Freshmen 
Bdgerton, Charles Taylor, But 
Stern, Mitchel, ICh. 

2-Year Agricultural 

Endsley, Jack Hagey, 1st Year. 

Specials 

Brubaker, Ara Weaver. 
Stevenson, Doris. 

A. H. ESPENSHADE, Registrar. 

Death 

Gerald Francis Carpenter, of the 
Sophomore class (ICh), son of Daniel 
B, Carpenter, of the class of 1S99, died 
)f appendicitis at his home in Scran- 
.on on March 30. 

FACTS ABOUT PENNSYLVANIA 

Professor Espenshade has compiled 
he following interesting geographical 
acts about Pennsylvania, which are 
>ased upon the 1920 census: 

Pennsylvania, has 981 incorporated 
)laces, of which 36 are cities and 945 
ore boroughs. The smallest city is Cor- 
y, in Erie County, with a population of 
',228. The largest borough is Norris- 
own, in Montgomery County, with 32,- 
il9 people. The smallest borough is 
Woodcock, in Crawford County, with 
inly 81 persons. 

The total population of the state is 
720,017, which represents an increase 
if 1,054,906 over the census of 1910. 
The "urban population," that is, peo- 
)le living in 314 cities and boroughs 
jvith a population of 2,500 or more, is 
|',607,815, or 64.3 per cent of the total. 
Fhe urban population has increased by 
learly four per cent during the past de- 
•ade. 

Of the urban population, 3,537,347 
ive in 20 cities and boroughs with a 
lopulation of 25,000 or more; and more 
han five million live in 170 cities and 
owns with a population of 5,000 or 
aore. 

Of the so-called "rural population," 
79,924 live in 659 incorporated bor- 
'Ughs with a population of less than 
,500 each. 

In 47 out of the 67 counties, the rural 
'opulation exceeds the urban popula- 
ion. In the following nine counties, 
he population is wholly rural — that is, 
hey contain no towns with a popula- 
ion of 2,500: Bedford, Forest, Fulton, 
uniata, Perry, Pike, Snyder, Sullivan 
nd Wyoming. 



Y 



/ 



/ 



TUESDAY, April 4 

Engineering lecture by a representa- 
tive of the Willys-Overland Company: 
"Why We Build the Kniglit as We Do." 
Room 200 Engineering D, 4:30 o'clock. 
A running model of the Knight auto- 
mobile engine will be on exhibition in 
: he Mechanical Engineering Labora- 
tory all afternoon. 



Women s Eujldm^ 



Big Ten dinnei 
at 5:45 p. m. 

WEDNESDAY, April 5 

Mooting of the Faculty oi (he School 
the Liberal Arts will l>e held at 4:80 
a., in room 25 of the Liberal Arts 
Luiidiiig'. The meeting has been ad- 
van.ed from Apiil 12 because of the 
Easier vacation beginning on that day. 
— L. V. T. Simmons, Secretary. 

FRIDAY, April 7 

"Clarence," by the Penn State Play- 
ers, in the Auditorium, at 8:15 o'clock. 

University Club — McGee's String Trio 
has .been secured to give a musical pro- 
gram, and W. J. O'Donnell will sing. 

SATURDAY, April 8 

First baseball game of the season 
with Juniata College. New Beaver 
Field, 3:00 o'clock. 

"Clarence," by the Penn State Play- 
ers, in the Auditorium, at 8:15 o'clock. 

Club Night at the University Club. 
The Penn State Playeris were forced to 
cancel their engagement for this night. 

SUNDAY, April 9 

Chapel — Special Easter music by the 
College Choir. There will be no chapel 
speaker. 

MONDAY, April 10 

The Faculty Language Club will meet 
in the Foyer of the Auditorium at sev- 
en o'clock. An interesting program has 
been arranged. 



THE UNIVERSITY PROFESSORS 

A meeting of the local chapter of the 
American Association of University 
Professors is called by President Foster 
for 7:00 p. m., Tuesday, April 11, in 
200 Engineering A. 



An excellent biography of Dr. Wil- 
liam Frear appears in the March num- 
ber of the Industrial and Engineering 
Chemist, the publication of the Amer- 
ican Chemical Society, of which Dr. 
Frear was for many years a prominent 
member. The author is Dr. I. K. Phelps. 
o 

There are still several faculty mem- 
bers and their families who are very in- 
adequately housed. Anyone knowing of 
apartments or houses which are to be 
vacated is asked to notify the Y. M. C. 
A. 



APPLICANTS REFUSED ADMISSION 

By actual count the number of Penn- 
sylvania applicants who were refused 
admission to their own State College 
last summer was 628. Of this number 
358 actually submitted certificates of 
graduation from four-year high schools, 
and 270 applied for entrance blanks 
and admission after our quota of 
Freshmen bad been filled. To 
the total number who failed to secure 
admission there should be added about 
200 other applicants who received en- 
trance blanks and who did not send 
them in, presumably because they be- 
lieved that there was little chance of 
admision. If this estimated number is 
added to the 628 who actually complet- 
ed their application, the total for the 
past summer would be 82S. We have 
111 more Freshmen this year than we 
had last year. 

In the summer of 1920 the number 
of Pennsylvania applicants refused ad- 
mission was 84S. To this should be 
added about 250 who secured applica- 
tion blanks, but failed to have them re- 
turned. It seems fair to count these as 
potential applicants. If they are count- 
ed, the number who failed to secure 
admission in the summer of 1920 was 
1098. 

The number refused admission for 
preceding years, based upon conserva- 
tive estimates, was: 

In 1919 450 

In 1918 650 

In 1917 350 

In 1916 __ 340 

In 1915 250 

o 

ADVANCED DEGREES IN JUNE 

The probable number of advanced de- 
grees to be conferred at the June Com- 
mencement is 29, as follows: 

Master of Arts 6 

Master of Science 13 

Mechanical Engineer 4 

Electrical Engineer 2 

Civil Engineer 1 

Mining Engineer 1 

Metallurgical Engineer 1 

Industrial Engineer 1 

The last two degrees have never be- 
fore been conferred by this college. 
— o 

PLAYERS IN "CLARENCE" 

The Penn State Players will again 
make their appearance in the Auditor- 
ium on Friday and Saturday nights of 
this week, this time in Booth Tarking- 
ton's popular comedy "Clarence." Play- 
er productions have been improving 
with each new attempt and "Clarence" 
is expected to come up to this standard. 
Prices: Lower floor and centre balcony, 
75 cents; side balcony, 50 cents. 

o 

Professor R. A. Dutcher addressed 
the Cornell Section of the American 
Chemical Society recently on "Certain 
Aspects of the Vitamine Hypothesis." 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must oe aa 
brief as possible, and reach 
D. M. Cresswell, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME I 



State College, Pa., April 11, 1922 



NUMBER 25 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

EASTER RECESS 

By action of the College Senate, the 
EasterRecess extends from 5:20 p.m. on 
Wednesday, April 12 to 8 a. m. Thurs- 
day, April 20. 

— — o 

SENATE MEETING 

The next meeting of the College Sen- 
ate will be on the evening of Thurs- 
day, April 27, instead of April 20. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 

Sophomore 

MaeGregor, James P., DH. 
Freshman 

Barclay, John Marshall, CF. 
Two-Year Agric. 

Griffin, William Craig, 1st Yr. 

o— 

The next issue of the Faculty Bul- 
letin will be dated April 25. 

COMMUNITY GARDENERS MEETING 

All faculty members interested in 
I gardening, or the growing of tree fruits, 
j small fruits, vegetables, flowers, shrubs, 
I lawns, etc., are invited to attend a com- 
) munity gardening meeting to be held 
in the Pastime theatre building on 
I Thursday night of this week, at 8 
o'clock. The Clean Town committee of 
I the Chamber of Commerce has called 
the meeting for the purpose of arous- 
ing interest in the formation of a gar- 
I den club. Opportunity will he afford- 
ed home gardeners for presenting their 
I problems at a round table discussion, 
': and there will he talks on different 
| branches of horticulture by various 
members of the agricultural faculty. 
There will be an illustrated lecture en- 
titled the "Flower and Vegetable Oar- 
den." 



-o- 



SENATOR PEPPER COMING 

George Wharton Pepper, United 
States Senator from Pennsylvania, has 
accepted an invitation to visit the col- 
lege early in May. A more definite an- 
nouncement and arrangements for the 
visit will be published later. 



PREPARE FOR MUSIC WEEK 

Director Robinson of the Music De- 
partment met with a large representa- 
tive committee of college and town peo- 
ple at the University Club last night to 
discuss plans for the State and Nation- 
al "Music Week" to be observed April 
30 to May 6. 



CALENDAR 

TUESDAY, April 11 

Meeting of local chapter of the 

American Association of University 

Professors, 7 o'clock p. m. in Engineer- 
ing A. 

WEDNESDAY, April 12 

Easter Recess begins, 5:20 p. m. 

THURSDAY, April 13 

r 'u.nmunity Gardening meeting, Pas- 
Lime Building, 8:00 p. m. 

THURSDAY, April 20 

Easter Recess closes, 8:00 a. m. 
SATURDAY, April 22 

Baseball, Gettysburg at home. 

Music Department and "Y" enter- 
tainment course, Montraville Wood, 
"scientific entertainer," Auditorium. 

SUNDAY, April 23 

Chapel speaker: The Rev. Dr. Wil- 
lam 'L. Sawtelle, pastor of the First 
Presbyterian Church, Scranton. 

SIGMA XI ORGANIZED 

Local members of the Sigma Xi, 
scientific honorary society, have met 
a ad adopted a simple constitution, or- 
ganizing for the purpose of emphasiz- 
ing scientific research. Dean Sackett 
is chairman, R. B. Nesbitt, secretary 
i id Dean Moore, member of the pro- 
gram committee. It is hoped that a 
Sigma Xi speaker from a distance may 
be obtained and a public meeting held 
before the end of the year. 



The ninety-six faculty members who 
attended the "Big Ten" Conference din- 
ner last week included no less than 
ive deans, seven department heads, 
the director of athletics, the superin- 
tendent of grounds and buildings and 
the secretary of the "Y." 



VACATION TRAIN 

A special eastbound train will leave 
Lemont on Wednesday evening at 5 
o'clock, standard time. It will arrive 
at Sunbury at 7:30 p. m. If trafic de- 
mands, sections will continue to Wilkes- 
Barre and Harrisburg. A fast train 
will stop at Tyrone on Wednesday at 
5:08 (standard time) arriving in Pitts- 
burgh at 8:30 p. m. There will be no 
specials returning on April 19 or 20. 
o 

President Thomas addressed the Penn 
State alumni of Boston and vicinity at 
Boston on Saturday night. On Sunday 
he spoke to the Wellesley College stu- 
dents. On April 18 he is scheduled to 
address the Rotary Club of Altoona. 



PRESIDENT TELLS OF 

BUILDING FUND CAMPAIGN 

College and town development prob- 
lems held the attention of the 140 mem- 
bers of the Chamber of Commerce with 
their wives who attended the dinner 
meeting in McAllister Hall last Thurs- 
day night. Some very interesting side- 
lights were heard on the subject from 
the speakers, President Thomas, Bur- 
gess Sauers, President Webber of Coun- 
cil, President McDowell of the School 
Board and J. L. Holmes. 

President Thomas spoke particularly 
of the coming campaign for a $2,000,000 
emergency building fund. He said that 
this campaign must be made a success 
— that much of the college future hangs 
upon it being made a success. 

"We must sacrifice ourselves in con- 
siderable amounts and help in a way 
that looks really large," President 
Thomas said. "If we fail here we will 
be unable to get the institution recog- 
nition anywhere. I personally feel that 
it is a great opportunity and that we 
can make it a success. I wouldn't swap 
my job for any like it in the country, 
because there is so much to do. We 
1 re going to have lots of fun doing 
hings here in State College. 

"If we can go to Harrisburg 1 with the 
impetus of 'success in this campaign the 
effect will be wonderful. We must have 
a sentiment that will be Irresistible. The 
will of the masses does not register in 
figures. 

"If an educational expert were to 
visit Penn State and make a survey, he 
would tell us to cut down on our activ- 
ities — cut the garment to the cloth — 
and probably tell us to go back to teach- 
ing agriculture alone. But the law will 
not allow this — he would overlook the 
fact that we must teach the mechanic 
arts. The trustees will not throw away 
anything. They will fight until we get 
the support necessary for adequate 
growth for the whole thing. That is 
why I made the suggestion that we 
change to the State University. 

"If we have recognition as The Penn- 
sylvania State University, we will have 
recognition throughout. The matter 
has simmered down in the legislature 
that we have ad general support for 
agriculture, and the other schools get 
what they can. It will always be so 
until we are recognized officially as the 
State University." 

AAnnouncement was made that Bor- 
ough Council will ask the voters at the 
May 16 primaries to approve a $45,000 
bond issue for sewer and fire fighting 
equipment improvement, and the School 
Board will ask $17,000 or more for 
school expansion through the erection 
of a grade building west of Gill street 
between Foster and Nittany Avenues. 



C K Z T T . 
1 3 MA I N B'L DC 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

'LLETIN 



Contributions must oe as 
brief as possible, and reach 
D. M. Cresswell, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME I 



State College, Pa., April 25, 1922 



NUMBER 26 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



SENATE MEETING 

The April meeting' of the College 
Senate will be he'd in the Foyer of the 
Auditorium at 7:30 p. in.. Thursday, 
April 27. 

STUDENTS WITHDRAW 
During the past week the following 
students left college: 

Sophomore 
Scanlon, John Joseph, BE. 
Freshmen 

Morris, John Elliott, Mug. 
Weaver, George Calvin, EE. 

PRESIDENT HARDING 

COMMENDS PESN STATE 

President Thomas, Alumni Secretary 
Sullivan and 'members of the student 
'varsity quartet called at the White 
House last Saturday while in Washing- 
ton to attend the Pennsylvania Soc- 
iety meeting and the Washington 
Alumni Club dinner, and spoke for a 
few minutes with President Harding. 
Dr. Thomas said that the four students 
represented 3200 others at Penn State, 
an enrollment that might have been 
twice as large had the college not been 
forced to refuse admission to so many. 
President Harding congratulated the 
group upon Penn State's marvel- 
out growth and gave best wishes 
in our eiforts as one of the National 
colleges to provide adequate facilities 
tor ail Pennsylvania students seeking 
admission. President Harding recalled 
the lacL that his cousin, Professor John 
T. Marshman, was a. former member of 
the Penn State faculty, now profetsor 
of public speak. ng at Ohio Wesleyan. 



MEMORIAL DAY COMMITTEE 

At the suggestion of the Council of 
Administration, President Thomas nas 
appointed the following committee to 
devise a suitable program for public 
exercises on Memorial Day, in consul- 
tation with a representative of rhe lo- 
cal post of the American Legion: Pro- 
fessors E. D. Walker, W. S. Dye and 
F. D. Kern. 



Golf Fee $15 and $5 

It was voted at the trustee meeting 
that the charges for the use of the golf 
course as approved by the Board Nov- 
ember 4, 1921, be revised with reference 
to members of the faculty and other 
employees of the college to provide for 
the payment of an annual fee of $15.00 
per person with an additional charge 
of $5.00 for each additional member of 
the employee's family. 



CALENDAE 

TUESDAY, April 25 

There will be a meeting' of the Agri- 
cultural School faculty this (Tuesday) 
afternoon at 4:30 in 103 Agriculture 
Bldg. 

WEDNESDAY, April 26 

The A. A. A. S. meets at 7:30 p. m. 
in Room 200 Engineering D. 

THURSDAY, April 27 

College Senate, 7:30 p. m., Auditor- 
ium foyer. 

There will be a meeting' of the Re- 
search Staff of the School of Agricul- 
ture and Experiment Station in Room 
10... Agriculture Building', at 4:30 p. m. 
Thnisday. 

FRIDAY, April 28 

Junior Prom, Armory. 

Penn State Players and others, in- 
cluding K. W. G. Domma, the Liberian 
student, in benefit performance for Li- 
berian Agricultural School fund, in the 
Auditorium. 

SATURDAY, April 29 

Varsity Baseball — Bucknell Univer- 
sity. 

MONDAY, May 1 

The regular monthly meeting of the 
Agricultural Extension force will be 
held Monday, May 1st, at 10:00 A. M. 
in Director McDowell's office in the 
Agricultural Building. Members of the 
Agricultural Faculty are extended an 
invitation to attend. 

TfTfgliiT'ftflf""""" 1 ' J^"-'-" ■'■'■'■ »»"»»"»— •■""^BTIini Mil III 'IIIW l^-TtifgT'ir wj -nn» 

A. A. A. S. TO MEET 

A scientific program will be the fea- 
ture of a meeting of the State College 
Branch of the American Association 
for the Advancement of Science to be 
held at 7:30 P. M. Wednesday, April 
26, 1922 in Room 200 Engineering D. 

At the meeting Professor E. A. Fes- 
oenden, of the Mechanical Engineering 
Department, will speak on "Researches 
m Heat Transmission" and H. W. Popp, 
of the Botany Department, will tell of 
his studies on the "Effect of Ultra Vio- 
let Light on Plants." All members of 
the Association for the Advancement 
of Science and all prospective members 
are invited to attend. 

o 

The Phi Beta Kappa Alumni Asso- 
ciation of the college held its spring 
meeting at the University Club recent- 
ly. Before an audience composed of 
members and their invited guests, the 
poem of the evening was read by its 
author, Dr. Crockett, and the address, 
.on Student Life in the Middle Ages, 
«*aj3 delivered by Dr. D. B. Shumway, 
heaa^-^t..^ the Department of German, 
University of Pennsylvania. 



COLLEGE HAS 14,C0O 

EXTRA-MURAL STUDES TS 

The following tabulation indicates 
the number of extra-mural students 
who have been pursuing studies by cor- 
respondence and in teacher-training and 
extension classes during the academic 
year 1921-2 under the auspices of The 
Pennsylvania State College. 

1. In Non-Resident Teacher-Train- 
ing Classes: 

In Home Economics 86 

In Mining (estimated) 130 

In Trades and Industries 433 

Total - 049 

2. In Extension Courses: 

In Educational Subjects 1G42 

In Engineering Subjects (at 
Manufacturing and Industrial 

Centres) 3300 

In Mining Subjects ., 800 

Total 5742 

3. In Correspondence Courses: 

In Agriculture 3220 

In Education 85 

In Engineering ,.... 3450 

In Home Economics 7S0 

Total , 7535 

Grand Total of Extra Mural Stu- 
dents ...13,927 

o ■ 

WOOD SUCCEEDS FESSENDEN 

AS M. E. DEPARTMENT HEAD 

The executive committee of the Col- 
lege Board of Trustees at its recent 
meeting selected A. J. Wood, professor 
of railway mechanical engineering, to 
succeed Professor E. A. Fessenden as 
head of the Mechanical Engineering 
Department. Professor Wood has been 
connected with the engineering school 
faculty for 18 years. Since the estab- 
lishment of the Engineering Experiment 
Station here, he has done much for the 
advancement of scientific research at 
the college, particularly in the -matter of 
heat transmission projects. He will as- 
sume his duties as head of the me- 
chanical engineering department next 
September. 

The resignation of Professor Fessen- 
den, expected for the past several 
months, was accepted by the Trustees, 
but not without regret at losing him 
as a department head. He has accept- 
ed the post as head of the mechanical 
engineering department at the Rensse- 
laer Polytechnic Institute, at Troy, N. 
Y. He will remain here until after the 
close of the present collegiate year, or 
about July 1st. 

o 

United States Senator Pepper will 
make a visit to the town on May 10th 
instead of the 11th as was announced 
in the last Bulletin. 

o '■ — — 

(OVER) 



TRUSTEES APPROVE MANY 

COLLEGE FACULTY CHANGES 

At the meeting of the Executive 
Committee of the Board of Trustees 
held April 14th, the following faculty 
personnel changes were made: 

Resignations 

E. A. Fessenden, Professor of Me- 
chanical Engineering, effective June 30. 

J. X. Bastress, Instructor in Civil 
Engineering, effective January 31. 

W. B. Gery, Instructor in Chemist:, 
effective March 1 . 

R. C. Harlow, Assistant Professor of 
Physical Education, effective May 25. 

Jane Humphrey, Instructor in Home 
Economics, effective January 2S. 

Raymond Peterson, Assistant in Ani- 
mal Nutrition, effective May 1. 

C. -V Read, Assistant in Dairy Hus- 
bandry, effective April 1. 

P. P. Smith. Assist.mt in Plant Path- 
ology Extension, effective March 15. 

W. R. Young, Instructor in Engineer- 
ing Extension, effective March 10. 

N. E. Garber, County Agent in Bucks 
County, effective Feb. 15. 

X. S. Grubbs, County Agent .n Alle- 
gheny County, effective March 1. 

W. H. McNess, Assistant County 
Agent in Bradford County, effective 
April 10. 

Leave of Absenc e 

A. P. Honess, Assistant Professor oi' 
Mineralogy, for the first semester of 
the academic year beginning Septem- 
ber 1, 1922. He will continue study for 
the Docorate degree at Princeton Uni- 
versity. 

Zora Klain, Assistant Professor of 
German, for the academic year begin- 
ning September 1, 1922. He will take 
up studies in the School of Education 
at the University of Pennsylvania lead- 
ing to the Doctorate degree. 

R. D. Lewis, Instructor in Agronomy, 
for one year beginning September 15, 
1922. Mr. Lewis will take up work for 
the M. S. degree at Cornell. 

D. S. Mead, Instructor in English, for 
the academic year beginning Septem- 
ber 1, 1922. He goes to Princeton to 
earn the Doctorate degree. 

H. W. Shoenberger, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of English, for the academic 
year beginning September 1, 1922. He 
will study at the University of Penn- 
sylvania for the Ph.D. degree. 



Changes in Title 

A. L. Beam, from Associate Profes- 
sor of Dairy Husbandry to Associate 
Professor of Dairy Production. 

S. I. Beehde! from Professor of Dairy 
Husbandry to Professor of Dairy Pro- 
duction. 

A. W. Cowell from Professor of Land- 
wave Gardening to Professor of Land- 
scape Architecture. 

W. H. Martin from Instructor in 
Dairy Husbandry to Instructor in 
Dairy Manufacturing. 

It was voted to approve the transfer- 
al of W. H. Davis as Assistant in Dairy 
Husbandry Extension to rthe position 
of Assistant County Agent in Erie Coun- 
ty beginning March 13, 1922. 

New Appointments 

Arthur J. Wood as Head of the De- 
partment of Mechanical Engineering 
beginning September 1, 1922. 

D. L. Van Dine, Assistant Professor 
of Entomology Extension, for two years 
beginning May 15. 

Monroe J. Amies, Assistant in Farm 
Management Extension, from February 
G to June 15, and beginning this date, 
Assistant in Experimental Agronomy 
for one year. 

Gustav E. Cohen, Instructor in Cnem- 
istry, from March 1, 1922, to June 15. 

Charles A. Eder, Instructor in Civil 
Engineering, from March 1 to July 1. 

Charles E. Fox, Assistant in Co-op- 
eration and Rural Organization Exten- 
sion, for one year beginning April 1. 

LeRoy Hoffer, Assistant in Dairy 
Husbandry Extension, from February 
G to September G, 1922. 

Mrs. F. B. Lincoln, temporary Assist- 
ant in Home Economics Extension, 
from March 1 to July 1, 1922. 

Edith H. MacArthur, Instructor in 
Domestic Science, from February 1 to 
June 30, 1922. 

Julia G. Brill, Teaching Fellow in 
Latin, for one year beginning Septem- 
ber 1, 1922. 

Cordelia Pharo, Assistant in German, 
for one year beginning September 1, 
1922. 



PROFESSOR WOOD ATTENDS 

RESEARCH COUNCIL MEETING 

Twelve engineers were called togeth- 
er in New York on April 21 by the 
chairman of the engineering division 
of the National Research Council for 
the purpose of recommending stand- 
ards for use in the various problems 
of heat transmission. This conference, 
which will be made a permanent fea- 
ture of the Engineering Division of the 
National Research Council, aims to co- 
relate the various projects now being 
undertaken in research laboratories 
where the laws of heat through build- 
ing and insulating materials are being 
determined. The Engineering Experi- 
ment Station of this College has been 
taking a leading part in standardizing 
apparatus and methods in this subject| 
Professor Wood represented the Amer- 
ican Society of Mechanical Engineers 
at the conference. 



DEAN MOORE'S BOOK A SUCCESS 

The book on "Coal" by Dean Moore, 
just published, has been very well re- 
ceived by trade and educational peo- 
ple interested in the subject. The "Coal 
Review" of April 5 says: "While the 
Volume, on account of its thorough 
scientific treatment will make a strong) 
appeal as a book of ready reference tol 
the man who is concerned with the! 
technique of the industry, it is written: 
in such a readable and comprehensive 
form as to bring it within easy range 
of the general reader who desires to b« 
informed at large upon coal. Of par-| 
ticular note from the commercial anc'J 
trade standpoint are the chapters, with 
accompanying maps, on the distriibutioij 
of coal and the coal fields of the world.', 

"It is first rate and all around" ill 
the comment of Dr. Alfred C. Lane 
formerly state geologist in Michigan 
now at Tufts College, who is recognize' 
as the dean of present day geologists 
apparatus and methods in this subjeel 
have sent congratulatory messages rel 
ative to this book. 



Published every Tuesday 
during 1 the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



VOLUME I 



State College, Pa., May 2, 1922 



Contributions must toe as 
brief as possible, and reach 
D. M. Cresswell, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



NUMBER 27 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



PRESIDENT TO SPEAK 

TO THE COLLEGE STAFi 

President Thomas has announced 
that tonight (Tuesday) at 7:30 in the 
Old Chapel, he will be pleased to meet 
all members of the teaching and ad- 
ministrative staffs of the college, in or- 
der to report to them concerning pub- 
lic activities of the administrative of- 
ficers during recent months and to pre- 
sent the plans which have been outlin- 
ed for the promotion of the institution, 
©specially with reference to the build- 
ing fund campaign. The President will 
be pleased with a full attendance and 
will be glad to have any bring their 
wives and friends. The meeting is call- 
ed purely to give information on pro- 
gress and plans. 

o 

NEW SENATE REGULATIONS 

On April 27 the College Senate en- 
acted the following regulations: 
.Resident Work for Graduation 

A candidate for the bachelor's degree 
in any course in this college shall pur- 
sue not less than thirty credits of the 
required work in residence, which shall 
be approved by the Head of the Depart- 
ment concerned. The time spent in 
residence shall be not less than two se- 
mesters, or four summer sessions aggre- 
gating a minimum of thirty-two weeks, 
immediately preceding graduation. 

Any previous legislation of the Col- 
lege Senate or of the General Faculty 
conflicting with this action is hereby 
revoked. 

"Scholarship Day" 

"Scholarship Day" shall be establish- 
ed at or about the middle of each se- 
mester, at which time the elections to 
the various honor societies shall be an- 
nounced. The Committee on Academic 
Standards shall be empowered to con- 
sult the representatives of the various 
honor societies in order to decide upon 
definite dates that would be satisfac- 
tory to all parties concerned. 
Maximum Grade of 60 for Reexamina- 
tion 

Students who may remove conditions 
by taking re-examinations shall receive 
a maximum grade of 60%. It is rec- 
ommended that the re-examination in 
any subject be more comprehensive 
than the examination given at the end 
of the semester so as to more thorough- 
ly test the student's knowledge of the 
work covered by the course. 
"Follow -up Courses" 

A "follow up course" may be sched- 
uled for students who received a grade 
of "E" in any subject under the fol- 
lowing conditions: 

1. The course shall be authorized by 
the Courses of Study Committee and 
ratified by the College Senate. 

2. The course shall be placed on the 
student's schedule and shall be regu- 



larly scheduled for the prescribed num- 
ber of recitations or practicum hours. 

3. Students who have received a "D" 
grade in any subject in which a "fol- 
low up course" is organized may, if they 
choose and with the approval of their 
scheduling officer, enter the "follow up 
course" instead of taking the re-exami- 
nation. 

4. Any student entering such a 
course shall pay into the college treas- 
ury a special fee of Five Dollars ($5.00) 
per credit. The fees so obtained shall 
constitute a special fund and shall be 
used to pay for the additional instruc- 
tion when necessary. 

5. A "follow up course" is defined 
as a class formed in any subject dur- 
ing the semester or summer session in 
which the subject is not regularly 
scheduled for any curriculum of the 
college. 

o 

RECENT COUNCIL ACTIONS 
"Daylight Saving" Ends May 28 
The Council has voted that "the Col- 
lege return to Standard time on Sun- 
day, May 28 (instead of October 1)." 

Committee on Discipline 

By vote of the Council all questions 
of discipline shall henceforth be deter- 
mined by a committee consisting of the 
President of the College, the Dean of 
the School to which the student con- 
cerned belongs, and the Dean of Men 
(if the student concerned is a man) or 
the Dean of Women (if the student 
concerned is a woman) ; and that this 
committee may call in others whose 
presence would be of assistance in ren- 
dering a decision. 

Sesqui- Centennial Committee 

President Thomas has announced the 
appointment of the following commit- 
tee, relative to participation by the Col- 
lege in the Sesqui-Centennial celebra- 
tion in Philadelphia: Professors F. P. 
Weaver (Chairman), C. L. Kinsloe, D. 
A. Anderson, D. F. McFarland,, Dean 
C. W. Stoddart, and Miss Pearl Mac- 
Donald. 



CALENDAR 



ii 



STUDENTS 1 ! 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 
Jun.or 
Richardson. Edward Garrett, CF. 

Freshman 
Barclay, John Marshall, CF 
Ewing, Edward Leaf, CE. 
Fielder, Walter, DH. 
Mechling, O. Judd, Mng. 
Morris, John Elliott, Mng. 

President Thomas, Director Bezdek 
and E. K. Hibshman will attend the 
alumni gathering to be held at Allen- 
town on Friday night. The President 
will speak at the Union Theological 
Seminary and at Columbia University 
on Sunday. 



TUESDAY, May 2 
7:30 p. m. — President Thomas speaka 
to college staff, Old Chapel. 

7:3U p. m. — Mass meeting and sing. 
Auditorium. 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 3 
7:30 p.m. — Orchestra concert, Audi- 
torium. 

THURSDAY, May 4 
Cattle Feeders' Day will be observ- 
ed uii Ag. Hill. Laying of cornerstone 
of new beef cattle barn, after lunch. 
FRIDAY, May 5 
Spring meeting of Central Pennsyl- 
vania branch of A. S. M. E. 

Dean Cooley, 3 : 30, Auditorium. 
Baseball with Bethany. 

SATURDAY, May G 
Track meet with U. of Virginia. 
1 .as. ball with Bethany. Also, Fresh- 
men vs. Beliefonte Academy. 
SUNDAY, May 7 
Chapel Speaker — Bishop Edwin H. 
Hughes, of Maiden, Mass. 

7:30 p. m. — Combined musical ser- 
vices of all the Churches, Auditorium. 

RESEARCH 

The Senate Committee on Research 
has sent to all members of the teaching 
faculty and experiment station staff, 
blank forms to be filled out in connec- 
tion with a research survey of the Col- 
lege. All are requested to give this mat- 
ter prompt consideration (before May 
10) and to cooperate in a thorough 
manner with the Research Committee 
in this attempt to get at the real sit- 
uation regarding research work at the 
college. After blanks are filled out 
they should be handed to the head of 
the department who will in turn send 
them to the Dean of the School. Extra 
"problem" blanks may be secured from 
heads of departments or from members 
of the Committee. 



o 

LECTURE BY DEAN COOLEY 

Dean Mortimer E. Cooley, of the 
University of Michigan, will speak in 
the Auditorium at 3:30, Friday, May 
5th, on "Engineering in its Broader 
Aspects". 

Dean Cooley is the head of the larg- 
est engineering school in this country. 
He is a parst president of the American 
Society of Mechanical Engineers and 
has just succeeded Herbert Hoover as 
president of the Federated American 
Engineering Societies, which organiza- 
tion represents more than 50,000 mem- 
bers of the important national engi- 
neering societies. 



The reception to U. S. Senator George 
Wharton Pepper will be held in the 
auditorium at 7:30 p. m. May 10. Fur- 
ther announcement will be made in 
next week's Bulletin. 



!' a : V BLP6. 



Published every Tuesday 
I during the college year as a 

means of making official an- 
:■ nouncements and presenting 

items of interest to the facul- 
fty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 



Contributions must oe as 
brief as possible, and reach 
D. M. Cresswell, Bulletin Edi- 
tor. 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME I 



State College, Pa., May 9, 1922 



NUMBER 28 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

RECENT COUNCIL ACTIONS 
Committee oil Public Appointments 

By a vote of the Council an adminis- 
trative committee of three, one of whom 
shall be the Superintendent of Grounds 
and Buildings, shall have general su- 
pervision of all Commencement exer- 
cises, arrange all necessary details for 
Commencement (except devising the 
program), and make these details pub- 
lic to instructors and candidates for 
degrees. This committee shall aljo 
take charge of the arrangements for 
any public occasion that the Council of 
Administrative may assign to it. This 
committee shall not contract for the 
expenditure of any money without th ■• 
consent of the Comptroller. To serve 
on this committee the chair appointed 
Professors J. H. Olevvine (Chairman), 
R. B. Nesbitt and R. I. Webber (as Su- 
i perintendent of Grounds and Buildings 
with the cooperation of the Purchasing 
i Agent). 

Publicity Committee 
At the request of the Department of 
Publicity the Council voted that the 
following committee be appointed to co- 
j operate with this department in the 
I consideration of new or helpful policies 
land to assist generally in its develop- 
ment. Messrs. R. H. Smith (Chairman), 
I E. K. Hibshman and E. N. Sullivan. 
Memorial Day Committee 
By vote of the Council of Administra- 
tion the following committee has been 
appointed to devise a suitable program 
for public exercises on Memorial Day. 
in consultation with President Thomas 
and a representative of the local post 
of the American Legion: Professors E. 
D. Wialker (Chairman), W. S. Dye and 
F. D. Kern. 



DEANS OF WOMEN TO MEET 
The first annual meeting of the Penn- 
sylvania Association of Deans of Wo- 
! men will be held here on Friday and 
Saturday of this week, the opening ses- 
sion being scheduled for the Foyer 
:of the Auditorium at 7:30 Friday even- 
ing. President Thomas will make a 
■ short address of welcome to the visit- 
ing deans after which a short business 
session will be held. This will be fol- 
lowed by a reception at the Women's 
.Building where entertainment will be 
[provided by the Penn State Players. 

Business sessions will be held on Sat- 
jurday morning followed by luncheon 
|at McAllister Hall at 12:30. 

-o 

MEETING FOR FACULTY 
Dr. C. E. Seashore, Dean of the Grad- 
uate School, University of Iowa, will 
speak to the entire faculty on Friday 
evening, May 12th, at seven o'clock in 
31d Chapel. President Thomas is es- 
pecially anxious to have all members 
oi the faculty present in order to hear 
Dean Seashore speak on some topic 
concerned with the development of 
graduate study in which he has been 
peculiarly successful. 



CALENDAR 



TUESDAY, May <J 

Chi.' Honor Society Council will meet 
at 7:00 p. m. in Dean Warnock's office. 
WEDNESDAY, May 10 

Regular meeting of the faculty of 
i e Liberal Arts Sihool will be held at 
Ir.'iO p. m. in room 25, Liberal Arts 
Building. — L. V. T. Simmons, Secretary. 

Senator Pepper will speak in the Aud- 
itorium at 7:30. This will be followed 
by a reception at the University Club. 

FRIDAY, May 12 

Dean Seashore of University of 
Iowa, will talk to the faculty concern- 
in-; graduate study. Old Chapel, 7:00 

Opening session of Deans of Women 
Conference, Foyer of Auditorium at 
7:30, followed by a reception at the 
Women's Building. 

SATURDAY, May 13 

Interscholastie Track Meet — Prelim- 
inaries 10:00; finals 2:30. 

Lacrosse — Penn State vs. Syracuse. 
New Beaver, 1:30. 

Track — Penn State Freshmen vs. Pitt 
Freshmen, 2:30. 

Baseball — Penn State Freshmen vs. 
Shadyside Academy, 4:00. 

SUNDAY, May 11 

Chapel Speaker — Bishop W. F. Mc- 
Dowell, of Washington, D. C. 

FACULTY MEMBERS 

ASSIST IN CAMPAIGN 
In order to obtain a complete working 
organization of the Penn State alumni 
clubs throughout the state and coun- 
try, a number of "organizers" have been 
appointed and are already obtaining 
results. George R. Green of the fores- 
try department, J. Orvis Keller of the 
industrial engineering department, and 
F. P. Weaver of the agricultural ex- 
tension department are giving part of 
their time to the endeavor, helping 
Alumni Secretary E. N. Sullivan in the 
field. G. H. Bedell, '15, of Harrisburg, 
is also assisting with this work. Last 
week the following counties were cov- 
ered by these men: Bedell in Hunt- 
ingdon; Keller in Tioga; Green in Clear- 
field; Weaver in Centre and Sullivan 
in Chester. This week Sullivan will be 
in Bucks; Bedell in Mifflin; Keller in 
Potter and Green in Jefferson. 



A. A. A. S. DINNER MEETING 

The second annual meeting of the lo- 
cal branch of the American Association 
for the Advancement of Science will be 
a dinner meeting to be held Thursday 
evening at 6:00 p. m. May 11, in the 
Women's Building. The speaker will 
be Dr. C. E. Seashore, Dean of the 
Graduate School of the University of 
Iowa and Chairman of the Committee 
on Anthropology and Psychology of 
the National Research Council. Those 
expecting to attend should notify Miss 
iOhace at her office in the Women's 
Building not later than this afternoon. 
The price will be $1.00 per plate. 



BUILDING FUND CAMPAIGN 

IS IN CAPABLE HANDS 

The job of getting the $2,000,000 
building fund campaign under way is 
an immense one, and every day is a 
busy day at the headquarters office in 
the new location of the President's of- 
fice on the second floor of Old Main. 
There President Thomas is the direc- 
tor general of affairs in the mass of 
preparation to be made for the launch- 
ing of the actual campaign in the Fall. 

As announced by President Thomas 
at the college staff meeting last Tues- 
day, the general organization of the 
campaign has been placed in the hands 
of The John Price Jones Corporation, 
organization and publicity specialists, 
of New York City. They have submii - 
ted thorough plans for procedure in the 
campaign and will see it through to 
completion. Parke F. Hanley repre- 
sents the New York firm in the organi- 
zation and Burr Price in publicity. They 
are located with Mr. Hibshman at the 
President's office. 

The John Price Jones Corporation 
has assisted successfully in more than 
twenty major fund and publicity cam- 
paigns in the last three years. Among 
i he many college and university en- 
dowment drives they have supervised 
are the following: Harvard Univer- 
sity, Smith College, Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, Wellesley College, Simmons Col- 
lege. Ohio State University, Mt. Holy- 
oke College, Hill School, Hotchkiss 
School, and a drive is now on at Tufts 
College. 

They are also in charge of the Wood- 
row Wilson Foundation drive, and have 
assisted with raising funds and giving 
publicity to the China Famine Relief, 
Stable Money League, America's Gift 
to France (the Marne statue) and the 
General Foch tour. They were called 
to help with the Unitarian.. Church 
drive, the United Hospitals, and organ- 
ized the fund campaigns for the Lying- 
in Hospital, the Post Graduate Hospi- 
tal, the Broad Street Hospital and the 
Roosevelt Hospital, all in New York 
City. 



-o- 



SENATOR PEPPER 

HERE TOMORROW 

Senator George Wharton Pepper will 
be in State College tomorrow and will 
speak in the Auditorium at seven-thir- 
ty o'clock. He will be introduced by 
President Thomas and will also be ac- 
companied by John F. Shields, of the 
Executive Committee of the Board of 
Trustees. The band will be on hand 
for the meeting. Arrangements have 
been made to hold an informal recep- 
tion for Senator Pepper at the Univer- 
sity Club immediately following the 
meeting. 



Department heads are asked to noti- 
fy the Bulletin Editor of changes, res- 
ignations or appointments, that will af- 
fect the Bulletin mailing list. 



Q-ru 



nr 



For a list of examinations by ap- 
pointment, see Collegian for May 9. 
SCHEDULED EXAMINATIONS 

Monday, 8:30 A. M., May 29 (Seniors) 

A. H. 9, 105 Hort. 
Com. IT, Amp. 
D. H. 7, 105 Hort. 

D. Sci. 32, 201 Mng. A. 

E. E. 15, 19, 200 Eng. D. 
Engl. 20, Amp. 

Hist. 26, Amp. 
Hort, IS, 106 Hort. 
Monday, 1:30 P. M„ May 20 (Seniors) 
Ag. Ed. 12, 202 Hort. 
Chem. 466, 490. Amp. 
Ed. 10, 202 Hort. 
Eng. Law 3, Amp. 
Wednesday, 8:30 A. M., May 31 (Seniors) 

D. H. IS. 104, 105 Hort. 
Econ. 23, 202 Hort. 

E. E. 6, 200 Eng. D. 
Geol. VI, 104, 119 Mng. A. 
H. Econ. 27, W. B. 

I. E. 70S, 200 Eng. D. 

.Met. 75, 79. 10, 12, C. A. 

Mng. S3, 104 Mng. A. 
Wednesday, 1:30 P, >L, May 31 (Seniors) 

A. H. 21, 104 Hort. 

Chem. Ag. 36, 105 Hort. 

Ht. Eng. 31, 51, 207 Eng. C, 205, 207 
Eng. A. 

Hyd. 12, 200 Eng. D. 

Mng. SI, 200 Mng. A. 
Thursday, 8:30 A. M., June 1 (Seniors) 

Ag. Ed. 14, 100 Hort. 

A. H. 25, 100 Hort. 

Com. 24, 100 Hort. 

E. E. 10, 11, 200 Eng. D. 

Geol. S2, 104 Mng. A. 

M. Des. 5S, 59, 200 Eng. D. 

Met. 77, 104 Mng. A. 
Thursday, 1:30 P. M„ June 1 (Seniors 
and others) 

Agro. 30, 200 Ag. 

Com. 60, Amp. 

Dom. Sei. 7, 52, 304, 315. 316 Main. 

Ed. 4, 22, 302, 320, 321 Main. 

For. 74, For. 

Hist. 21, Amp. 

Hort. 201, 232, 103 Ag., 105, 100. 202 
Hort. 

Mens. 3, 300 Eng. A., 300 Eng. C, 23 
Eng. F. 

Mng. 55, 101 Mng. A. 

Pol. Sci. 13, 100, 200 Hort., L. A. 
Friday, «:30 A. M., June 2 (Seniors and 
others) 

Bot. 22, 100, 105, 200 Hort. 

Chem. 128, 445, Amp., C. A., 206, 219, 
226, 302, 304, 311. 320, 321, 437, 438 Main. 

Chem. Ag. 27, 103 Ag. 

Dom. Sci. 46. 315 Main. 

Econ. 22, 19, 20, 22, 25, 28 L. A. 

Engl. 352, 314 Main. 

Geol. 52. mi Mng. A. 

1. Art 75, 270 Main. 

I. E. 605, 709, 808, 200 Eng. D. 

Mens. 1, 300 Eng. A., 300 Eng. C, 23 
Eng. F. 

Mi i. 63, Hit, 200 Mng. A. 

I'. II. 202, 206 Ag. 

Psy. 13, 14 L. A. 
Friday, 1:30 1'. M., June 2 (Seniors and 
others) 

'''■in. I.",. A.mp. 

I). II. 2 10, 213, 259 Dairy, 206 Ag. 
i Scl. 42, 13, 314 Main. 



Econ. 2, 100, 200 Hort. 

Ed. 6, 22 L. A. 

E. E. 4. 200 Eng. D. 

Hist. 25, Amp. 

Ht. Eng. 36, 101, 104 Mng. A. 

Hwy. 1, 200, 206 Eng. E. 

Hyd. 1, 201, 203, 205, 207 Eng. A., 
207. 20S. 209. 210 Eng. C. 

I. A. 74, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 25, 2S L. A. 

Main. 10-11, 12, 13 L. A. 

Psy. 21, 315, 316 Main. 

Rur. Soc. 1, 105, 106, 202 Hort. 

Soc. 5, 100 Hort. 
Saturday, 8:30 A. M., June 3 (Seniors 
and others) 

Agro. 6, 26. 251, 259 Dairy, 103, 206 
Ag. 

A. H. 5. 106 Hort. 

Bact. 3, 105 Hort. 

Bot. 6, 104 Hort. 

Chem. 133-34, 143-44, 265-66, Amp., C. 
A. 

Coin. 30. 100 Hort. 

D. H. 11, 202 Hort. 

Dr. 5S, 206, 300 Eng. A., 300 Eng. C, 
0l Eng. E., 23 Eng. F. 

D. Sci. 4S. 314 Main. 

Econ. 14, 200 Eng. D., 1-6, 14, 25. 28 
L. A. 

Ed. 25, 315. 310 Main. 

E. E. 13, 202, 213 Eng. D. 
Engl 458, 304. 306 Main. 
Hisi. 2, 100 Hort. 

Hort. 32, 200 Hort. 

Met. 58, 74, 104 Mng. A. 
Saturiay, 1:30 P. M., June 3 (Ssniors 
and others) 

Agro. 13, 229. 103, 206 Ag. 

Bot. 210, Ami>. 

Ed. 2. 14. 25, 28 L. A. 

E. E. 9, 200 Eng. D, 201, 203, 205. 
207 Eng. A. 

For. 2S, For. 

Geol. 48, 101 Mng. A. 

Math. 11. Main Bldg. 

M. Des. 50, 209. 210 Eng. C. 

Phil. 20. 100 Hort. 

Pol. Sci. 16. 20 L. A. 

Psy. 2, 14, 1-8. 11 L. A. 

Zool. 365. 371, Amp. 
Monday, 8:30 A. M., June 5 (AH except 
Seniors) 

Agro. 2, 206 Ag. 

A. H, 203, 103 Ag. 

Chem. 245, 10 C. A. 

Com. 41. 1-5 L. A. 

E. E. 2. 200. 202, 213 Eng. D. 

Engl. 12, 13, 15, 17, 200, 250, 302, 322, 
452, Amp., 100 Hort., 28 Phys., 4 McA. 
H. Main Bldg. 

H. Eco. 24, 14 L. A. 

Ht. Eng. 17, 201, 203, 205, 207 Eng. 
A., 201 Eng. C. 

Zool. 366. 3 McA. H. 
M inday, 1:30 P. M., June 5 (All except 
Seniors) 

Agro. 213, 202 Hort. 

Engl. 5, Amp. 100 Hort., 200 Eng. D., 
4 McA. H, Main Bldg. 

Hort. 203, 105 Hort. 

Ht. Eng. 4, 201, 207 Eng. C. 

AI. Des. 56, 209, 210 Eng. C. 
Tuesday, K:30 A. M„ June 6 (AH except 
Seniors) 

A. H. 8, 103 Ag. 

Chem. 353-54, 10, 11, 12 C. A. 

Ech. E. 4. 200 Eng. D. 

Fr. 24, 241, 100, 106 Hort 



Ger. 4, 25, 28 L. A. 

Hort. 3, 7, 206 Ag. 

Hyd. 2, 201, 203 Eng. A. 

I. E. 705, 201, 207 Eng. C. 

Sp. 24, 26. 241, Amp. 

Zool. 375, 4 McA. H. 
Tuesday, 1:S0 P. M., June 6 (AH except 
Seniors) 

Agro. 211, 104, 105 Hort. 

A. H. 209. 211, 100 Hort. 

D. H. 4, 16. 251, 259 Dairy, 103, 206 
Ag. 

For. 57, For. 

Fr. 12, 14. Ami)., C. A. 

Geol. 67. 101 Mng. A. 

Ger 2, 14. 25, 28 L. A. 

L. G. 1, 202 Hort. 

Mng. 59. 200 Mng. A. 

Sp. 12, 14, Main. 

eduesday, 8:i;0 X. M„ June 7 (All ex- 
cept Seniors) 

Chem. Ag. 209, 206 Ag. 

Ech. E.l, 213 Eng. D. 

For. 35, For. 

Geog. 11, 101, 200 Mng. A. 

! fort. 21S, 202 Hort. 

T E. 201. 402. 205, 207 Eng. A., 201, 
207, 20S, 209, 210 Eng. C. 

Math. 6, L. A. 

M. Des. 31, 200 Eng. D. 

Met. 57, 61, 104 Mng. A. 

Phys. 267, 281, 351, 353, 355, Amp. 

Str. 30, 201, 203 Eng. A. 

Zool. 153, 4 McA. H. 
dn-sday, 1:30 P. M., June 7 (All ex- 
cept Seniors) 

Agro. 11, 27, 103, 206 Ag. 

Chem. Ag. 1, 100, 202 Hort. 

Dom. Art 40, 41, 315, 316 Main. 

For. 49, 72, For. 

Ht Eng. 6, 11, 200 Eng. D., 201, 203, 
205, 207 Eng. C. 

Pol. Sci. 2, Amp. 

Pair. Soc. 201, 105, 106, 200 Hort. 
Thurslay, 8:30 A, M„ June 8 (AH ex- 
cept Senious) 

A. H. 22, 200 Hort. 

Dom. Art 20, '27, 315 Main. 

For. 37, For. 

Geol. 58. 104 Mng. A. 

L. G. 8, 208, 105 Hort. 

Met. 5 5, 104 Mng. A. 

Min. 32 52, 104, 200 Mng. A . 

Mng. 53, 101 Mng. A. 

P. H. 201, 100 Hort. 

Phys. 261, Amp. 

R R. 3, 20i: 203 Eng. A. 
Thursday, 1:30 P M, June 8 (All ex 
cept Seniors) 

Agro. 202, 202 Hort. 

A. H. 205, 212, 105, 106, 200 Hort. 

Bot. 2, Amip. 

D. H. 12, 259 Dairy. 

Hort. 1, 100 Hort., 103, 206 Ag. 

Math. 7, Main Bldg. 

sur. 17, 201, 203 Eng. A. 
Friday, 8:30 A. M„ June 9 (AH except 
Seniors) 

A. E. 21, 23 Eng. F. 

A. H. 4, 202 Hort. 

Chem. 153, 237-40, 258-86, 319-20, Amp 

Chem. Ag. 17, 20, 200 Hort. 

For. 220, For. 

Hort. 207, 105 Hort. 

Math. 5, 28 L. A. 

Min. 64, 101 Mng. A. 

Zool. 151, 4 McA. H. 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 



Contributions must toe aa 
brief as possible, and reach 
D. M. Cresswell, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME I 



State College, Pa., May 16, 1922 



NUMBER 29 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

COLLEGE SENATE 
The regular May meeting- of the Col- 
lege Senate will be held on Thursday 
evening-, May 18, at 7:30 in the Foyer 
of the Auditorium. 

— — o 

COUNCIL ACTION 

The Council of Administration has 
voted that all college classes be dis- 
missed on the last hour on Thursday 
forenoon, May 18, in order that students 
may attend group meetings to be held 
in the interest of the campaign for a 
college building fund and a larger Penn 
State. 

— — o ■ 

TO ALL FACULTY MEMBERS— 
May I ask all instructors on Tuesday 
and Wednesday mornings, May 16 and 
17, to urge upon all students in their 
classes, the importance of a full attend- 
ance at the various group mass meet- 
ings to be held instead of regular 
classes at the last hour on Thursday 
forenoon, May 18, in the interest of the 
Emergency Building Fund Campaign? 

Please assure the students that no 
pledges will be asked for cr received at 
these meetings. 

JOHN M. THOMAS, President. 

CHANGES IN EXAM SCHEDULE 

The attention of all members of the 
teaching staff is called to the fact that 
they are not at liberty to change the 
time or the place of any regularly sched- 
uled examination without the knowledge 
and consent of the Assistant Registrar. 
JOHN M. THOMAS, President. 



SENIOR GRADES 



The graduating class this year is un- 
usually large, numbering about 545 Sen- 
iors. Consequently instructors who 
teach Seniors are earnestly requested 
to report Senior grades to the Regis- 
trar at the earliest possible moment. 
To avoid mistakes, the revised Senior 
list in the new college catalogue, just 
issued, should be consulted. Grades of 
Seniors should be placed on a separ- 
ate sheet, and should be plainly marked 
"Senior grades." Seniors who pursue 
studies in classes consisting mainly of 
Juniors, Sophomores or Frerhmen 
should, if necessary, be given a special 
examination in order that their grades 
may be placed in the Registrar's hands 
not later than 4:30 p. m., Wednesday, 
June 7. 

A. H. ESPENSHADE, Registrar. 



NEW COLLEGE CATALOGUE 

The new general catalogue of the 
college has just been issued. Members 
of the teaching and administrative 
staffs who have not yet received a 
copy can obtain one by calling at the 
Registrar's office. 



CALENDAR 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 
Senior 
Lannon, John Vincent, ME. 

Juniors 
Clark, Frank S., BE. 
Kenney, William Bannon, Met. 

Freshman 
Mast, John Carroll, EE. 

Special 
Garrett, Benjamin Gordon, IE. 

ANNOUNCE APPOINTMENT 

OF BUILDING INSPECTOR 

The staff of the Department of 
Grounds and Buildings has been in- 
creased by the appointment of an In- 
spector of Buildings. He will have di- 
rect oversight over the janitorial force 
and their daily maintenance work. He 
will endeavor to improve the cleanliness 
of the buildings through this supervi- 
sion and by, at times of necessity, shift- 
ing men temporarily to lend assistance 
where help is needed. He will make 
observations concerning the physical 
conditions in and surrounding the 
buildings and report thereon for cor- 
rections whore correction is possible. 

The Inspector will keep in touch with 
the Deans and Heads of Departments 
occupying buildings regarding this work, 
and if the work is not done satisfac- 
torily the Inspector has full power to 
make necessary corrections. 

The Inspector will have charge of the 
fire fighting equipment in the build- 
ings and of the hose and chemical ap- 
paratus. It is intended that a fire 
fighting- brigade be organized among 
the College employees and students 
with the Inspector of Buildings as chief. 

It is hoped that the Deans and Heads 
of Departments will lend all aid possi- 
ble by suggestions to and consultation 
with the Inspector, and, if the work 
proves unsatisfaetury, make written sug- 
gestions to the Superintendent of 
Grounds and Buildings. 

Mr. Alvin Way has been appointed 
Inspector of Buildings and will under- 
take this work immediately. He will 
call upon the Deans and Heads of De- 
partments as soon as possible so as to 
come to a clear understanding regard- 
ing the details of the work to be done 
in the various buildings. 



The College Library desires copies 
of the Penn State Farmer as follows: 
Vol. 12, No. 1, February, 1919; and 
Vol. 13, No. 9, June, 1920. 



WEDNESDAY, May 17 

Opening session of seventh annual 
engineering extension convention at 
seven-thirty o'clock in room 200, En- 
gineering D. Continues Thursday, Fri- 
day and Saturday. 

Baseball, Penn State vs. Pittsburgh 
Collegians, New Beaver Field, 4:00. 
THURSDAY, May 18 

College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Audi- 
torium. 

Industrial conference at School of 
Engineering in room 200, Engineering 
D, at 4:00. Continues Friday. Banquet 
with extension convention at Univer- 
sity Club at 7:30. 

FRIDAY, May 19 

"The Seven Singing Seamen", under 
direction of Miss Sparks, Auditorium, 
8 : 30. Also Saturday evening. 
SATURDAY, May 20 

Baseball, Penn State vs. Carnegie 
Tech, at 2:30, followed by Freshman 
g-ame with the Pitt Freshmen. 

Mass meeting for visiting Fathers in 
Auditorium at 7:00, followed by a smok- 
er in the Armory. Faculty members 
are especially invited to attend and 
meet the Fathers. 

Musical entertainment at the Uni- 
versity Club for club members, wives 
and partners at 8:15. Messrs. Her- 
mann, Holben and Putney, assisted by 
Mrs. Holben. 

SUNDAY, May 21 

No Chapel speaker. Music by the 
College Chorus. 

ANNOUNCEMENT 

Until further notice the Faculty Bul- 
letin will be edited by George W. Sul- 
livan, assistant director of publicity. 
Address all Bulletin matter to him at 
175 Old Main. 

Mr. Cresswell is now on campaign 
publicity duty and can be located at 
the Campaign Headquarters, second 
floor of Old Main. 



ii 



THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION 

OF UNIVERSITY PROFESSORS 
The local chapter of the American 
Association of University Professors 
will hold a meeting on Monday, May 
22, at 7:30 p. m., in room 201 Engineer- 
ing A. The program committee has ar- 
ranged for a discussion of the topic, 
"The Direction of Education." 

o 

The annual May Day celebration of 
the college girls will take place on 
Wednesday. May 24th, at 4:30 in front 
of the Women's Building. 

_ o 

Dr. Stecker represented the depart- 
ment of mathematics recently at the 
twenty-fifth anniversary of the found- 
ing of the University of Chicago sec- 
tion of the American Mathematical So- 
ciety. 



P , CROCKETT o 

3 K k I N B L H C7 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



vania S 



oiiege 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME I 



State College, Pa., May 23, 1922 



NUMBER 30 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



ANNUAL MILITARY REVIEW 
The Council of Administration has 
voted that the last two hours of the 
forenoon of Thursday, June 1, be devot- 
ed to the annual final review and mili- 
tary exercises of the college regiment, 
and that during these two hours all 
regular college exercises be suspended. 
■ — o — 

COLLEGE COAL SUPPLY 

MUST BE CONSERVED 

The College has only about 500 tons 
of coal left and it is next to impossible 
to get any coal now. It will be neces- 
sary, therefore, to cut the daily con- 
sumption to a minimum. 

Every member of the instructional 
staff and other employees of the college 
are urged to reduce their lighting re- 
quirements to a minimum between the 
hours of 9:00 a. m., and 5:00 p. m., 
when the greatest power loads are re- 
quired. The electrical load between 
5:00 p. m. and 9:00 a. m. is of less con- 
sequence. 

°— / 

SET YOUR CLOCK BACK 

By action of the Council of Adminis- 
tration, daylight saving will come to an 
end at 12 : 01 o'clock Sunday morning, 
May 28th. Before retiring next Satur- 
day night, don't forget to set your 
watch and clock back one hour in order 
to regain the hour of sleep lost on April 
30th. 

MAY DAY CELEBRATION 
The college girls will hold their an- 
nual May Day Celebration tomorrow 
afternoon at 4:30 in front of the Wom- 
en's Building. The program will last 
for about an hour and will include May 
Pole Dances, the Crowning of the May 
Queen, numbers by the Girls' Glee 
Club, and the Penn State Players. All 
those interested are invited to attend. 
In case of rain, the celebration will be 
postponed to Thursday. 

o — — 

The Publicity Department can make 
use of notations from academic depart- 
ment heads, telling of positions secured 
by those who will be graduated in June. 
They can be .sent at any time, but as 
complete a list as possible will be de- 
sired within the next week or ten days. 



MEMORIAL DAY PLANS 
All regular college exercises will be 
suspended next Tuesday, Memorial Day, 
by action of the College Senate, and 
the day will be observed as a holiday. 
A patriotic program has been arranged 
for the morning by a committee ap- 
pointed by the Council of Administra- 
tion, composed of Professors Walker, 
Dye and Kern, acting in conjunction 
with the American Legion. 

A parade will be organized at 10:00 a. 
in. with Lieutenant-Colonel Comly as 
Marshall, and will follow the usual 
route. Immediately after the parade, a 
short ceremony and salute will take 
place at Dr. Atherton's grave At 11:00, 
the meeting on the Front Campus will 
begin with President Thomas as pre- 
siding officer. A feature of this pro- 
gram will be the presentation to the 
College of a Memorial Tablet bearing 
the named of the 73 Penn State men 
who gave their lives in the world war. 
Vhe presentation will be made by L. 
M. Sterner, '23, a rehabilitation stu- 
dent, and the tablet will be accepted 
and dedicated by Dr. Sparks. General 
E. C. Shannon, of the Pennsylvania Na- 
tional Guard will then give the Memor- 
ial Day address. 

o 



CALENDAR 



/ 



PRESIDENT S OFFICE MOVED 
When Old Main building was com- 
pleted in 1863, the room on the south- 
west corner of the first floor was re- 
served as a private laboratory and of- 
fice for President Pugh. Until re- 
cently that room has been the office 
of Penn State Presidents, ten in num- 
ber, but the President's Office is now 
located on the second floor of Old Main, 
immediately over the front entrance, 
in room 228. The offices of Mr. Hib- 
shman, Mr. Smith and Mr. Murtorl'f 
are in this new suite. Mr. H6stetter and 
Mr. Webber are now on the second 
floor in the eastern end of the building. 



FACULTY MEMBERS HONORED 

Spring elections to the local chapter 
of Phi Kappa Phi include the names of 
two members of the faculty. They are 
Dr. A. E. Martin, professor of Ameri- 
can History, and Dr. D. F. McFarland, 
professor of metallurgy. Twenty-six 
men and women students were elected 
to Phi Kappa Phi this spring. 



WEDNESDAY, May 21 
May Day Celebration by college girls, 
at 4:30, on lawn in front of Women's 
Building. 

THURSDAY, May 25 

Agricultural research conference be- 
gins. Continues Friday. 

FRIDAY, May 26 

Final Ladies' Night of the year at 
the University Club. This party will be 
formal. Music by Griffith's Orchestra. 
Make reservations with Mr. Clayton on 
or before Wednesday, May 24. 

Baseball — Penn State Freshmen vs. 
Wyoming Seminary. New Beaver, 4:30. 
SATURDAY, May 27 

Tennis — Penn State vs. Bucknell. 

Golf — Penn State vs. Penn. 

Lacrosse — Penn State vs. Swarth- 
more. 

Baseball — Penn State Freshmen vs. 
Kiski. 

SUNDAY, May 28 

Chapel Speaker — President E. D. 
Warfield, of Wilson College, Chambers- 
burg, Pa. 

MONDAY, May 29 

Domestic Art Exhibit, Women's 
Building, 7:00. 

TUESDAY, May 30 

Memorial Day. All regular College 
exercises suspended for the day. 



DOMESTIC ART EXHIBIT 

The annual Domestic Art Exhibit will 
take place next Monday, May 29th, at 
seven o'clock, in the Women's Building, 
when frocks and hats made by students 
in the clothing and millinery classes 
will be displayed. Youngsters wearing 
suits made by students in the class for 
children's clothing will appear first, 
followed by students wearing dresses 
made by themselves. An exhibition of 
posters made by students of the classes 
in Household Chemistry will also be 
held at the Women's Building on next 
Monday. 

o ■ 

Dr. I. L. Foster announces the publi- 
cation by Ginn & Co., of the Aldrich, 
Foster and Roule Elementary French 
Grammar (Revised). The book is just 
off the press. 



:■ : 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty 



he Pennsylvania State College 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME I 



State College, Pa., May 30, 1922 



NUMBER 31 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

COUNCIL ACTION 

The Council of Administration has 
recently formulated and adopted a uni- 
form mode of procedure in dealing with 
the separation of students from college 
f r any reason whatsoever. The Coun- 
cil has authority to deal with matters 
of discipline and to give or withhold 
final approval of the recommendation 
of a School for the dropping of a stu- 
dent for unsatisfactory scholarship. For 
administrative purposes, the Council 
^elegatej this authority to a committee 
consisting of the President of the Col- 
lege, the Dean of the School to which 
the student belongs, and the Dean of 
Men (or the Dean of Women if the 
student concerned is a woman). The 
Council, however, reserves the right to 
grant or withhold approval of the re- 
commendation of this committee. 

Letter of suspension or dismissal shall 
be sent out to students and parents by 
"the Secretary of the Council, signed as 
such. The Registrar of the College 
shall make a record .of the action on 
the student's academic record card. 

The following shall be the ordinary 
forms of suspension or dismissal : 

1. Registration cancelled. — This ac- 
tion shall be taken upon the discovery 
of facts which, if known previous to the 
student's registration, would have pre- 
vented such registration. The effect of 
this action is to invalidate any rights 
or privileges in relation to the College 
which the student has acquired during 
the period of his cancelled registration. 
It likewise entitles him to a return of 
his semester fees in full. 

2. Dropped for poor scholarship. — 
This action shall be recommended to 
the Council by the school faculties. It 
shall be understood that a student thus 
dropped may expect to be reinstated 
unless the action specifies permanent 
dropping. 

3. Dismissal. — This action shall lie 
taken in eases involving moral derelic- 
tion of such a nature as to make the 
student forever undesired in the College. 

4. Suspension. — This action shall be 
taken in cases of moral dereliction or 
serious violation of College regulations 
in whxh a limited penalty seems just. 

.">. Request to withdraw. — This action 
may be taken upon recommendation of 
a College administrative officer in cases 
where official suspension or dismissal 
seems impracticable or undesirable for 
special reasons It is understood that if 
the student does not comply with the 
request to withdraw, he may be sus- 
pended officially This action differs 
from official suspension in the point 
that the initiative in severing his con- 
nection with the College rests with the 
student This action, therefore, is not 
open to question as to evidence, jus- 
tice, etc, as are the others. 

The Council has also agreed that 
when students who have been dropped 



or suspended are reinstated, their 
names should be reported to the Council 
of Administration and be made a part 
of its minutes. 

Vi) USE NEW METHOD 

OF SCHEDULING EXAMS 

Because of the extended and increas- 
ing period which is now necessary for 
L'inal examinations and because of the 
■ arse number of conflicts arising un- 
der the present method of scheduling 
iliLse examinations, the Council has vot- 
ed to give the Assistant Registrar per- 
mission and authority to arrange the 

.n d examinations at the end of the 
rir.t semester, 1U22-3 and thereafter on 

he basis of scheduled hours; that is, 
ail classes or sections having their first 
recitation or lecture period at a given 
hour w.ll have their examinations 
scheduled at 8:30 on one morning or at 
1:30 on one afternoon during' the ex- 
amination week. 



-o- 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 
Sophomores 
Halloran, Cornelius Martin, ME. 
Lewis, John Geesey, Mug. 
Michael, Lewis Simon, ME. 
Williams, Robert Arthur. RME. 

Freshman 
lilwood, Levi Memice. CI. 
Two Year AgT. 
McCoy, Harry C. 

URST 100% DEPARTMENT 
The honor of being the first depart- 
ment in the College to subscribe 100 
pier cent to the Emergency Building- 
Fund Campaign goes to the Classical 
Department, composed of Dr. W. D. 
Crockett and Professor R. E. Dengler. 
The department will receive the first 
card indicating a 100 per cent subscrip- 
tion. 



DR. SPARKS RETURNS 

Dr. Edwin Erie Sparks returned to 
the college last week after an absence 
of four months during which time he 
traveled about 7500 miles, visited more 
than sixty colleges, and addressed ap- 
proximately 15,000 students in an ap- 
peal for a more serious attitude toward 
the scholastic side of college life. He 
missed only three of the states of the 
Union in his travels under the auspices 
of Phi Kappa Phi, honorary scholar- 
ship fraternity. Dr. Sparks met Penn 
State alumni in every college and he 
also attended reunions in many of the 
larger cities. He will teach a class in 
the Summer Session. 



CALENDAR 

TUESDAY, May 30 

Memorial Day parade at 10:00; 
Meeting on Front Campus at 11:00, 

Tennis, Penn State vs. Allegheny. Ar- 
mory Courts, 2:30. 

SATURDAY, June 3 

Baseball, Penn State vs. Syracuse. 
New Beaver. 

Tennis, Penn State vs. Syracuse. Ar- 
mory Courts. 

SUNDAY, June 4 

Chapel will be omitted. 

BULLETIN OUT EARLY 

TomcXrrowj (Tuesday) is Memorial 
Day and will be observed as a general 
holiday by the College. For that rea- 
son, the Faculty Bulletin is being issued 
a half-day earlier with the hope that it 
will thus reach the members of the 
faculty before they leave their offices 
Monday afternoon. Please note that 
the program for Commencement Week 
is printed on the back of the Bulletin. 



MEMORIAL DAY 

The program of events for Memorial 
Day tomorrow will be the same as ap- 
peared in the Bulletin last week and, 
in more detail, in the Collegian of last 
Friday. The parade will form at 10:00 
and the meeting on the front campus 
will begin at 11:00. 

MINING MUSEUM OPEN 

In order to permit faculty members 
and others interested to visit the Min- 
ing Museum on the second floor of the 
New Mining Building, arrangements 
have been made by Dean Moore to have 
the museum open during the following 
hours from now until after Commence- 
ment: Wednesdays from 2:30 to 5:00; 
Fridays from 3:30 to 5:00; Saturdays 
and Sundays from 1:30 to 5:00. 
o 

NO CHAPEL NEXT SUNDAY 

Attention of faculty members is call- 
ed to the fact that there will be no 
chapel exercises next Sunday morning. 
The following Sunday, June 11, will be 
Baccalaureate Sunday. 



The Liberal Arts faculty had two 
representatives at educational meetings 
in Philadelphia recently. Dr. A. E. Mar- 
tin attended meetings of the American 
Academy of Social and Political 
Sciences, while Professor C. W. Hasek 
attended the Foreign Trade Conference. 



Standard Time 



The Pennsylvania State College 



Calendar For Commencement Week 

1922 

FRIDAY, JUNE 9 

6:30 p. m. — Dinner for Class Reunions 

—McAllister Hall. 
7:00 p. m. — Freshman Stunts — Front 

Campus. 
7:30 p. m. — "Pomander Walk," by 

Penn State Players — 

Auditorium. 

SATURDAY, JUNE 10 

9:4.j a. m. — Annual Business Meeting 
of General Alumni Asso- 
ciation. — Brief address by 
President John M. Thom- 
as—Auditorium, 
12:00 a. m. — Alumni Luncheon, ALL 
ALUMNI TO ATTEND— 
Big Tent. 

1:00 p. m. — Alumni Parade and 
Stunts, Reunion Classes- 
Front Campus. 

2:00 p. m. — Baseball, University of 
Pittsburgh vs. Penn Stale 
—New Beaver Field. 

4:00 p. m. — Tennis, University of 
Pittsburgh vs. Penn State 
— Gymnasium Courts. 

5:00 p. in. — Dean of Women at Home 
to House Party Chaper- 
ones — Women's Building'. 

6:00 p. m. — Dinner and Business 

Meeting of Penn State 

Alumnae Club — McAllis- 
ter Hall. 

7:30 p. m. — Combined Musical Clubs 
Concert — Auditorium. 



9:00 p. m. — Alumni Gathering, Song 
and Talk Fest— Big 1 Tent. 

SUNDAY, JUNE 11 

10:30 p. m. — Baccalaureate Sermon, 
President John M. Thomas 
— Auditorium. 
4:00 p. m. — Concert, College Military 
Band — Front Campus or 
Auditorium. 

0:30 p. m.— Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. 
A. Meetings — Open Air 
Theatre. 

S:00 p. m. — Concert — Instrumental 
and Vocal — Auditorium. 



MONDAY, JUNE 12 

10:00 a. m. — Class Day Exercises — 
Open Air Theatre. 

11:00 a. ni. — Initiation and Annual 
Business Meeting of Phi 
Kappa Phi — Auditorium. 

2:00 J), m. — Annual Meeting of the 
Board of Trustees — Car- 
negie Library. 

2:00 p. m. — Track, University of 
Pittsburgh vs. Penn State 
—New Beaver Field. 

3: oil p. in. — Baseball, University of 
Pittsburgh vs. Penn State 
— New Beaver Field. 

7:00 p. m. — "The Fair Co-Ed" by The 
Thespians — Auditorium. 

TUESDAY, JUNE 13 

9:4") a. m. — Commencement Proces- 
sion. 

10:00 a. m. — Commencement Exercises 
— Auditorium. 

2:00 p. m. — Election of Trustees — 
Delegates in the Old 
Chapel — Alumni in Room 
180 Main. 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements ' and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME I 



State College, Pa., June 6, 1922 



NUMBER 32 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



LAST FACULTY BULLETIN 

This will be the last issue of the Far • 
ulty Bulletin for the present collegiate 
year. Publication will be resumed on or 
about next September 12. 



COLLEGE SENATE 
The June meeting' of the College Sen- 
ate will be held Thursday evening', June 
8, at 7:30 in the Foyer of the Auditor- 
ium. 



ORDER OF PROCESSIONS 

FOR COMMENCEMENT WEEK 

At the public college exercises on 
Sunday and Tuesday mornings, the en- 
tire faculty will be seated upon the plat- 
|>rm Academic costume will be worn 
bin io not obligatory- Caps will be re- 
mo . ed at the invocation and resumed at 
the recession. 

On both Baccalaureate Sunday and 
Commencement Day, faculty members 
will assemble in the Carnegie Library. 
On Sunday, faculty members assemble 
in Reading Room at 10:10 a. m. Order 
of procession will be: Presiding offi- 
cers; officiating clergyman; chaplain; 
trustees, official guests, the faculty, 
moving as far as practicable in order 
of academic rank; the senior class. On 
Tuesday, faculty will assemble at 9:25 
a. m. in Reading Room, with all 
the candidates for advanced de- 
grees in the Lobby, to left of the en- 
trance. Order of procession will be: 
Presiding officers; chaplain; presenting 
f'ffiers; other speakers; trustees; of- 
ficial cruets: the faculty as on Sunday; 
candidates for advanced degrees; the 
senior class. 

The procession will move from the li- 
brary in single column, double file; on 
entering lobby of the Auditorium by 
middle door, the chief marshall will di- 
vide the procession into two columns, 
double file, alternate pairs right and 
left, to move down each aisle simultan- 
eously. Seats will be taken on the stage 
in order of the procession, beginning 
with the first full row. Only the chairs 
for the chaplain, clergyman and official 
guests will be placarded in the front 
row. Recession will take place, in the 
same order, following the graduating 
class. 

In case of inclement weather on eith- 
er day, the assembling will take place 
in the foyer of the Auditorium as above 
outlined. 

J. H. OLBW1NE, Chairman, 
Committee on Public Appointments. 
o 

SENIOR GRADES 

All instructors are reminded that the 
grades of Seniors should be placed on 
separate sheets, marked "Senior Grades;" 
that because of the large class these 
grades should be reported promptly; and 
that they should all be in the Regis- 



trar's hands not later than 4:30 on 
Wednesday, June 7. 'Senior failures 
should be reported at once by telephone 
to the Registrar and the student's Dean. 
The grades of students other than 
Seniors should not be delayed later 
than June 16, which is one week after 
the last final examination. 

A. H. ESPENSHADE, Registrar. 



CALENDAR 



o 

HELP THE CAMPAIGN 

IN YOUR HOME TOWN 

Those members of the Faculty who 
are to remain in Pennsylvania during 
the vacation months can give material 
assistance in organization and publicity 
for the $2,000,000 campaign. Dr. S. W. 
Fletcher, Chairman of the Faculty Com- 
m ttee, has formulated these sugges- 
tions: 

When you go home get in touch with 
the Alumni chairman. He will want the 
benefit of your first-hand knowledge of 
Perm State and the progress of the 
campaign. You can prime yourself for 
these inquiries by visiting the Cam- 
paign Headquarters in Old Main before 
you depart from College. 

Get acquainted with your local edi- 
tor at home. He has had publicity ma- 
terial from Headquarters which has 
excited his interest. Talk to him about 
Penn State and its opportunities. If 
he wants facts or material you cannot 
supply, write to the Publicity Director 
in Old Main. 



en, the 
Xi : s lia 

scientist 



EUROPEAN APPRECIATION 

OF WORK OF DR. ARMSBY 

That the great work done at the Col- 
lr> - e i, ;•,,-. a j a ~v : nr ,r Prentiss 
Ar. usbj h s received inter a ional rec- 
ogn : 7ii by a o in 

Swed- 
'Landtmanne 

son, ore 0. ural 

The article, vvhi h .'us in 
the nature of an obituary, referred at 
some length to the work done here by 
Dr. Armsby, and classed his achieve- 
ments with those of Emil Wolff, Julius 
Kuhn and Oskar Kel'lner. He advised 
European scientific men tj acquaint 
themselves more fully with the work 
that Dr. Armsby has accomplished, lie 
further stated that with the death of 
Dr. Armsby, America's greatest agri- 
cultural scientist and authority in ani- 
mal nutrition has passed -iway. 



FIRST SEMESTER SCHEDULE 

Department heads may see the sched- 
ule for the next semester at the office 
of the Assistant Registrar, June 15 and 
16 and until noon of June 17. 

If it is necessary for the instructor 
to have advance information about his 
individual schedule, he should ask the 
head of his department to secure a copy. 

The Assistant Registrar will be ab- 
sent from .State College from July 1 
to August 16. 



TUESDAY, June 6 

There will be a meeting of the Fac- 
ulty of the School of Agriculture and 
Experiment Station in room 103, Ag. 
Building, at 4:30 today. — R. L. WATTS. 

THURSDAY, June 8 

College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Audi- 
torium. 

FRIDAY, June 9 

Penn State Players in "Pomander 
Walk," Auditorium, 8:15. 

SATURDAY, June 10 

Alumni Day. Baseball — Penn State 
vs. Pitt; tennis, Penn State vs. Pitt. 

SUNDAY, June 11 

Baccalaureate Sermon by President 
Thomas. 

MONDAY, June 12 

Class Day. Track, Penn State vs. 
Pitt; baseball, Penn State vs. Pitt. 



NEW STUDENTS 

The following table gives the number 
and classification of new students who 
have been admitted to the privileges of 
The Pennsylvania State College during 
the past year: 

Resident Graduate Students 63 

Seniors 2 

Juniors 8 

■iSophomores 54 

Freshmen 878 

Two Years' Course in Agriculture. 120 

Special Students 18 

Winter Course in Agriculture 118 

Summer Session for Teachers 1415 

Total Number of New Students__2676 

During the past year the number of 
new students admitted was 519 more 
than the number received during the 
previous year. 

The total number of different stu- 
dents who have received resident in- 
struction at the college during the past 
six years is 14,013, 

WITHDRAWALS FROM COLLEGE 

During the present academic year, 
290 students have withdrawn from col- 
lege. These were classified as follows : 

Seniors, 8; Juniors, 40; Sophomores, 
66; Freshmen, 147; Two-year Agricul- 
tural course, 16; Unclassified, 13. 

— — o ' 

Dean Sackett spoke to the Johnstown 
Kiwanis Club and the Johnstown Alum- 
ni recently in behalf of the building 
fund campaign. He also attended a con- 
ference in New York called by the In- 
, stitute of Chemical Engineers to con- 
sider instruction in chemical engineer- 
ing. 



- ■ ■ i : r ; ; pp. 



Published every Tuesday 
during 1 the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 2 



State College, Pa., September 12, 1922 



NUMBER.a 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



COLLEGE SENATE 
The lirst meeting of the College Sen- 
ate has been called for Wednesday 
evening, September 20, at 7:30 in the 
Foyer of the Auditorium. This is ne- 
cessitated because the speaking' pro- 
gram of President Thomas will make 
it imposssible for him to be here <>n 
Thursday evening, September 21, the 
regular time of meeting'. 

In the future, an effort will be made 
to hold the meetings of the Senate at 
the time provided in the Constitution 
and By-Laws, which is the third Thurs- 
day of every mouth. 



COUNCIL MEETING 
The first meeting of the Council of 
Administration will be held in the Pres- 
ident's Office on Thursday, September 
14, at 10:00 a. m. Council meetings 
will take place regularly on Monday of 
each week, but because yesterday was 
one of the registration days, the first 
meeting was advanced to Thursday. 



FACULTY CAMPAIGN COMMITTEE 

There will be a meeting of the Facul- 
ty Campaign Committee in the Presi- 
dent's Office, Old Main, today 
(Tuesday) at 4.00 o'clock.— S. W. 
Fletcher, chairman. 



FACULTY APPOINTMENTS 

At the June meeting of the Board of 
Trustees, the following new appoint- 
ments were made to the college faculty : 

J. Orvis Keller, Associate Professor of 
Industrial Engineering and head of the 
Department of Industrial Engineering. 

Paul Thayer, Professor of Pomology 
Extension. 

Ruth Graham, Assistant Professor of 
Domestic Art. 

J. W. Breneman, Instructor in Me- 
chanics and Materials of Construction. 

Charles K. Graeber, Teaching Fellow 
in Geology and Mineralogy. 

Levi O. Gratz, Assistant in Plant 
Pathology Extension. 

Henry iL. Haines, Jr., Instructor in 
Physical Education. 

L, M. Lindenmuth, Assistant in For- 
estry. 

Cecil J. Irvin, Assistant in Experi- 
mental Agronomy. 

Frank C. Lynn, Instructor in Me- 
chanical Engineering. 

B. K. Paget, Instructor in Mechan- 
ical Engineering. 

Charles W. Beese, Assistant Professor 
of Industrial Engineering. 

Hummel Fishburn, Graduate Manag- 
er of Student Activities and Assistant 
to the Dean of Men. 

Maude Avery, Cataloguer, Carnegie 
Library. 



NEW ADMINISTRATIVE 

HEADS ARE APPOINTED 

Three new administrative heads will 
come to Penn State this fall according' 
to appointments that have been recent- 
ly announced. They are Elmer A. Hol- 
brook, Dean of the School of Mines; 
Dr. Ernest B. Forbes, Head of the In- 
stitute of Animal Nutrition; and Rich- 
and W. Grant, Director of College Mu- 
sic. They succeed respectively. Dr. E. 
S. Moore, who goes to the University of 
Toronto; the late Dr. Henry Prentiss 
Armsby; and Clarence C. Robinson, 
who becomes Dean of Music at Ohio 
University. 

Dean Holbrook for the past two 
years has been assistant director of the 
United States Bureau of Mines, and for 
the last three months he has been 
acting-director. He is one of the best 
known mining specialists in the coun- 
try and Penn State is fortunate in se- 
curing his services. A graduate of 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
in 1904, Dean Holbrook has had wide 
mining and teaching experience. He 
will come to Penn State about October 
first. 

Dr. Forbes, the new head of An- 
imal Nutrition, is a graduate of the 
University of Illinois, and is & special- 
ist mi mineral elements in animal nu- 
trition. He comes to Penn State from 
Chicago where he has been serving as 
specialist in nutrition in the Institute of 
American Meat Packers, a trade organ- 
ization which is developing into a re- 
search and educational institution. He 
is probably best known for his work 
as Chief of the Department of Nutri- 
tion at the Ohio Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station from 1907 to 1920. Ho 
has already assumed his new duties 
here. 

Mr. Grant, the new Director of Mu- 
sic, comes to Penn State from Massa- 
chusetts, where he was director of 
school music in Winchester and of 
church music in Woburn. He is a 
graduate of Northampton Institute of 
Music Pedagogy and of the New Eng- 
land Conservatory of Music. Director 
Grant will be here for the opening of 
college. 

HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS 

In order that the mailing list of the 
Faculty Bulletin may be brought up to 
date, all Heads of Departments are re- 
quested to send to the Bulletin Editor, 
Old Main, the names of all new mem- 
bers of their departments, together with 
their room numbers ; and also the 
names of all who have resigned since 
the close of the last college year. 

o 

DR. DYE IS HONORED 
Dr. W. S. Dye, Jr., of the Department 
of English, was chosen as Grand Pres- 
ident of the Acacia (Masonic) Frater- 
nity at the 14th Conclave held at Law- 
rence, Kansas on the 4th, 5th and 6th 
of this month. He was the unanimous 
choice of the delegates. 



CALENDAR 



TUESDAY, September 12 

Faculty Campaign Committee meet- 
ing at 4:00 today in the President's 
Office. 

WEDNESDAY, September 13 

Opening Convocation, Auditorium, 
1 1 : 00 a. m. The faculty will occupy 
seats on the platform. 

Classes will begin according to sched- 
ule after noon. 

FRIDAY, September 15 

Annual Y. M. C. A. reception to new 
students and the Faculty at 7.00 p. m. 
cm the Front Campus. 

SUNDAY, September 17 

President Thomas will be the Chapel 
Speaker at both the 11.00 and 0.00 
o'clock services. 

This is the date set for the 'start of 
the Faculty Campaign. 



100% PARTICIPATION 

Announcement has been made by Dr. 
S. W. Fletcher, chairman of the Faculty 
Campaign Committee, that the facul- 
ty campaign will start on September 
17 and close on the 23rd. The goal has 
been set at "100 Percent Participation" 
and no faculty quota has been estab- 
lished. It is the aim of the committee 
to have every member of the faculty 
give "as his heart dictates and his 
purse permits." 

It is planned to register the percent 
of participation by Schools and special 
signs will be given to 100 percent de- 
partments. At present there are seven 
100 percent departments, as follows: 
Classical (Languages, Institute of Ani- 
mal Nutrition, Correspondence Courses 
in Agriculture, Chemical Agriculture, 
Engineering Extension, Office of the 
Head of the Department of Home Econ- 
omics, and Farm Machinery. Faculty 
cash and pledges thus far total $10,000. 



MAJOR WELTY IS 

NOW COMMANDANT 

Major M. D. Welty has been appoint- 
ed Professor of Military Science and 
Tactics at Penn State to succeed Lieu- 
tenant Colonel George B. Comly who 
left a few weeks ago to assume com- 
mand of the New Jersey National 
Guard Cavalry at Newark, N. J. 
Major Welty came to Penn State on 
July 30, 1919 when he was detailed by 
the Government to succeed Major 
James Baylies. 

Before assuming complete charge of 
the Military Department, the new Com- 
mandant is now acting as a headquar- 
ters field agent in the interest of the 
$2,000,000 Emergency Building Fund 
Campaign and is lining up the alumni 
for the big drive. 



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Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



VOLUME 2 



he Pennsylvania State College 



State College, Pa., September 19, 1922 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



NUMBER 2 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



COLLEGE SENATE 
The College Senate will meet for the 
first time this year tomorrow (Wednes- 
day) evening' at 7:30 in the Foyer of 
the Auditorium. 



SCHEDULES WANTED 

Each member of the teaching staff 
will please send to the office of the 
Assistant Registrar before October 
first, a copy of his actual schedule, in- 
dicating the room — giving number and 
building — in which he is located at any 
given time. — W. S. Hoffman, Assistant 
Registrar. 



PROBATION SECTION 

The following students 'have 'been 
admitted to the probation section in 
charge of the Dean of Men : 

Feaster, David V. 

Fell, Edward W. 

Foulkrod, H. E. 

French, Paul G. 

Fulmer, John M. 

Garrett, B. G. 

Heffner, Thomas. 

Kelley, Ralph R. 

Kenney, W. B. 

Lilley, J. Ray. 

McCormick, Henry F. 

Mairs, Thomas I., Jr. 

Means, Robert H. 

Neille, Chas. P. 

Reehl, Harold D. 

Shumberger, J. C. 

Smith, George W. 

Strickler, Dean G. 

Wallace, Wilbert B. 

Zerbe, Thomas C. 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 

A Graduate School was established 
by the Board of Trustees at their 
meeting last June, with Dr. Frank D. 
Kern as dean, and during the Summer 
Session more than 70 students were 
enrolled for graduate work. A number 
of faculty members have already reg- 
istered for graduate study during the 
coming college year. A copy of the 
Graduate Study Bulletin should have 
been received by every member of the 
Faculty, and any one who has not re- 
ceived it may receive a copy upon 
■equest to Dean KJern at the Botany 
Building. 



FACULTY RECEPTION 

The University Club will hold its 
tnnual reception to the Faculty on 
Mday evening of this week at 8:30 
i the club house. The reception will 
e informal and all faculty members 
nd their wives are cordially invited 
' attend. 



NEW RULES FOR USE 

OF COLLEGE ROOMS 

The following rules and regulations 
to govern the use of class and lecture 
rooms for collegiate activities for the 
coming term have been announced: 

The college will permit the use of 
class and lecture rooms, including the 
Auditorium and Old Chapel, for other 
than collegiate purposes under the fol- 
lowing regulations which are in ad- 
dition to any regulations now in force. 
Recognized student or college or- 
ganizations will be allowed to hold 
meetings in rooms designated by the 
school concerned under such regula- 
tions as may be authorized by the Dean 
of the school, or the superintendent of 
Grounds and Buildings for the Audi- 
torium and Main Building. 

Non-collegiate organizations may be 
authorized to use rooms with the con- 
sent of the Dean concerned and the 
Superintendent of Grounds and Build- 
ings jointly. The Auditorium and Main 
Building will be under the charge of 
the Superintendent of Grounds and 
Bu.ldings. 

No charge will be made for the use 
of rooms by recognized student or fac- 
ulty collegiate organizations for class 
or club meetings where no charge is 
lad for entertainment and where the 
room is left in the same condition as 
found. 

In all other cases a charge will be 
made to cover heat, light, janitor and 
maintenance service. Any costs for 
decorations, hauling, or similar service 
must be assumed by the organization 
using the room. 

The word "entertainment" is here 
used to cover such meetings as lec- 
tures, stage performances, dances, con- 
ventions, athletic returns, and business 
or social meetings, but these regula- 
tions are not intended to debar faculty 
members, resident in the college dormi- 
tories, from acting as host in social or 
business affairs. 

Auditorium: To be used by collegiate 
organizations only. For entertain- 
ments with admission charge, three 
per cent (3%) of gross receipts 
($20.00 minimum). For entertain- 
ments without admission charge or 
programs, no charge. 
Foyer: Not used except for special 
purposes and by special permission. 
No general student meetings. 
Old Chapel: For entertainments with 
admission charges, three per cent 
(3%) of gross receipts ($5.00 mini- 
mum). Non-collegiate organizations 
with admission charge, three per cent 
(3%) of gross receipts ($5.00 mini- 
mum). Without admissions five dol- 
lars ($5.00). 
Armory: Entertainment by recognized 
collegiate organizations five dollars 
($5.00). Entertainments when ad- 
mission is charged and profit accrues 



CALENDAR 

WEDNESDAY, September 20 
.College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of the 
Auditorium. 

FRIDAY, September 22 
Faculty reception at the University 
Club, 8:30. Informal. 

SATURDAY, September 23 
Football, Penn State vs. St. Bonaven- 
ture. New Beaver Field, 2:30. 
SUNDAY, September 24 
The Chapel Speaker will be Dr. 
Robert Bagnell, of Grace M. E. Church, 
Harrisburg. Dr. Bagnell spoke here 
during the Summer Session and made 
a very favorable impression. 

to individuals three per cent (3%) of 
gross receipts ($20.00 minimum. 
Ciass Rooms: Capacity over 75 three 
dollars ($3.00) per meeting. Capacity 
under 75 one and one-half dollars 
($1.50) per meeting. 

o 

PROFESSOR CHANDLEE HEAD 

OF CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT 

Professor G. C. Chandlee has return- 
ed to Penn State after a year and a 
half spent in graduate study at Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology and 
Columbia University, where he com- 
pleted the residence requirements for 
the doctorate degree. He has been ap- 
pointed head of the Chemistry Depart- 
ment, of which he was the acting- 
head previous to his leave of absence. 
o 

TIME OF CHAPEL 

Announcement made in last week's 
Bulletin that the evening chapel 
service would be held at 6.00 o'clock 
was incorrect. The time of services 
will be 11.00 a. m. and 6.30 p. m. 

FIRST FOOTBALL GAME 

The Penn State football season will 
open next Saturday when St. Bona- 
venture will be the opposing eleven. 
The game will start at 2:30 and will 
be held on New Beaver Field. 
o 

THE MAILING LIST 

During the past week, the mailing- 
list for the Faculty Bulletin has been 
revised and should be nearly correct. 
If any member of the faculty is not 
receiving it a word to the editor will 
correct the difficulty. 



REPRESENTS PENN STATE 
Miss L. V. T. Simmons, head of the 
Department of German, will officially 
represent the College at the inaugura- 
tion of President Marion Edwards 
Park, of Bryn Mawr College, on Oc- 
tober 21st. 



ENROLLMENT OF STUDENTS 

BY SCHOOLS, CLASSES, AND COURSES 

12 O'CLOCK NOON, SEPT. 16, 1922 



Senior 



Junior 



Soph. 



Fresh.. 



Special 2-Yr. 



Total 



SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 

Ag. Ed 

Agro. 

A. H 

Bot 

Ch. Ag 

D. H. 

For. 

Hort. 

L. Arch 

P. H 

Agriculture 

First Year 

Second Year 

Total 

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

A. Eng 8 

Arch. 

E. E 74 

Ech. E 9 

C. E 21 

S. E 1 

M. E 32 

R. M. E 1 

Mllg 

I. E 23 

Total 175 

SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Classical 1 

Com. and Fin 63 

Ed. and Psy 16 

Mod. Lang 18 

Pre-Leg 19 

Math 1 

Liberal Arts 

Total OS 

SCHOOL OF MINES 

Met 12 

Mining 9 

Mng. Geol ____ 5 

Total ~26 

SCHOOL OF NATURAL SCIENCE 

Chem 8 

Ind. Chem 29 

Nat. Sci 12 

Pre. Med 1 

Phys _J 

Total 41 

DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Dom. Art 5 

Dom. Sci 17 

Home Eco 

V. H. E _n 

Total _39 

TOTAL... 496 



20 


14 


28 


19 


1 






6 


13 












4 


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1 


3 






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1 1 


12 












16 


30 












15 


11 


33 


30 








11 


23 






2 






5 


3 


3 


ii 








5 


5 


115 


118 


1 

3 


79 

99 




97 


!34 


179 


173 


8 


178 


769 



7 


17 


28 


2 




5 


4 




88 


86 


114 


1 


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11 


15 




31 


46 


91 


3 


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52 


57 


82 


3 


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4 




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35 


39 


53 


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232 



146 



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4 

17 

1 



48 



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20 



29 



619 



266 



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116 


24 


22 


12 


20 


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211 



211 



i;- 



48 



43 
3 

21 



65 

53 
8 

47 



68 



21 

28 



108 



15 
28 



49 



43 



796 



991 



17 



12 



40 



1081 



673 



171 



•66 



160 



178 



3120 









Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty 



The Pennsylvania State College 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 2 



State College, Pa., September 26, 1922 



NUMBER 3 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 
TO THE FACULTY! 

I wish to express my sincere appre- 
ciation of the loyal and generous spirit 
shown by the Faculty in their partici- 
pation in the ?2, 000, 000 campaign. I 
think I know something of the sacri- 
fice which they are making to help the 
college, and I am very deeply grateful. 
This testimony in substantial form to 
the faith the Faculty have in Penn 
State will impress favorably both our 
Alumni and the people of the State. It 
will be a great stimulus to the success 
of the campaign. To Dr. Fletcher and 
his associates on the Faculty Commit- 
tee, and to all my colleagues who have 
made the Faculty part in this great en- 
deavor so successful, I return most 
earnest thanks. 

JOHN M. THOMAS. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 

Junior 

Deal, Harry Calvin, EE 

Sophomore 
Erb, George Styer, Chem 

Freshmen 

Harry, Edward William, Mng 
Kintner, Charles Welles, Mng 
Long, Joseph Kermit, EE 
St. Clair, Lyle, L. Arch 
Tormay, Joseph A., EE 

Special 

Burriss, Robert Eugene, Jr., Mllg Eng 



CONSERVE THE WATER 

All departments and faculty members 
are urged to conserve water in the 
laboratories. Water is now extremely 
scarce and only strict conservation will 
tide the College over this drought. The 
last rains did not contribute to the wa- 
ter supply, for the ground was so dry 
that the rainfall was all absorbed and 
no water went into the streams. 



JAPANESE PLAYERS 

As its share in the campaign for a 
$2,000,000 Emergency Building Fund 
for Penn State, the State College Wo- 
man's Club has arranged for an even- 
ing of entertainment by Japanese play- 
ers, to be held in the Auditorium at 
8:15 on Friday, October 6th. Reserved 
seats will be fifty and seventy-five 
cents and will be on sale at the Ath- 
letic Store on October 4th and 5th 
from 6: 00 to 8: 00 p. m. Proceeds will 
be donated to the campaign. 



PENN STATE NOW HAS 

PHILADELPHIA OFFICE 

During the past summer, Penn State 
opened up an office in Philadelphia, 
under the direction of Dean Sackett, to 
care for the interests of the College 
in that section of the state particularly 
in connection with the Building Fund 
Campaign. Through the courtesy of 
the Agricultural Extension Ser- 
vice a very convenient location 
was found at 247 South Jun- 
iper Street, where the Agricultural and 
Engineering Extension representatives 
may be reached. 

The office originally provided head, 
quarters for the local work of the Home 
Economics department which is rep- 
resented in Philadelphia by Miss Mary 
Spalding and Miss Mary Rogers. In 
addition to campaign matters, Dean 
Sackett is also caring for the Engineer- 
ing Extension activities, so that with 
the combined activities of Home Econ- 
omics Extension, Engineering Exten- 
sion, and Building Fund Campaign, the 
office is a hive of industry. 

Dean Sackett spent practically the 
entire summer in Philadelphia, while 
at various times Professor N. C. Miller, 
head of the Engineering Extension De- 
partment, and C. G. Gaum, general 
supervisor of Engineering Extension, 
assisted in looking after College inter- 
ests. More recently Robert Spahr, 
formerly of the Massachusetts Ex- 
tension Department, has been added to 
the force. There are now eight repre- 
sentatives of Penn State doing exten- 
sion service and aiding in the campaign 
in Philadelphia. 



CALENDAR 



TO (JIVE RE-EXAMS IN 

SUMMER SUBJECTS 

By vote of the College Senate regular 
students of the College who fail with a 
D grade in a Summer Session subject 
will be permitted to take a re- 
examination at the time appointed for 
Re-examinations just before the open- 
ing of the first semester. 



UNIVERSITY CLUB 

The University Club subscription 
dance announced for Friday, October 
6th, has been changed to Saturday, Oc- 
tober 7 th, because of the Campaign 
Benefit Performance by Japanese Play, 
ers on the former night. Club night, 
scheduled for the 7th will be omitted. 
o 

FAIL TO ENTER 

According to figures given out by the 
Registrar, 224 of the applicants who 
were granted admission to The Penn- 
sylvania State College as Freshmen 
during the past summer have failed to 
present themselves for matriculation. 



SATURDAY, September 30 

Football, Penn State vs. William and 
Mary College, New Beaver, 2:30. 

Smoker, University Club, evening. 

SUNDAY, Octet er 1 

Chapel Speaker, the Rev. Dr. John 
McDowell, Board of Home Missions, 
New York City. 



TH1 



FACULTY SUBSCRIBES 

$34,000 TO BUILDING FUND 

With practically every department on 
the campus a 100 percent department, 
and a number of pledges still out, the 
results of the Faculty Campaign, as 
part of the $2,000,000 building fund 
campaign, totalled ¥34,000 Monday 
morning. 

When all pledges have been received 
and one or two more departments heard 
from, this sum will be swelled to an 
even greater total. 



STUDENTS OPEN CAMPAIGN 

Starting with a huge mass meeting 
on the Front Campus last night, the 
students have launched their campaign 
in support of the Emergency Building 
Fund. They have set as their goal 
100 per cent participation and have also 
determined to set $100 per student as 
the figure to be pledged. This will 
serve as a class memorial for each class 
now in college and payments will come 
due following graduation. The stu- 
dent fund will be used for transform- 
ing Old Main into the Students' Union, 
or social hall. 

o ■ 

PINCHOT COMING 

Word has been received from Repub. 
lican County Chairman Mayes that 
Gifford Pinchot will be in Centre County 
on Friday and that he may pass through 
State College that afternoon. It is pos- 
sible that arrangements may be made 
for him to speak here at that time, in 
which case further announcement will 
be made. 

o 

ASST. REGISTRAR'S HOURS 

Until further notice the office hours 
of the Assistant Registrar will be Mon- 
day, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, 
from 9: 00 to 12: 00. It will be useless 
to call or phone at hours other than 
these. — W. S. Hoffman, Assistant Reg- 
istrar. 



1 3 



l L D 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 2 



State College, Pa., October 3, 1922 



NUMBER 4 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



SENATE MEMBERSHIP 

The following persons constitute the 
present membership of the College Sen- 
ate: 

D. A. Anderson 
Hugo Bezdek 
R. U. Blasingame 
C. A. Bonine 
A. A. Borland 

0. F. Boucke 
P. B. Breneman 
R. G. Bressler 
R. D. Casselberry 
Miss Edith P. Chare 
W. G. Chambers 
G. C. Chandlee 
W. R. Chedsey 
R. E. Dengler 

E. H. Dusham 
R. A. Dutcher 
W. S. Dye, Jr. 
A. H. Espenshade 
J. A. Ferguson 
S. W. Fletcher 

E. B. Forbes 

1. L. Foster 

F, D. Gardner 
R. W. Grant 
W. R. Ham 
C. L. Harris 
,T. B. Hill 

E. A. Holbrook 
J. O. Keller 

F. D. Kern 

C. L. Kinsloe 
H. C. Knandel 
Miss M. A. Knight 
O. A. Knight 
A. L. Kocher 
M. S. McDowell 

D. F. McFarland 
A. E. Martin 
T. W. Mason 
C. F. Noll 
H. G. Parkinson 
F. L. Pattee 
J. P. Ritenour 
C. W. Robinson 

E. W. Runkle 
R. L. Sackett 
H. B. Shattuck 
Miss L. V. T. Simmons 
H. J. Sloman 
O. F. Smith 
R. H. Smith 
C. W. Stoddart 
J. M. Thomas 
W. H. Tomhave 

F. M. Torrence 
J. H. Tudor 
E. D. Walker 
A. R. Warnock 
R. L. Watts 
M. D. Welty 
J. M. Willard 
A. J. Wood ^ 



HONOR SOCIETY COUNCIL 

There will be a meeting of the Honor 
Society Council this evening at 7:00 
?. m., in the office of the Dean of Men. 



THE FACULTY CAMPAIGN 

Final returns on the faculty partici- 
pation in the $2,000,000 Emergency 
Building Fund Campaign were an- 
nounced on Friday by Dr. S. W. Fletch- 
er, chairman of the committee, and 
showed that the goal of "100 per cent 
participation" had been reached. Every 
department in the College subscribed 
unanimously, swelling the total amount 
pledged to $44,676. A total of 532 mem- 
bers of the faculty and clerical staff 
contributed to the fund. 



CALENDAR 



PHI BETA KAPPA 

The Phi Beta Kappa Association of 
State College will meet on Friday 
at 4:30 in Room 25, Liberal Arts 
Building, to vote upon the new constitu- 
tion. All members of the Association 
are urged to attend and to bring along 
any new Phi Beta Kappa members who 
are on the Campus. All such new mem- 
bers are asked to send their names and 
addresses to the Secretary, R. E. Deng- 
ler, Box 3, Main Building. 



GAMMA SIGMA HELTA 

Dr. E. D. Ball, director of scientific 
work in the U. S. Department of Agri. 
culture, and national president of 
Gamma Sigma Delta, Agricultural Hon- 
or Society, will install the Penn State 
Chapter of Gamma Sigma Delta next 
Tuesday evening, October 10. All mem- 
bers of the Society are requested to 
get in touch with Professor Dutcher, 
department of Chemical Agriculture, be- 
fore October fifth if possible. 



AVE NEED HELP 

The Faculty Bulletin was instituted 
as a medium for the conveying of in- 
formation to members of the Faculty. 
Notices of meetings, of special feat- 
ures, or of anything of interest should 
be sent to the Bulletin Editor for pub- 
lication. K possible, such contribu- 
tions should be received by the after- 
noon of Friday preceding date of pub- 
lication. The dead line is 11.00 o'clock 
on ISaturday. 



A classified list of all Research Pro- 
jects in Agriculture carried on by the 
Agricultural Experiment Stations has 
been placed in the Library of the School 
of Agriculture. 



Penn State will play Gettysburg in 
football on Saturday at 2: 30 on New 
Beaver Field. The Freshmen play 
Bellefonte Academy on Old Beaver at 
1: 00 o'clock. 



TUESDAY, October 3 

Honor Society Council, 7: 00. Dean 
Warnock's Office. 

FRIDAY October 6 

Phi Beta Kappa Asssociation, 4: 30, 
Room 25 Liberal Arts. 

Japanese Players, Campaign Benefit 
Performance, under auspices of State 
College Woman's Club, Auditorium, 
S: 15. Tickets on sale at Athletic Store. 
Wednesday and Thursday, 6: 00 to 8: 00 
p. m. 

SATURDAY, October 7 

Football, Penn State Freshmen vs. 
Bellefonte Academy. 1: 00, Old Beaver. 
Varsity vs. Gettysburg, 2: 30, New Bea- 
ver. 

University Club subscription dance, 
8: 00 to 12: 00. 

SUNDAY, October 8 
Chapel Speaker — The Rev. G. G. At- 
kins, of the First Congregational 
Church, Detroit, Mich. 

SCHOOL LUNCH REOPENS 

Beginning tomorrow, Wednesday, the 
Senior Home Economics Girls will serve 
a school lunch every Monday Tuesday, 
Wednesday, and Thursday in Room 14 
of the Woman's Building, at 12: 15. All 
food is sold practically at cost. Mem.. 
bers of the faculty who are unable to 
get home for the noon meal will be 
welcome. 



-o 

SIGMA XI 

A local association has been formed 
by members of the Society of Sigma Xi 
who reside in State College or vicinity, 
with Dr. F. D. Kern as president, and 
Professor C. Emory Myers, secretary- 
treasurer. In order that the member- 
ship list may be complete it is asked that 
all members of Sigma Xi send their 
names and addresses to the secretary 
at the Horticultural Building. 



GIRLS IN COLLEGE 

The number of young women under, 
graduates now in college is 316, divided 
as follows among the several classes: 
Seniors, 70; Juniors, 75; Sophomores, 
84; Freshmen, 79; Unclassified, 8. 

The 308 women students who are 
candidates for degrees are distributed 
as follows: Agriculture, 5; Liberal 
Arts, 132; Natural Science, 12; De- 
partment of Home Economics, 159. 

The 107 young women students who 
entered college this year have been 
classified as follows: Juniors, 10; 
Sophomores, 18; Freshmen 79. 



W .P. CROCKETT. 

3 13 K A I N BLDG 



...*. ■ ! < 



Published every Tuesday 
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ty- 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 2 



State College, Pa., October 10, 1922 



NUMBER 5 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



SENATE ACTION 

The College Senate recently adopted 
the following regulations for the auth. 
prizing of college entertainments and 
other public assemblies : 

1. The Committee on Student Welfare 
shall have the duty of authorizing any 
public assembly in a college building or 
on the college grounds. 

2. In the performance of this duty 
this Committee shall examine the na- 
ture of the program to be given, the 
personnel of the proposed cast, the fi- 
nancial budget, and the desirability of 
the professional coach employed, in 
case such services are used. It shall 
also be represented at any rehearsal 
of the proposed performance and shall 
have the authority to censor or forbid 
such performance, so that the reputa- 
tion and best interests of the College 
may be safeguarded. 

3. The Committee shall maintain an 
iadvisory relationship wth the business 
managers of all productions and the 
treasurers of all dramatic and musical 
organizations in order to prevent waste 
and misappropriation of funds. In case 
a professonal coach is employed, his 
fee shall be deposited with the Commit- 
tee by the employer organization, and 
the Committee shall pay the fee to the 
coach, if in the opinion of the Commit- 
tee the coach has satisfactorily fulfillled 
his contract. 

4. This Committee shall also have the 
power of arranging the schedule of all 
public occasions in order that no con- 
flict may ensue. 

5. In the performance of this last 
duty the Committee shall establish and 
maintain a calendar of events listed 
under its supervision, such calendar to 
be kept in an accessible place for the 
information of persons interested. 

6. The Committee may assign the 
execution of these provisions to some 
one of its members, preferably the 
Dean of Men. 



ATTEND MEETINGS 

Dean R. L. Watts and Professor J. A. 
Ferguson attended a meeting of the ex- 
ecutive committee of the State Conser- 
vation Council at Harrisburg last week. 
Dean Watts is president of the Council 
and Professor Ferguson is secretary. 
Dean Watts also attended conservation 
meetings in Lewistown, York and Lan- 
caster last week. 



-o- 



CAMPAIGN EE SUETS 

Up to Friday night of last week, there 
were signed pledge blanks at Campaign 
Headquarters for a total of $440,081.82. 
Returns from the general campaign 
were just beginning to come in and it 
was estimated that by the first of this 
week, the mercury in the big thermom- 
eter in front of Old Main would register 
the $500,000 mark, or one-fourth of the 
Two Million Dollar Goal. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL MAS 

SEVENTY- FIVE STUDENTS 

Statistics that have just been compil- 
ed by Dean F. D. Kern of the Graduate 
School show that there are 75 graduate 
students carrying class work this se- 
mester. This does not include a num- 
ber who are registered but who are not 
carrying class work, either because they 
have completed the class work or be- 
cause they are devoting all of their 
time to the thesis. 

Of the 75, three are candidates for 
technical degrees while 13 are not can- 
didates for degrees There are nine 
women students enrolled while 16 grad- 
uate students are not associated with 
the college as members of the instruc- 
tional staff There are 40 new students, 
16 of them being graduates of Penn 
State, while the remaining 24 represent 
a total of 23 different institutions. 
Of these institutions six are in 
Pennsylvania, while the others rep- 
resent 12 different states. Ohio has 
three representatives and leads the 
others. New York and Connecticut 
each have two representatives, while the 
following states have one each : Ken- 
tucky, New Jersey, Delaware, Massa- 
chusetts, Missouri, Indiana, Illinois, 
Maine and North Carolina. 

Of the 75 graduate students carrying 
class work at present, the greatest num- 
ber are majoring in the Liberal Arts 
School, with Agriculture second, and 
Natural Science third. The totals are 
as follows: Liberal Arts 32; Agricul- 
ture 17; Natural Science 11; Engi- 
neering 9; Mines 2; Home Economics 
2; Unclassified 2. 



ATTENDS MINING- CONG-BESS 
Professor W. R. Chedsey is attending 
the annual convention of the American 
Mining Congress in Cleveland this week. 
Professor Chedsey will also attend the 
fall meeting of the Coal Mining Insti- 
tute of the 15th Bituminous District of 
Pennsylvania at Barnesboro on October 
21, when he will deliver a paper. 



LECTURE ON BESEABCH 

Dr. E. D. Ball, director of scientific 
work in the U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture, will speak on "The Place of Re- 
search in National Development" under 
the auspices of Gamma Sigma Delta, 
agricultural honor society, tonight at 
8:00 in room 100 Hort Building. The 
meeting is open to the public. 

o 

CHANGE IN NAME 

At a meeting of the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Board of Trustees held 
here last week, action was taken chang- 
ing the name of the Publicity Depart- 
ment to The Department of Public In- 
formation. 

o 

LIBERAL ARTS FACULTY 
The Liberal Arts Faculty meeting will 
be postponed until Wednesday, October 
25. — Miss L. V. T. Simmons, secretary. 



TUESDAY, October 10 
Research lecture by Dr. E. D. Ball, 
Room 100 Hort, 8:00 p. m. 

SATURDAY, October 14 
Football, Penn State vs. Lebanon Val- 
ley, New Beaver, 2:30. 

Club Night at the University Club. 

SUNDAY, October 15 
The Chapel Speaker will be the Rev- 
erend Dr. Clarence A. Barbour, of the 
Rochester Theological Seminary, Roch- 
ester, N. Y. 

110 NEW STUDENTS 

FROM OTHEE COLLEGES 

At the opening of College this fall 110 
new students entered Penn State with 
more or less academic credit for advanc- 
ed standing from 54 different schools, 
colleges, and universities, according to 
figures just announced by Dr. Mar- 
quardt, the College Examiner. They are 
as follows: 

From the University of Pennsylvania, 
11; University of Pittsburgh, 8; Buck- 
nell, 6; Lehigh, 5; Allegheny, Carnegie 
Tech, Columbia, Cornell, Dickinson, 
Drexel Institute, Geneva, Juniata, La- 
fayette, Millersville State Normal, Wash- 
ington and Jefferson, Westminster, 3 
each ; Edinboro State Normal, Hood 
College, Slippery Rock State Normal, 
Valparaiso University, Virginia Poly- 
technic Institute, Western Reserve, 2 
each; Amherst, Bethany, California 
State Normal, Cumberland Valley State 
Normal, University of Detroit, Du- 
quesne University, Franklin and Mar- 
shall, Georgetown, University of Georgia, 
Goucher College, Grove City, Indiana 
University, Irving College, Johns Hop- 
kins, Kutztown State Normal, Lock 
Haven Normal, Mansfield State Normal, 
University of Michigan, Muhlenberg, 
New Y-ork State College for Teachers, 
Ohio University, University of Oklaho- 
ma, Princeton, Stevens Institute of 
Technology, Temple University, Univer- 
sity of Tennessee, Washington and Lee, 
Waynesburg College, Wilson College, 
W'ooster College, 1 each. 

These 110 students who entered with 
advanced standing were classified as fol- 
lows: 

Juniors 19, Sophomores 71, Freshmen 
18, Special students 2; and three others, 
classified as Juniors 1, Sophomores 1, 
Freshmen 1, whose classification was 
determined chiefly by the credit they had 
secured at this College previous to their 
re-entering it during the past year with 
advanced standing from other institu- 
tions. 

The foregoing statistics show an in- 
crease in the number of Advanced 
Standing applicants who were admitted 
this fall over the numbr admitted last 
fall of almost 43 per cent. 



n n r.' r<. r> '.' ' f "V 

- • ■; - t > ' 1 ' n "" 



Published every Tuesday 
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means of making official an- 
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The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 2 



State College, Pa., October 17, 1922 



NUMBER 6 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



COLLEGE SENATE 

The regular meeting of the College 
Senate will be held on Thursday even- 
ing, October 19, at 7:30 in the Foyer of 
the Auditorium. 

o 

STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 
Sophomore 
Motter, Foster Charles, CF. 

Freshmen 
Farkash, Francis Joseph, DH. 
Wherry, George Emerson ME 

o 

AG. FACULTY MEETING 
There will be a meeting of the fac- 
ulty of the School of Agriculture and 
Experiment Station in Room 103 of the 
Agricultural Building on Thursday, at 
4:30 p. m. 

o ■ 

AG. RESEARCH STAFF 

The Research Staff of the School of 
Agriculture and Experiment Station will 
meet at 3:30 p. m. on Thursday in 
Room 103 of the Agricultural Building. 
-R. L. Watts. 

o 



ALUMNI DAY PROGRAM 

The annual celebration of Alumni 
Home Coming Day will take place at 
Penn State next Saturday, although 
the program will officially start on Fri- 
day night with a football mass meeting 
n preparation for the game with Mid- 
dlebury College. A general alumni 
neeting will be held in the Auditorium 
3n Saturday morning when results of 
the Emergency Building Fund Cam- 
paign to that time will be announced. 
The football game with Middlebury, 
[the Alma Mater of President Thomas, 
Isvill take place at two-thirty on New 
(Beaver Field, while the final event of 
the day will be a get-together and 
smoker in the Armory at 8:30 Saturday 
evening. 

o 

MONA MORGAN RECITAL 

The Penn State Players will present 
VIona Morgan in a recital of "Romeo 
|md Juliet" on Thursday evening of 
his week in the Auditorium. Miss 



lorgan will be remembered for her ex- 
ellent reading of "Hamlet" and "The 
'aming of the Shrew" when she was 
ere last year. Admission is twenty- 
ive cents and seats are reserved. 

AG. EXTENSION NOTICE 

A conference of agricultural extension 
medalists and county representatives 
ill be held Friday of this week. There 
ill b6 two sessions, one in the morn- 
ig at 9:30 and the other in the after- 
>on at 1:30. 



FACULTY COOPERATION 

NEEDED FOR RADIO 

In the near future a college radio 
broadcasting station will be in opera- 
tion on the campus, and regular broad- 
casting programs will be given, proba- 
bly five nights a week. As this will 
be the only station of its kind between 
Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, ;it will 
be of great value to the college and of- 
fer an opportunity for faculty members 
to give information to the general pub- 
lic. 

The broadcasting apparatus is the 
gift of alumni in Pittsburgh, and as 
soon as the balance of the necessary 
equipment arrives it will be set up in 
new quarters back of the University 
Cluli. Three ninety-feet high towers 
with modern antennae are to replace 
the unsatisfactory steel tower. The 
station will be operated under the direc- 
tion of Professor Kinsloe and the el- 
ectrical engineering department. 

It is desired at this time to call the 
attention of faculty members to their 
share in the broadcasting programs. 
Limited space at the station will not 
allow a varied musical program, and 
most of the broadcasting will have to 
be talks by faculty members. The De- 
partment of Public Information (for- 
merly Publicity Dept.) will arrange the 
program for each day's broadcasting 
and as soon as the possibilities of the 
service can be determined, a question- 
naire will be sent to each faculty mem- 
ber asking what he has to offer in the 
nature of talks, entertainments features, 
etc., for program scheduling. The daily 
programs will be made up from these 
replies and each person notified of ac- 
ceptable material far enough in ad- 
vance so as to permit of thorough pre- 
paration. 

It may be at least a month before 
regular and full programs can be prop- 
erly broadcasted, though every effort 
is being made to rapidly set up the sta- 
tion. 



CALENDAR 



TRUSTEES TAKE ACTION 

ON PENNSYLVANIA DAY 

On the recommendation of the Coun- 
cil of Administration, the Executive 
Committee of the Board of Trustees, at 
its recent meeting, took the following 
action concerning Pennsylvania Day, 
to go into effect this fall: 

"That Pennsylvania Day be not ob- 
served as an official college event for 
the entertainment of the general pub- 
lic, and that for the present it be ob- 
served as a student social and athletic 
occasion ; 

"That hereafter the College set aside 
no particular day for visits of inspec- 
tion and entertainment of the general 
public, but instead that occasions be 
arranged for visits of inspection and 
conference on special group interests of 
the college." 



WEDNESDAY, October 18 

Lecture by Dr. Ham, Physics Build- 
ing, 7:30 p. m. 

THURSDAY, October 19 

Agricultural Research Staff meets, 
3: 30, Room 103 Ag. 

Agricultural Faculty meets, 4:30, in 
Room 103 Ag. 

College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Audi- 
torium. 

Mona Morgan Recital, Auditorium, 
8: 15. 

FRIDAY, October 20 

University Club smoker, members 
only. 

SATURDAY, October 21 

Football, Penn State vs Middlebury, 
New Beaver, 2:30. 

Club night at the University Club. 
SUNDAY, October 22 

Chapel Speaker — Dr. Edwin C. 
Broome, Superintendent of Schools, 
Philadelphia. 

SCIENTIFIC LIBRARY LEFT 

TO COLLEGE BY DR. FREAR 

Through the will of Dr. William Frear, 
late vice-director of the Agricultural 
Experiment Station, the College has re- 
ceived a most valuable collection of 
scientific books and reports which will 
be given a permanent place in the Lib- 
rary of the School of Agriculture. It 
was the wish of Dr. Frear that his 
scientific library be maintained as a 
special collection in the library, and in 
accepting the bequest, the College Trus- 
tees have directed that Dr. Frear's 
wishes be carried out. The collection 
will be of particular value to students 
in Chemical Agriculture. 



FACULTY FOOTBALL TICKETS 

Announcement has been made by the 
Athletic Office concerning the distribu- 
tion of tickets for the football game 
with Middlebury College next Saturday, 
Alumni Home Coming Day. All fac- 
ulty tickets will be distributed through 
the offices of the deans of the various 
schools just as was done last year. It 
is probable that the faculty section will 
be in the new stands. 



DR. HAM TO SPEAK 

Dr. W. R. Ham, head of the Depart- 
ment of Physics, will address the State 
College Branch of the American Asso- 
ciation for the Advancement of Science 
tomorrow (Wednesday) evening at 7:30 
in the Physics Building. His subject 
will be "Experimental Evidence For 
and Against the Variation of Mass with 
Velocity and Its Bearing on the Special 
Theory of Relativity." The meeting 
will be open to all members of the fac- 
ulty and to others who are interested. 



i . 



' : '■ id 



yr lev 



B 



Published every Tuesday 
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The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETI 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



/OLUME 2 



State College, Pa., October 24, 1922 



NUMBER 7 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



TO ALL FACULTY MEMBERS! 

During the first few weeks of the 
•ampaign our organization both in 
Pennsylvania and outside has devoted 
ts attention to obtaining 100 percent 
patricipation by alumni. 

Beginning this week it will be nec- 
sssary for us to obtain subscriptions 
'ram those well-to-do citizens, mostly 
n the state, who are friendly to the 
College. We cannot expect that al- 
imni subscriptions will complete the 
12,000,000 Fund. 

In this latter phase of the campaign, 
nembers of the Faculty can be of great 
issistance. While, owing to the splend- 
id exhibition of loyalty and sacrifice 
lready given by the Faculty, I hesi- 
ate to call upon you for further assis- 
ance, I do desire to present an oppor- 
unity, which you may care to accept. 

Several members of the Faculty 
ave suggested that they might be able 
o secure large subscriptions from 
riends, or at least suggest names of 
'■respective donors. These offers have 
ieen gratefully accepted at Headquar- 
ers. If you know men or women who 
night contribute to he campaign, I 
ope you will communicate at once 
nth me or my office. 

Each member of the Faculty should 
onsider this as his campaign. I need 
iot restate what its outcome will mean 
o all of us whose fortunes are bound 
ip with the future of the College. I, 
herefore, wish to say that any service 
ou can perform toward increasing the 
''und as I have indicated will be deep- 
y appreciated. In making this state- 
nent, I want you to feel that you are 
s much a part of the campaign as any 
f our numerous campaign chairmen. 

Faithfully yours, 

JOHN M. THOMAS 
President 



-o- 



NOTICE TO ALL SCHOOLS 

AND DEPARTMENT DEADS 

Five copies of all revisions in under- 
graduate curricula and courses, regu- 
ar and summer sessions, must be in the 
lands of the Chairman of the Commit- 
tee on Courses of Study Nov. 1, 1922. 

It is necessary that the information 
•equested in the notices sent to Deans 
ind Heads of Departments on Sept. 25, 
922, be supplied.— C. W. Stoddart, 
hairman. 



LIBERAL ARTS FACULTY 

There will be a Liberal Arts Faculty 
neeting tomorrow at 4:30 in room 25 
'i the Liberal Arts Building. — Miss L. 
'• T. Simmons, secretary. 



COUNCIL ACTION 

At a meeting of the Council of Ad- 
ministration last week, the following 
action of interest to faculty members 
was taken : 

At the request of Dr. Sparks, it was 
voted that all classes be dismissed at 
4:20 p. m. on Monday, October 30, in 
order to permit all students to attend 
the unveiling of the Memorial Tablet 
at Center Furnace. 

The Council agreed that this year 
Pennsylvania Day, (November 11) be 
considered a holiday. However, it al- 
so voted that all mention of Pennsyl- 
vania Day henceforth be omitted from 
the College calendar, and that Thanks- 
giving Day, Memorial Day, and July 
1th be designated in the calendar as 
holidays. 

The matter of. appropriate exercises 
for Armistice Day was referred to the 
Committee on Student Welfare with 
power to make such arrangements 
as the Committee sees fit. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past \veek the following 
students have left college: 

Juniors 
Andrews, Clement Matthews, CF. 
Shultz, Ernest Russell, iCE 

Sophomore 
Yost, Russell R., CE. 

Freshmen 
Creigh, John Herbert, EE. 
" inton. Donald Weaver, EE. 

1st Year, Two Year Ags 
Murphy, Robert Russell, 



UNIVERSITY CLUB 

The University Club will hold its 
Hallowe'en Party on Friday night of 
this week. It will be an informal din- 
ner dance and reservations must be 
made with Mr. Clayton before Wed- 
nesday. Saturday night will be club 
night. 

A new interpretation of Article VIII, 
Section 5, of the Club House Rules has 
been made by the Board of Directors, 
dealing with the annual Christmas 
revels. It is as follows: "Christmas 
revels are restricted to members, their 
families, out of town guests, and their 
partners not including undergraduates 
of the College. 



FOOTBALL RETURNS 

Telegraphic returns of the Penn State- 
Syracuse football game will give the 
play by play account of the game next 
Saturday. The returns will be held in 
the Auditorium, starting at two o'clock. 
While the varsity is away, the Penn 
State Freshmen will play the West 
Virginia Freshmen on New Beaver 
Field. 



CALENDAR 



WEDNESDAY, October 25 

Scholarship Day, Auditorium, 7:30 p. m. 
THURSDAY, Ooctober 26 
Liberal Arts Faculty meeting, room 
25, L. A., 4:30. 

FRIDAY, October 27 
Hallowe'en dinner dance at University 
Club. 

SATURDAY, October 28 

Football returns, Penn State — Syra- 
cuse, Auditorium, 2:00. 
Club night at University Club. 

SUNDAY, October 29 

Chapel Speaker — The Reverend Dr. 
Andrew Mutch, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

SCHOLARSHIP DAY 

The first observance of Scholarship 
Day will take place in the Auditorium 
tomorrow night at 7:30 p. m. Dr. 
Arthur Holmes, president of Drake 
University and formerly Dean of the 
General Faculty at Penn State, will be 
the speaker, while the program will 
include the presentation of marksman- 
ship medals, the announcement of the 
awards of the John W. White and the 
Louise Carnegie Scholarships, an- 
nouncements of the elections to the 
various honor s >cieties, and the pre- 
sentation of scholarship medals. Mrs. 
Grant will render several organ selec- 
tions. 

iSince the Faculty has expressed a 
desire to emphasize scholarship, the 
principal side of student life, it is hoped 
that all members of the Faculty who 
are in town will make an earnest effort 
to attend the exercises. Members of 
the various honor societies are request- 
ed to assemble in the Foyer of the 
Auditorium at 7:15, from which place 
they will proceed in a body to the seats 
reserved for them in the front and 
center of the house. 



AMERICAN ASSOCIATION 

OF UNIVERSITY PROFESSORS 

A meeting of the local chapter of the 
American Association of University 
Professors will be held on Thursday 
evening, November second, at 7:30 p. 
m., in Engineering A. The subject of 
the meeting will be the report on the 
recommendations of the national asso- 
ciation. — J. Ben Hill, secretary. 



STUDENT DRIECTORY 

Any member of the teaching staff 
may obtain a copy of the Student Di- 
rectory for 1922-23 by calling at the of- 
fice of his Dean after 12:00 noon Thurs- 
day. These directories cannot be 
obtained at the Registrar's Office, 






- 



II 



: ' 















Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 






Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 2 



State College, Pa., October 31, 1922 



NUMBER 8 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

SENATE MEETING DATES 

The November meeting of the College 
Senate will be held on Thursday even- 
ing, November 16, and the December 
meeting on Thursday evening, Decem- 
ber 14. 



-!0~ 



BELOW GRADE REPORTS 

Members of the teaching staff should 
note that "below grade" reports for the 
present semester are due on Wednes- 
day, November S. 

10 

WOMEN'S BELOW GRADES 

Will instructors kindly send a copy 
of "below grades" of all women stu- 
dents to the Dean of Women? The p ar- 
ticipation of women in campus activi- 
ties is determined by their scholastic 
standing; it is therefore necessary that 
these grades be received as promptly 
as possible. — Margaret A. Knight 

STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 

Juniors 

Burdan, Charlie Creto, Jr., ME. 
Jadwin, Robert Baker, ME. 

Sophomore 

Wilson, Donna Marie, EP. 
Freshmen 

Beck, Nathaniel, PL, 
Bricmson, Charles William, Ag. 
Faust, Beaver Stanley, PM. 
Kuebler, William Edward, Ch. 
Tripp, Charles Reed, A.Ed. 

1st. Year Two-Year Ag. 

Klein, Adolph R. 



HELPING THE CAMPAPIGN 

An excellent example of faculty as- 
sistance in the campaign is the work of 
Dr. David A. Anderson of the education 
department, who, as an institute lectur- 
er in Cambria county last week pre- 
sented the Penn State story and secured 
a very favorable resolution of support 
from the 838 teachers assembled there. 

Not only this, but the teachers staged 
a campaign that will net a tidy sum for 
the 12,000,000 fund and they guarantee 
100 per cent participation. The idea 
originated with Dr. Anderson and co- 
operation came from John C. Cosgrove, 
campaign chairman in Cambria county. 
As a result, other institutes will be giv- 
en an opportunity to join the movement 
in the next few weeks. 



SENATE COMMITTEES 

The following are the standing com- 
mittees of the. College Senate for the 
present college year : 

ON ADMISSION: Professor Espen- 
shade, chairman ; Professors Bressler, 
Dengler, and C. L. Harris. 

ON ATHLETICS: Professor Tom- 
have, chairman; Professors Bezdek, 
Ham, Shattuck, and Welty. 

ON STUDENT WELFARE: Doctor 
Fletcher, chairman; Deans Warnock 
and Knight; Professors Dusham and 
Simmons. 

ON PUBLICATIONS: D. M. Cress- 
well, chairman; Professors Blasingame, 
Dye, O. A. Knight and Kocher. 

ON ACADEMIC STANDARDS: Pro- 
fessor Walker, chairman; Professors 
Ferguson, McFarland, A. E. Martin, 
and Wood. 

On [COURSES OF STUDY: Dean 
Stoddart, chairman; Professors Fergu- 
son, McFarland, A. E. Martin, and 
Wood. 

ON RESEARCH: Dean Kern, chair- 
man; Professors Boucke, Dutcher, For- 
bes, and Holbrook. 



CALENDAR 



DEAN HOLBROOK HERE 

1L'. A Holbrook, the new Dean of the 
School of Mines, has begun his work 
here. Dean Holbrook was appointed 
with the expectation that he would be 
at the School commencing October 1 , 
About that time, however, he underwent 
an operation for appendicitis, and con- 
sequently his arrival has been delayed 
until the present. His office is Room 
202 New Mining Building. 



101 CHANGE COURSES 

For the information of the teaching 
staff, the Registrar reports that 101 
students have changed their courses 
from one school to another at the be- 
ginning of the first semester, as com- 
pared with 84 similar changes of course 
reported one year ago. 

The following tabulation indicates 
each School's gain or loss in number: 

FromAgr. IS; to Agr. 7; Loss 11 
From Eng. 43; to Eng. 6; Loss 37 
From H.Ec-o. 3 ; to H.Eco. 3 ; No change 
From Mines 9 ; to Mines 3 ; Loss 6 
From N.Sci. 19; to N.Sci. 13; Loss 6 
From L.Arts 9; to L.Arts 69; Gain 60 

Of those who have changed to the 
School of Liberl Arts, 49 hve indicated 
their intention of taking the Commerce 
and Finance course. 



WEDNESDAY, November 1 

Hun. Fred Rasmussen, State Secre- 
tary of Agriculture, will address the 
Agricultural Freshmen on Wednesday. 
November 8, at 9: 20 a. m., in Old 
Chapel. Visitors are welcome and are 
requested to occupy seats in the Bal- 
cony. 

FRIDAY, November 3 

The football team plays the Navy at 
Washington un this date. No classes 
will be dismissed on Friday afternoon 
ior the telegraphic returns if such are 
provided in the Auditorium. 

SATURDAY, November i 

Football, Freshmen vs. University of 
Pittsburgh Freshmen, time and field to 
be announced later. 

Byron G. Harlan, comedian, will give 
an entertainment in the Auditorium in 
the evening for the benefit of the girls' 
campaign. 

SUNDAY", November 5 

Chapel speaker — The Rev. Dr. Lewis 
S. Mudge, of Philadelphia, Stated Clerk 
of the General Assembly of the Pres- 
byterian Church. 



THE CAMPAIGN 



The $2,000,000 emergency building 
fund campaign total reached .$650,000 or 
approximately one third of the goal, 
yesterday, at the end of the fourth 
week of the alumni drive. It was re- 
ported that Cambria county had not 
only gone over the top in its $38,000 
quota, but was more than $10,000 over- 
subscribed. Adams county reached 100 
per cent in its $8000 quota on Saturday 
and Centre county stands third with 
86 per cent. 

President Thomas spoke at the alum- 
ni dinner in New York last Friday even- 
ing, and the campaign among the many 
alumni there received a good start. He 
also spoke to the Philadelphia alumni 
last night and it is expected that the 
drive in that county will be under 
way very soon. 



NEW CLUB ROOM 

The corner room in the basement of 
the University Club has been reflnished 
and henceforth will be known as the 
Club Room. It may be rented for after- 
noon usage by parties sponsored by 
club members or their wives, for a fee 
of $4. Arrangements for refreshments 
may be made with the steward. Even- 
ing usage of this room will be restricted 
to club members only. 



W. P. CROCKETT , 
3 13 MAIN BLPG. 



.. > . . .ah 



.,.:■.: I I } < -It, 

,,..1, 






Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty 



sylvama Mate 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 2 



State College, Pa., November 7, 1922 



NUMBER 9 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

A CORRECTION 
In the announcement icf Senate Com- 
mittees in last week's Bulletin, the 
make-up of the Committee on Academic 
Standards was set-up wrong by the 
printer. This committee is composed of 
the following members of the Senate: 
Professor Walker, chairman; Profes- 
sors Gardner, D. A. Anderson, and 
Marquardt, College Examiner. 



BELOW GRADE REPORTS 

Members of the teaching staff should 
note that "below grade" reports for the 
present semester are due on Wednes- 
day, November 8. 



WOMEN'S BELOW GRADES 
Dean Knight requests that all mem- 
bers of the teaching staff send a copy 
of "below grades" of all women stu- 
dents to her office as promptly as pos- 
sible, as the participation of women 
students in dompus activities is deter- 
mined by their scholastic standing. 



REGISTRAR'S HOURS 
Professor A. H. Espenshade, the Col- 
lege Registrar, has undertaken to super- 
vise the activities at the Campaign 
Headquarters. Until further notice, he 
will hbld an office hour from four to 
five o'clock daily for callers at the Reg- 
istrar's Office. 



LIBERAL ARTS FACULTY 
The regular meeting of the Liberal 
Arts Faculty will be omitted on No- 
vember 8. The Faculty will meet at 
the call of the Dean, at a later date. — 
L. V. T. Simmons, secretary. 
o 

STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
students have left college : 
Sophomore 
Glenn, Elizabeth Meek, HE 

Freshman 

Fleming, Howard Moffatt, iCE 

Special 
Henricksen, Ingolf L., Hrt 



AG. EXTENSION 
The regular monthly meeting of the 
Agricultural Extension staff; will be 
held on Monday, November 13, at 10:00 
a. m., in the Director's office. — M. S. 
McDowell, director. 



CARNEGIE TECH TICKETS 

Faculty tickets for the Carnegie 

Tech football game on Saturday will 

I be distributed >in the usulal fashion 

I through the offices of the deans of the 

different schools. This will be event 

number 10 in the coupon book. 



FACULTY CAMPAIGNERS 

Recently certain members of the Fac- 
ulty have shown a commendable inter- 
est in the progress of the Campign by 
offering their services. During the 
past week Professor W. V. Dennis spoke 
before the Elk County Teachers' In- 
stitute at Ridgway; Dr. D. A. Ander- 
son addressed the Institute at Hunting- 
don; Dean Chambers covered the in- 
stitutes in both Bucks and Delaware 
Counties. Dean Stoddart responded to 
a similar "hurry-up" call in Tioga Coun- 
ty. Dr. Anderson has been placed in 
charge of the County Institute work 
that the College has undertaken in the 
interests of the Campaign. This has 
been an outgrowth of the very excellent 
movement that Dr. Anderson started at 
Johnstown, where he secured a 100 per 
cent participation and about $1500 in 
pledges from the teachers or Cambria 
County. 

Profesor D. D. Mas'on is giving all 
his spare time to the assistance of Pro- 
Lessor Espenshade in the office work at 
Headquarters. 

Professor F. L. Pattee has written a 
stimulating personal letter that will be 
tent out to 9,000 alumni. 

Mr. H. W. Popp, of the Botany De- 
partment, has materially assisted in the 
organization of Clinton County, and 
Dean Kern has rendered a similar ser- 
vice in Huntingdon County. 

Dr. Fletcher has helped to reorganize 
the lagging work in York and Franklin 
counties. 

Professor J. O. Keller has devoted 
several days to the actual canvass for 
subscriptions in his home town of Belle- 
fonte. 

Others have offered their services, and 
are going to work. What can you do. 
and when will you begin? Your sugges- 
tions and help are welcome at Head- 
quarters. 

o 

AG. FACULTY 

The annual Agricultural Faculty get- 
together will be held Monday evening, 
November 13, at 7:30 in the Stock 
Judging Pavilion. Old clothes will be 
in order, games will be played, and 
light refreshments will be served. 

o 

AGRICULTURAL LECTURE 

Mr. L. H. Dennis, Director of the 
Bureau of Vocational Education of the 
State Department of Public Instruction, 
will address the Agricultural Freshmen 
onWednesday, November 15, at 9: 20 a. 
m., in Old Chapel. Visitors are welcome 
and are requested to occupy seats in the 
balcony. 

o 

NEW COUNTY LIST 
The Registrar has just compiled a 
new "county list" lof students. The 
names are arranged alphabetically ac- 
cording to counties and classes. Mem- 
bers of the Faculty may consult this 
list at any time toy calling at the Reg- 
istrar's Office. 



CALENDAR 

FRIDAY, November 10 

Card party at the University Club. 

SATURDAY, November 11 

Pennsylvania Day. Military pro- 
gram in morning. Football, Penn 
.-Juu.e Freshmen vs. Syracuse Fresh- 
men, 10:00 a. m. Penn State vs. Car- 
negie Tech, New Beaver, 2:00. Glee 
Club concert, Auditorium, 7:15. 

SUNDAY, November 12 

Chapel speaker — The Reverend Dr. 
William L. Sawtelle, Scranton, Pa. 

COLLEGE MEAT AVAILABLE 

The Department of Animal Husband- 
ry will have some high class meat for 
sale in connection with the instruction- 
al work in A. H. 17 and 217. The meat 
conies from carcasses secured from an- 
imals fed in the department and is of 
ihe highest quality. Arrangements have 
been made to sell it to members of the 
faculty at the following hours when 
college is in session: Monday, 2: 30 to 
4: 30; Tuesday, 8: 30 to 10: 30, 2: 30 
to 4: 30; Thursday, 8: 30 to 10: 30, 2: 30 
to 4: 30; Friday, 2: 30 to 4: 30; Sat- 
urday, 11: 30 to 12: 00. 

The class room is located in the base- 
ment of the Stock Judging Pavilion 
where the meat can be secured. De- 
livery cannot be made except where 
wholesale cuts are purchased. 

Present scale of prices: Lamb — leg. 
36c per pound; loin, 34c; rib, 30c; 
shoulder, 25c; plate, 18c. Beef — port- 
erhouse, 35c; sirloin. 32c; round and 
rump, 28c; rib, 25c; chuck, 22c; plate, 
14c; shoulder, 18c (boiling or potroast). 



UNIVERSITY CLUB 

An informal card party for club mem- 
bers, wives and partners will be held at 
the club on Friday night of this week. 
Refreshments will be fifty cents a 
plate. Reservations stating what game 
it is desired to play should be made 
with Mr. Clayton before Wednesday, 
November 8. Faculty members may 
still attend the various fraternity danc- 
es after the card party. 

It is requesed that members return 
all borrowed cards to the club before 
Friday. 



NEW SPANISH CLUB 

A new Spanish Club called "Circulo 
de los Amigos de la Lengua Espanola" 
will have its first meeting Wednesday 
evening, November 8, at 7: 30 in room 
314 Old Main. The club is under the 
direction of ProfessTor J. Martinez, who 
has arranged a varied program. Any 
one interested in Spanish is cordially 
invited to attend. 



i 3 •'-: ' A I :; 









:■■ , • i 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 




Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 2 



State College, Pa., November 14, 1922 



NUMBER 10 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



ENGINEERING FACULTY 
There will be a meeting of the Fac- 
llty of the School of Engineering on 
Monday, November 20th, at 4:30 p. m. 
n room 200, Engineering D. — R. L. 
Sackett, Dean. 

o 

OFFICIAL BULLETIN NOTICES 

In order to aid the editor of the Fac- 
ulty Bulletin in determining just what 
lotices are official, the Council of Ad- 
ministration took the following action 
it its last meeting. "It is agreed that 
jfiicial notices for the Faculty Bulletin 
;hall come only from the general College 
ldministrative offices, Deans' offices and 
iecretaries of School Faculties." 

It will still further help the editor if 
terns for the "Official Notice" column 
se so designated. 



COUNCIL ACTION 



At the last meeting of the Council of 
Administration the following action was 
haken: Instructors! are requested to 
flismiss classes promptly at the close of 
bach period. If this is not done, prompt 
littendance at the succeeding class is 
j-endered more or less impossible. If 

he College bell cannot be heard, classes 
i;hould be run by the instructor's watch 

which can be set by the College clock. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 
Junior 
Mower, Charles E., PL 

Sophomores 
Curry, Catherine Loomis, EP 
Gross, Benjamin, PL 
jFres'Iiman 
Beers, Frank Lee, Ag 
Two-Year Ag 
Ellenberger, George J., 2nd yr. 

Special 
Burris, Robert Eugene, M1E 
Announcement previously made that 
the following students had left college 
was incorrect: Sophomore, Glenn, Eliza- 
beth Meek, HE, and Junior, Shultz, 
Ernest RusseH, CE. They are both 
still in college. This should have been: 

Special 

Glenn, Elizabeth Turner, HE 

Sophomore 
Shultz, Earl Raymond, PM 

BANQUET FACILITIES 

The University Club has announced 
that it is able and willing to handle 
banquets in the several dining rooms of 
the club, and student and faculty groups 
may arrange for as many such gath- 
erings as the -club is able to accommo- 
date without interfering with the mem- 
bers living in the club-house. The use 
of the dining room is restricted to ban- 
quets, however, and dancing will not 
be allowed after the banquet. 



FACULTY MEMBERS TO 

SPEED UP CAMPAIGN 

Following up the announcement of 
last week which discussed the important 
parts that members of the Faculty are 
playing in the Emergency Building 
Fund Campaign, it was announced from 
headquarters on Saturday that a "Fly- 
ing Squadron" of Faculty members 
would swing into action this week to 
speed up the campaign efforts in every 
county of the state. 

Pres:dent John M. Thomas and IS 
other members of the Faculty make up 
the visiting delegation. Their plan of 
action is to take up one county at a 
time, survey the situation with the 
County Chairmen, and then dig in and 
put spurs to any lagging efforts that may 
be encountered. Dr. Thomas will tack- 
le the two largest counties, Allegheny 
and Philadelphia, and will be assisted 
in his efforts by Dean Stoddart. 

The other Faculty members who will 
take the road for Penn State this week 
are: F. P. Weaver, H. C. Knandel, Dean 
Kern, Dean Watts, S. W. Fletcher, Ma- 
jor Welty, G. R. Green, D. F. McFar- 
land, IT. H. Havner, F. M. Torrence, D. 
A. Anderson, A. A. Borland, C. L. Good- 
ling, E. K. Hibshman, J. O. Keller, J. 
M. McKee, and H. W. Popp. 

The big thermometer on the front 
of Old Main has gone over the $700, 00« 
mark but progres is not as rapid as 
it should be, and it is largely on this ac- 
count that the "Flying Squadron" from 
the Faculty is being sent to apply the 
accelerator to the slow-moving machin- 
ery in the various counties. 



CALENDAR 

TUESDAY, November 14 
Art Lecture, 4:30 p. m., Old Chapel 
WEDNESDAY, November 15 

Lecture to Agricultural Freshmen, Old 
Chapel, 9:20 a. m. Visitors welcome 
and are requested to occupy seats in 
the balcony. 

THi'RSDAY, November 16 

Agricultural Research Staff meets 3:30 

p. m., 103 Ag. Building. 
Agricultural Faculty meets, 4:30 p. m., 

in 103 Ag. Building. 

FRIDAY, November 17 

Penn State Piayers at the University 
Club. 

SATURDAY, November 18 

Soccer. Penn State vs. Haverford, New 

Beaver, 1:00 p. m. 
Telegraphic returns, Penn State — Penn 
football game. Auditorium, 2:00 p. m. 
Smoker at the University Club. 
SUNDAY, November 19 
Chape! Speaker — The Honorable Frank- 
lin Spencer Edmonds, of Philadelphia. 
MONDAY, November 20 
Engineering Faculty meeting, 4:30, 
room 200, Engineering D. 



WINTER SCHEDULE FOR 

SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 

The following is a tentative schedule 
of events for the coming winter which 
concern the School of Agriculture: 

December 18-21 — Farmers' Week, be- 
ginning with Monday evening meeting 
and closing Thursday at noon. 

January 4 to February 28 — Winter 
Short Courses. 

January 12-21 — Agricultural Exten- 
sion Conference. (Opening date sub- 
ject to change.) 

January 22-27 — State Farm Products 
Show at Harrisburg. 

-o 

SENIOR GEOLOGY TRIP 

The class of Senior mining geologists 
recently completed a five-day field and 
inspection trip under the direction of 
Professor C. A. Bonine. In addition to 
studying the geology of southeastern 
Pennsylvania and parts of Maryland 
and Delaware, the party visited chro- 
mite, iron, kaolin, and feldspar mines. 
Rock, mineral, and fossil specimens 
were collected and shipped to the School 
of Mines. The U. S. National Museum 
at Washington, D. C. was also visited. 



UNIVERSITY CLUB 

The Penn State Players will be the 
attraction at the University Club on 
Friday night of this week. Dancing 
and cards wiil follow the plays. Club 
members and patrons. A smoker will 
be held on Saturday night, with a mu- 
sical program also arranged. 
o 

ART LECTURE 

"Art as a Profession for Women" is 
the subject of a lecture to be given 
today (Tuesday) at 4:30 p. m. in the 
Old Chapel, by C. Valentine Kirby, Di- 
rector of Art for the State Department 
of Public Instruction. All interested 
are invited to attend. 

■ o 

JEWISH STUDENTS 

Mr. E. W. Weitzenkorn, vice-president 
of the Menorah Society, has recently 
made, with the help of the Registrar, a 
most painstaking study of the number 
of Jewish students now in College. 

This canvass of the subject shows 
that there are registered now at Penn 
State 87 Jews, who are classified as 
follows: Seniors, 15; Juniors, 21; Soph- 
omores, 18; Freshmen, 32; and Two- 
Year Agricultural, 1. 



WINTER FARMERS' WEEK 
Programs for the 17th annual Win- 
ter Farmers' Week to be held here De- 
cember 18, 19, 20, and 21, will be ready 
for distribution next week. The winter 
courses in Agriculture will begin Jan- 
uary 4 and continue until March 3, 1923. 



W ,D. CROCKETT, 
3 13 MAIN B L D G . 






; 






.■ 

w 

1 i i (hi him ,rlu 



. 



i ,rf 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State Coll 



e£?e Contributions must be as 

brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor. 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 2 



State College, Pa., November 21, 1922 



NUMBER 11 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



AN APPEAL F It 

CAMPAIGN WOKltEES 

A study of our faculty list shows 
that it contains the names of 146 
men and women holding degrees 
from The Pennsylvania State Col- 
lege. These graduates of the Col- 
lege come from 46 different coun- 
ties in Pennsylvania. In nearly 
all these counties the eampa.gn 
work lags and suffers from lack 
of canvassers, who are w.lling 
and able to do the hard work of 
securing pledges. 

Graduates of Penn State, your 
College needs you f r this work 
during the Christmas vacation. 
"The harvest indeed is plenteous, 
but the laborers are few." The 
Campaign Office needs your help 
in gathering in the pledges. 

Please volunteer by reporting 
at once to Headquarters for in- 
structions and assignment. This 
campaign is being conducted for 
your College. 



CHANGES IN FEES 

All pnsposed changes in practicum 
ees which are connected with the re- 
ommended curriculum and course 
hanges recently submitted to the Sen. 
te must be in the Comptroller's hands 
ot later than December 1, to give ani- 
le time for consideration and action 
y the Board of Trustees at the Janu- 
ry meeting. — R. H. Smith, Comptorller. 



STUDECNTS WITHRAW 

During the past week the following 
■tudents have left college: 

Sophomores 

McClure, Harold Dealion, CF 
'Musses, Henry Clay, CF 



; E T T E It FROM A 

FACULTY CAMPAIGNER 

In order that members of the Faculty 

ia.y know just what kind of work their 
oileagues are doing for the Campaign, 
'e print (without permission) the fol- 
ding letter from Dr. D. F. McFar- 
md: 

Smethport, Pa., Nov. 13, 1922. 

"I spent the night at Port Allegheny 

nd got in touch with John B , 

ne of the two Penn State graduates 
lere. I found that he had done noth- 
l S, — not even made out his own sub- 
;ription. I arranged to go back there 
hursday, get the two Alumni subscrip- 
ons, and canvass some of the wealthier 
ien in the town. 

I got in «onference with Mr. Ger- 
an here this afternoon. He is a live 



wire. Together we secured subscrip- 
tions from the only two Alumni here 
who had not already subscribed. 

" I am going to Bradford tonight, 
and will work there tomorrow. I will 
return here Wednesday, and will go 
with Mr. German and Mr. Crossman, 
the County Agent, to call on the bank- 
ers and other influential men." 

It now looks as if there will remain 
plenty of work of this kind to be done 
during the Christmas vacation by other 
volunteers from the Faculty, especially 
by the 146 Penn State men. Why not 
begin now to prepare yourselves for 
this service to your College? 



FACULTY CAMPAIG NERS 

The list of Faculty campaign work- 
ers increases daily. One gratifying fea- 
ture is the helpful activity of Faculty 
members who are not Penn State grad- 
uates. A partial list of these "outsid- 
ers" contains the following names: 

Dean Sackett, Dean Kern. Dean Siod- 
dart, Dean Knight, Dean Chambers, 
E. L. Nixon, S. W. Fletcher, F. L. 
Pattee, A. H. Espenshade, S. K. Host- 
etter, Miss Chace, D. A. Anderson, H. C. 
Knandel, G. R. Green, D. F. McFarland 
Major Welty, R. U. Blasingame. and F. 
N. Fagan. 

Here is a corresponding list of some 
campaign workers who hold degrees 
from Penn State: 

Dean Watts, M. S. McDowell, F. P. 
Weaver. H. H. Havner. F. M. Torrence. 
J. O. Keller, A. A. Borland, C. L. Gond- 
ling, H. W. Popp, J. M. McKee, E. B. 
Stavely, E. K. Hibshman, E. N. Sulli- 
van. D. D. Mason, R. H. Smith. 

Many of the persons on both lists are 
actively at work securing subscriptions. 
The. ultimate success of the Campaign 
requires the active participation of 
every one who is willing and able to 
lend a hand. 

The Campaign Headquarters office 
is eager to make additions to the last 
of active Faculty members, particularly 
from among the 146 Penn State gradu- 
ates in our Faculty, who should real- 
ize that this is their campaign, and that 
it is being conducted for their College. 

Volunteers for this good work should 
report at once to Campaign Headquar- 
ters. 



UNIVERSITY CLUB 

The University Club will hold its 
weekly smoker on Saturday night of 
this week. On Thanksgiving there will 
be a formal dinner and dance at the 
club, reservations for which must be 
made with Mr. Clayton not later than 
Monday, November 27. The children of 
club members will be welcome for din- 
ner. 



CALENDAR 

FRIDAY, November 24 

Penn State Players, Auditorium, 8:15. 
SATURDAY, November 25 

Smoker at University Club. 

SUNDAY, November 20 

Chapel Speaker — The Reverend Dr. Ed- 
win Heyl Delk, of St. Matthews Lu- 
theran Church, Philadelphia. 

THURSDAY, December 11 

C liege Senate, ^30 p. m.. Foyer of 
Auditorium. 

EIGHTEEN CITIES SUPPLY 

ill; STUDENTS AT STATE 

The following tabulation indicates 
the number of regular college students 
now in attendance at The Pennsylvania 
State College from the eighteen largest 
cities in the state arranged in the order 
of their population according to the Cen- 
sus of 1920. 

It should be noted that in this study, 
Pittsburgh is made to include the pop- 
ulous boroughs of Aspinwall, Avalon, 
Bellevue, Ben A^>«. Crafton, Edge- 
wood, Millvale, Oakmont, Sharpsburg, 
Swissvale, and Wilkinsburg, since all 
of these municipalities, constituting a 
sort of "Greater Pitsburgh", are now 
served by the Pittsburgh post office. 

These eighteen cities, with a total 
populaion of 3,557,504, (or 40.8 per cent 
of the population of the entire state) 
send 947 students to Penn State, or 
29.1 per cent of our present student 
body. These figures were compiled y 
the Registrar of the College. 



City 
Philadelphia 
Pittsburgh 
Scranton 
Reading 
Erie 

Harrisburg 
Wilkes-Barre 
Allentown 
Johnstown 
Altoona 
Chester 
Lancaster 
Bethlehem 
York 

McKeesport 
New Castle 
Williamsport 

Total 



Students Population 
239 1,823,779 



221 


673,096 


60 


137,783 


30 


107,784 


29 


93,372 


71 


75,917 


37 


73,833 


24 


73,502 


42 


67,327 


47 


60,331 


3 


58,030 


16 


53,150 


12 


50.35S 


37 


47,512 


15 


46,781 


14 


44.93S 


35 


36,198 


947 


3,557,504 



The Penn State Players will pre- 
sent J. M. Barrie's comedy, "AMce-Sit- 
By-The-Fire", on Friday evening at 
8:15 in the Auditorium. Tickets will 
be on sale at Metzger's on Wednesday 
evening at 6:30. 



■- ; ' n r k o r v ~ t t 



1 2 y AIM BID Q 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, a! id reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bull jtin Edi- 
tor. 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 2 



State College, Pa., November 28, 1922 



NUMBER 12 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

THANKSGIVING 

All regular college exercises will be 
Suspended on Thursday of this week 
which is Thanksgiving Day. Classes 
will resume at the first hour on Friday 
morning. Since this is not considered a 
vacation period there will be no fine 
attached to absence before or after 
Thursday. However the Dean of Men 
and the Dean of Women are issuing 
excuses only in emergency cases and 
"cuts" should be treated by the instruc- 
tor just as any other unexcused absenc- 
es. 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 

Will each School and Department 
carefully examine the report of the 
Committee on Courses of Study and no- 
tify the chairman of any errors in 
transcribing the material previously 
submitted? Since this report, present- 
ed at the November meeting of the 
Senate, will not be acted upon until 
the December meeting in order to al- 
low for final corrections, will each 
School and Department notify the chair- 
man of any changes that are necessary? 
Each Senate member is supposed to 
have a copy of the report. There are 
a few extra copies for those who failed 
to receive them. — C. W. iStoddart, Chair- 
man. 



FINAL EXAMINATIONS 

At a meeting of the College Senate 
held on November 16, the following mo- 
tion was adopted: "That henceforth 
two hours be devoted to a final exam- 
ination, and that the Assistant Regis, 
trar be authorized to schedule three 
final examinations on one day." 

The final examinations will probably 
be scheduled as follows: 8:00 to 10:00 
a. m.; 10:20 to 12:20; and 2:00 to 4:00 
p. m. 

The final examination schedule will 
appear shortly. The examination per- 
iod will be the week of January 22, 
1923.— W. S. Hoffman, Asst. Registrar. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 
Sophomore 
Weiss, Harold Erb, IE 

Two Year Ag. 
JVannemacher, Roland Harold, 1st yr. 



AG. EXTENSION 

The regular monthly meeting of the 
Agricultural Extension staff will be 
held on Monday, December 4, at 10:00 
a. m. in the Director's Office.— M. S. 
McDowell, Director. 



FACULTY AND STUDENTS 

TO SELL PENN STATE 

With the Christmas holiday period 
as the time and every Pennsylvania 
county as the place, Penn State Faculty 
members and students are going to enter 
the lists to carry the Emergency Biuld- 
ing Fund Campaign to a successful con- 
clusion. Just as State College has car- 
ried Centre County to the forefront 
among the counties in the total amount 
pledged, a volunteer army from State 
College must spur the lagging efforts 
in other counties and win success for 
Penn State. 

A large number of Faculty members 
■and students have already volunteered 
for service as canvassers in their home 
counties during the Christmas vaca- 
tion. Many more volunteers are need- 
ed. The Student slogan has been set 
as "One Thousand .Student Workers 
for Penn State to Bring Back One 
Thousand Dollars Each." All Faculty 
members but particularly those who are 
graduates of Penn State, are asked 
to give their help. 

In order to train those who volunteer 
for canvassing during the holidays 1 , 
arrangements have been made for the 
holding of three general mass meet- 
ings for Faculty members and students. 
This "School for Canvassers" will open 
on Monday evening, December 4, in 
the Auditorium, the meeting being 
scheduled from seven to eight o'clock. 
President G. B. Lane, of the Student 
Council, will be in carge of this open- 
ing meeting, and the chief speaker will 
be John C. Cosgrove, of Johnstown, a 
member of the Board of Trustees who 
as chairman of Cambria County has 
not only raised his full quota but has 
already gone over the top by more than 
twenty percent. Mr. Cosgrove will ex- 
plain how the job was put across in 
Cambria County. 

Short talks will also be given by- 
Dean C. W. Stoddart, Professor H. C. 
Knandel, and President Lane. All of 
the necessary campaign material will 
be given out at this meeting and there 
will be a display of all campaign lit- 
erature to date. 

The second meeting will be held on 
Tuesday evening, December 5, at the 
same time and place. This will be a 
Salesmanship Meeting, and Dean F. D. 
Kern, Professors, T. C. Pakenham, J. 
E. DeCamp and J. O. Keller will give 
final instructions to all volunteer can- 
vassers as to the best methods of ap- 
proach, how to solicit, and in short, 
how to "sell Penn State." Any need- 
ed information can be obtained at this 
meeting. 

The third meeting will take place on 
Friday evening, December 8, in the 
Auditorium at seven o'clock, when 
President Thomas w r ill talk on "How 
Penn State Students Can Help." This 
will also apply to Faculty volunteers. 



CALENDAR 

THURSDAY, November 30 

Thanksgiving Day. No classes. 
Dinner dance at University Club. 
SATURDAY, December 2 

Smoker at University Club. 
SUNDAY, December 3 

No Chapel Speaker. There will be a 
musical program at the chapel exer. 
cises. 

MONDAY, December 4 

Agricultural Extesion staff meets, 
10:00 a. m. 

"School for Canvassers" opens with 
general mass meeting, Auditorium 7:00 
p. m. 

THURSDAY, December II 

College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Audi- 
torium. 



All who are willing to help the Cam- 
paign should volunteer for this service 
in their home communities during the 
Christmas vacation and should turn 
out for this series of meetings. The 
Campaign is at a critical stage, and 
Penn iState Faculty members and stu- 
dents have a glorious chance to bring 
it to a successful climax. 



UNIVERSITY CLUB 

University Club members and their 
families will gather at the club-house 
on Thursday evening for their annual 
Thanksgiving dinner and dance. There 
will also be a smoker on Saturday night 
of tbis week. 



A. A. A. S. 

Members of the American Associa- 
tion fcr the Advancement of Science 
located in State College may pay their 
1923 annual dues to the local branch. 
Mr. A. H. Dewey, of the Geology De- 
partment, is treasurer of the local 
branch of the association. — J. Ben Hill, 
Secretary. 



Ohio State Alumni of State College 
will hold their annual dinner at the 
University Club on December 8. Any 
Ohio State graduates who are new on 
the campus are asked to communicate 
with Dean Margaret A. Knight. 



Dr. H. M. Battenhouse, of the De- 
partment of English, was in Harris- 
burg recently to address a meeting on 
behalf of the Emergency Building Fund 
Campaign. 



— o- 



The Vocational Advisement Confer- 
ence for girls will be held December 
5, 6, and 7. Miss Helen M. Bennett, of the 
Chicago Collegiate Bureau of Occupa- 
tions will be leader of the conference. 



:;.P- -•■ 



>C VV.E.T" 7 



3 1 3 



, M :i BLDG 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor. 175 Alain Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



/OLUME 2 



State College, Pa., December 5, 1922 



NUMBER 13 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

THE ENLISTMENT OF 

FACULTY CAMPAIGNERS 

Within the past week or more many 
members of the Faculty have visited 
Campaign Headquarters and have signi- 
fied their intention of soliciting sub- 
scriptions during the Christmas vaca- 
tion in their home towns or elsewhere. 
This response to the call for workers 
has been most gratifying. 

At the office of every Dean and at 
Campaign Headquarters will be found 
"enlistment cards", such as hundreds of 
students are now signing. Members 
>f the Faculty are also asked to sign 
these cards indicating under their sig- 
nature in just what county, city, or lo- 
cality they expect to work. Signed cards 
should be sent directly to Headquarters 
in the "manilla mail". 
' The President of the College, many 
Deans and heads of departments, in- 
structors, and office assistants have 
already enlisted by signing one of these 
sards. Workers, workers, always more 
WORKERS,— this is the one thing the 

ampaign now needs to make it quickly 
md surely successful. The Campaign 
leeds YOU for this work, particularly 
n your home community. 

Campaign Headquarters is not at lib- 
rty to promise the payment of expens- 
s except by special arrangement with 
he Comptroller. 

A "Salesmanship Meeting" will be 
leld in the Auditorium this evening 
Tuesday) at seven o'clock and all 
vorkers should attend. They should 
dso attend the final meeting in the 
Auditorium on Friday evening at seven 
'clock when President Thomas will 
peak. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
tudents have left college: 

Juniors 

ftml, Edward William, ME 
toberts, Abel R., ME 

Sophomore 
'ischer, Harold Edwin, CE 

Freshmen 
ennett, Byron Stone, EE 
>ulany, Glenn Alsymes, EE 



UNIVERSITY CLUB 

Club night will be held on Saturday 
/ening. The annual Christmas Revels 
ill take place on Wednesday evening, 
'ecember 13 and the attention of mem- 
3rs is again called to the revised in- 
rpretation of the House Rules con- 
Tning this occasion. This provides 
lat "Christmas Revels are restricted 
members, their families, their part- 
y's, not including undergraduates of 
e College, and out of town guests." 



THE SCHOOL LUNCH 

Those who are not patronizing the 
School Lunch which is conducted on the 
first four days of the week at 12:15 
in the Women's Building aire missing a 
treat, 'tis said. The food is reported to 
be of the "kind that Mother makes" and 
there is always sufficient variety each 
day and during the week to make it in- 
teresting. There are usually served a 
soup, two hot dishes, a salad, a dessert, 
sandwiches, and several beverages, so 
that it is possible to choose a light or 
heavy meal. 

The purpose in serving the lunch is 
to furnish practice for the Senior stu- 
dents in Home Economics who are pre- 
paring to teach, since most of them will 
have to manage such lunches in the 
schools to which they will go. For this 
reason, the food can be served practi- 
cally at cost. On account of the limited 
equipment and lack of room compara- 
tively few people can be accommodated 
so it is a case of go early and avoid the 
rush. 



A. A. A. S. 

The program committee of the State 
College Branch of the American Asso- 
ciation for the Ad\ aM-ement of Science 
has arranged to have Dr. W. A. Orton, 
from the Bureau of Plant Industry, 
Washington, D. C, address the meet ng 
which will follow the annual dinner at 
the University Club on Tuesday even- 
ing, December 12. His subject will be a 
discussion of "the newer knowledge of 
the properties of plants important in 
special diets; the necessity of introduc- 
ing and disseminating additions to our 
list of vegetables and of providing an 
all-the-year supply. 

The dinner will be at G:30 and Dr. 
Orton's talk, which will be illustrated, 
will be given at 8:00. Those members 
unable to attend the dinner may plan 
to attend the lecture. Wives of mem- 
bers and members of the Centre County 
Medical Association are invited to the 
dinner meeting. 

o— 



CALENDAR 



VOCATIONAL ADVISEMENT 

CONFERENCES FOR WOMEN 

All meetings of the Vocational Ad- 
visement Conferences which begin this 
week are open to any who are interest- 
ed. Among the speakers will be Dr. C. 
H. Keene, Dr. A. L. Rowland, Miss Mur- 
iel Brown and Miss Anna L. Stanley, of 
the State Department of Public Instruc- 
tion, and Miss Mary A. Lindsley, Man- 
ager of the Grace Dodge Hotel, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

— . 

LE CERCLE FRANCAIS 

Le Cercle Francais will hold its first 
meeting of the year in Old Chapel on 
Thursday evening at eight o'clock. An 
interesting program has been arranged 
consisting of a Frent h play and attrac- 
tive musical numbers. Members of the 
Faculty ar"e cordially invited to attend. 



TUESDAY, December 5 

Salesmanship meeting for Canvass- 
ers, Auditorium, 7:00 p. m. 

Lecture, Women and Work, by Miss 
Helen M. Bennett, Chicago Collegiate 
Bureau of Occupations, at S:00 p. m. in 
Old Chapel. 

Members of the A. A. A. S. should 
reserve places for the annual dinner at 
the University Club. Phone C. R. Or- 
ton, Botany Building. 

WEDNESDAY, December G 
Vocational Advisement Conferences 
for girls, 2:30 to 5:30, Foyer of Aud- 
itorium. 

THURSDAY, December 7 
Vocational Advisement Conferences 
for girls, 1:30 to 5:30, Foyer of Audi- 
torium. 

FRIDAY, December 8 
Wives of Faculty members meet with 
Dean Knight, Room 121 Old Main, at 
4:30. 

Final meeting for Canvassers, Audi- 
torium, 7 : 00 p. m. 

SATURDAY, December !) 
('lull night at University Club. 
SUNDAY, December 10 
Chapel Speaker, Bishop Edwin H. 
Hughes, of Maiden, Massachusetts. 
MONDAY, December 11 
American Association of University 
Professors, 7:30, Engineering A. 
TUESDAY, December 12 
Fisk Jubilee Singers, 7:30, Auditorium 

THURSDAY, December 11 
College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Audi- 
torium. 

FACULTY MEMBERS' WIVES 

Dean Knight would like to meet all 
the wives of faculty members at 4:30 
on Friday in room 121 Old Main Build- 
ing, in the interests of the Campaign. 
o 

CONFERS WITH PINCHOT 

Dean E. A. Holbrook of the School of 
Mines attended a conference on the ad- 
ministration of labor laws at the home 
of Governor-elect Gifford Pinchot at 
Milford over the past weekend. Dean 
Holbrook presented the subject of Ad- 
ministration of Mining Laws and Codes. 



A. A. U. P. 

The local chapter of the American 
Association of University Professors 
will hold a meeting in Engineering A 
on Monday, December 11, at 7:30 p. mm. 
Members and applicants for member- 
ship are invited to attend. — .T.Ben Hill, 
secretary. 

o 

The Fisk Jubilee singers will give a 
concert in the Auditorium on the even- 
ing of December 12 for the benefit of 
the girls' endowment fund. 



n r- T r\ f-» </ T T 
i i . I ' • ^ , * • » — » 1 » 

3 13 ft. A I A ■ — • i ■ , • 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



Pennsylvania State Co 

ULTY BULLET 




Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 2 



State College, Pa., December 12, 1922 



NUMBER 14 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



COLLEGE SENATE 
The December meeting of the College 
Senate will be held Thursday evening 
at 7:30 in the Foyer of the Auditorium. 



SENATE MEMBERS NOTICE 
In making additions and corrections 
to curricula and courses it will sim- 
plify matters if each member of ihe 
Senate will bring to Thursday's meet- 
ing a copy of the report of the Commit- 
tee on Courses of Study submitted at 
the last meeting. — C. VV. Stoddart, chair- 
man. 

o 

LIBERAL ARTS FACULTY 

The regular meeting of the ' Liberal 

Arts Faculty will be held at 4:30 p. m. 

on Wednesday in room 25 Liberal Arts 

Building. — L. V. T. Simmons, secretary. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 
Sophomores 
Breading, John Robinson, AH 
Crumrine, Audley Shanes, MG 
Elder, Stanley Gordon, CF 
Howenstein, Rowland Ross, ME 

Freshmen 
Baker, Samuel Eugene, Ch 
Rowles, Carlton J., Mng 
Stiefel, Alexander, PL 



AG. FACULTY 
There will be a meeting of the Facul- 
ty of the School of Agriculture and, Ex- 
periment Station in room 103, Agricul- 
tural Building, at 4:30 p. m. on Thurs- 
day. The regular meeting of the Re- 
search Staff will toe held in room 103 
Ag. at 3:30 on Thursday.— R. L. Watts. 



LAST BULLETIN OF YEAR 

This will be the last issue of the 
Faculty Bulletin for 1922, the Christmas 
holidays starting on Friday, December 
15 at 5:20 p. m. and continuing until 
Wednesday, January 3, at 8:00 a.m. 
The next issue of the Bulletin will be 
that of January 9. 

2ND SEMESTER TIME TABLE 

Department heads may see the time 
table for the next semester at the office 
of the Assistant Registrar any morning 
this week before the beginning of the 
Christmas recess. 

If it is necessary for the instructor 
to have advance information about his 
individual schedule, he should ask the 
head of his department to secure a 
copy. 

The Assistant Registrar will not be 
in his office during the Christmas va- 
cation. 



FACULTY COOPERATION 

IN RADIO BROADCASTING 

An attempt will be made to start 
radio broadcasting at the new station 
back of the University Club as early 
in January as possible. So far as 
known, Penn State will be the second 
educational institution in the country 
to undertake the regular broadcasting 
of educational programs, the University 
of Wisconsin being the leader in this 
field. 

To make the feature a success, the 
greatest possible faculty cooperation is 
necessary. From one to three short 
talks on educational subjects will be 
desired for each program. A broad- 
casting questionnaire accompanies this 
issue of the Bulletin, and the immediate 
attention of every faculty member is 
urged in filling it out. 

There has been some delay in com- 
pleting the equipment of the station, 
and until thorough experiments are 
made, regular programs cannot be 
scheduled. The time of day and the 
days of the week for these programs 
cannot be defmitply determined until 
these tests are made. Tentatively, so 
as to have a working basis, the hour of 
6:30 p. m. on .Mondays. Wi-duesdays. 
and Fridays has been settled upon for 
a half-hour program. The success of 
the station operation and the faculty 
cooperation will govern any increasi 
in this arrangement. 

A tentative opening program has 
been arranged as follows: 

Radio Broadcasting Program 
Monday, January 8 or 15, 1923 
W P A B-360 Meters, Penn'a State Col- 
lege, State College, Pa. 

(i: 30— Selections by Penn State 
Quartet — "Blue and White" 
"Rosy O'Grady" 'tNittany 
Lion". 

0:35 — "Penn State" a talk on the 
college by President John M. 
Thomas 

C : 50 — Quartet — Selection 

6:55 — News items and description 
of "Penn State Broadcasting 
Service" 

The College Department of Public- 
Information, in making up programs, 
has no precedent to follow, and consid- 
erable experimenting will have to be 
done. In fillling in your subjects on 
the attached blank, the following gener- 
al points are to be observed: 

1 — Lengthy talks are to be discour- 
aged. They are to be given at from 100 
to 125 words a minute. Five minutes, 
or 50"0- to 700-word articles, will be the 
maximum unless on a special subject 
by prearrangement. Two pages of 
double-spaced typewritten material 
would be sufficient. 

2 — Upon the selection of a subject, 
the person to give it will be notified 
at least TWO WEEKS in advance that 
he has been scheduled. Programs will 
be published weekly ' in the Faculty 
Bulletin and daily papers. 



CALENDAR 



TUESDAY, December 12 
Fisk Jubilee Singers, 7:30, Auditorium 

WEDNESDAY, December 13 

Liberal Arts Faculty, 4:30 in 25 L. A. 
Chirstmas Revels at University Club, 
7:30. Dancing starts at 8:00 

THURSDAY, December 11 
Ag. Research Staff, 3:30 in 103 Ag. 
Ag. Faculty, 4:30, in 103 Ag. 
College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Audi- 
torium 

FRIDAY, December 15 
Christmas vacation begins, 5:30 p. m. 

WEDNESDAY, January 3 
Christmas vacation ends, 8:00 a. m. 



3 — It is des'red that the person sched- 
uled for a talk give it personally when 
scheduled. If for any reason this can- 
not be done a suitable substitute with 
a good speaking voice should be sent 
to tin- broadcasting studio to fill the 
engagement. 

4 — Talks should be typed and a carbon 
copy sent to the Department of Public 
Information a week before presenta- 
tion. The copy should be marked "For 
Radio Broadcasting" and bear the date 
of presentation. This is for possible 
news items for the newspapers the next 
day. 

5 — Talks may be given extemporane- 
ously, but a written manuscript will lie 
a safeguard against omitting the fea- 
ture in the event you are unable to ap- 
pear in person. 

6 — In preparing subjects keep in mind 
the fact that your audience of many 
thousand auditors is cosmopolitan, and 
not interested in purely technical facts. 
Popularizing comparisons will get you 
around technicalities, but it is best to 
choose subjects that will appeal to many 
people. 

7 — Give all possible subjects you can 
think of in answering the questionn- 
aire. Make each explain as fully as 
possible what is to be expected in the 
expanded talk. Each will receive care- 
ful consideration and ample notice will 
be given for preparation. 

|S — Calculating only two talks per 
program, it is possible for several hun- 
dred faculty members to be heard over 
the raido in the course of a year. If 
it is later found advisable to conduct 
nightly programs, it will be seen that 
as many subjects as possible are de- 
sired sent in from faculty member. 

The return of your filled-in ques- 
tionnaire before the Christmas vacation 
will be appreciated. 

P. L. Koenig. 209 Agricultural Build- 
ing, will have charge of agricultural 
features for broadcasting. The staff of 
the Department of Public Information 
will act as a clearing house for pro- 
grams, and it may become necessary to 
have a faculty representative on this 
work in each of the other schools. 






W.D.CROCKETT. 

3 13 U A I N E L D G . 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvani 




Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 2 



State College, Pa., January 9, 1923 



NUMBER 15 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



GRADUATE FACFLTY 
There will be a special meeting of 
the. Graduate Faculty today (Tuesday) 
at 4:30 p. m., in Old Chapel, to consid- 
er the recommendations on courses of 
study. — <F. D. Kern, dean. 

o 

LIBERAL ARTS FACFLTY 
The regular meeting of the Faculty 
of the School of Liberal Arts will be 
held on Wednesday, January 10, at 
4:30 p. m„ in room 25 L. A.— L. V. T. 
Simmons, secretary. 



REGISTRATION DAYS 

Registration days for the second 
semester, as scheduled in the College 
Catalogue, are January 17 to 20, Wed- 
nesday, Thursday, Friday, and Satur- 
day until noon. Registration posters 
giving detailed information have been 
placed on all bulletin boards and in 
the deans' offices. .The work of the 
second semester will begin at 8:00 a. 
m. on Monday, January 29. On and 
after that time all students are re- 
quired to present to instructors proper- 
ly approved schedule cards indicating 
that their college fees have been paid. 

o ■ 

STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

Since the last issue of the Bulletin 
the following students have left col- 
lege: 

Sophomores 

Mehaffie, N. K., EB 
Nolan, M. A., CF 

Freshmen 
Kinkead, E., Mng 
Lewis, R. S., EE 
McCaskey, T. C, CE 
Thompson, T. H., Ag 
Wentling, R. E., ME 
Winner, E. J., ME 

o 

EXAMINATION HOFRS 

The attention of all instructors is 
called to the hours for which final ex- 
aminations are scheduled. Three ex- 
aminations of two hours each are 
scheduled daily during the week of 
January 22 to 27 inclusive. The first 
examination will begin at 8:00 a. m. 
and end at 10:00 a. m. ; the second will 
begin at 10:20 a. m. and end at 12:20 
p. m.; the third will begin at 2:00 p. 
m. and end at 4:00 p. m. 

On account of the regular class work 
given to the short course students, 
the regular college bells will be rung 
during examination week. In addition 
to this, the bell will ring at 7:50 and at 
8:00 a. m.— W. S. Hoffman, Acting 
Registrar. 



MID-YEAR GRADUATES 

The attention of all instructors is 
called to the following list of 68 Sen- 
iors who expect to finish their courses 
aid get their degrees at the approach- 
ing Mid-Year Convocation. 

The grades of these Seniors should 
be reported on a separate sheet marked 
"Mid-Year Graduates", in order that 
they may be recorded at once without 
being sorted from a multitude of grade 
sheets belonging mainly to other stu- 
dents. 

No grades of mid-year graduates 
should reach the Registrar's office lat- 
er than 9:00 a. m. on Saturday. Janu- 
ary 27. 

Adams. D. K. Hollingsworth.MissJ 

Rabcock, H. F. Lent. A. 

BaiT, K. W. Lewis, W. N. 

Leek. C. R. I • igue, L. H. 

Berry, W. A. Lowman, E. A. 

Billin, R. T. Mateer, M. C. 

Boyle, Miss G. V. Moore, J. B. 
Bray, R. H. Morton, C. T. 

Brown, P. S. McAfee. Miss F. G. 

Browning, E. A. McOolloch, L. B. 
Byers, B. H. McColIum. S. C. 

Camara, M. A. Qberhiolser, E. H. 

Campbell, K. K. Oevmann, E. W. C. 
D iitgherty, J. R. Oliver. H. S. 
Duncan, W. R. Pinero, G. 

Eagan, P. J. Porr. G. H. 

Finney, R. V. Ramsay, Miss R. T. 

Fisher. Miss F. C. Reilcy, H. A. 
French, E. S. Replogle, Miss C. M. 

Friedman, O. H. Roche. P. J. 
Fulkerson, W. N. Roy, E. P. 
Gamble, H. R. s vford, H. A. 

Gerber, S. R. Schoch, A. R. 

Grittner, H. M. Schroepfer, F. W. 
Grove. G. W. Sell. C. G. 

Herbst, G. E. Serralles. P. J., Jr. 

Hobbes, W. H. Smith, C. N. 

Holder, L. H. Vogt, W. E. 

Hwa, Y. S. Weidenhamer, C. W. 

Jacob, M. L. Welch, J. W. 

Jennings, C. H. Williams, J. R. 

Kadel. D. M. Wilson, P. C. 

Knauff, J. A. Wilson, R. B. 

Leitzell, W. F. Woodward, C. E. 



UNIVERSITY CLFB 

The annual meeting of the Universi- 
ty Club will take place on Monday 
e -e.ning, January 15, at 8:00. Officers 
will be elected for the year, and the 
i leeting will be followed by a smoker. 
card party for club members, 
and partners will be held at 
the club Friday night of this week. 
Reservations stating what game it is 
desired to play should be made with 
Mr. Clayton before Wednesday. 



Dr. J. P. Ritenour attended the an- 
nual meeting of The American Stu- 
dent Health Association which was 
held at Columbia University during^* 
the Christmas holidays. W 



AG EXTENSION CONFERENCE 

The annual winter conference of 
county agents, extension specialists, 
and home economics extension work- 
ers will be held January 12 to 19. This 
is the week previous to the State Farm 
Products Show at Harrisburg. 



CALENDAR 

TFE^AYTjiiniuu-y 9 

Graduate Faculty meeting, 4:30, Old 
Chapel. 

Liberal Arts Lecture, "Daniel Web- 
ster" by Dr. Sparks, Old Chapel, 7:00. 
WEDNESDAY, January 10 
Liberal Arts Faculty meeting, 4:30, 
room 25 L. A. 

FRIDAY, January 12 
Card party, University Club. 

SATURDAY, January 13 
Basketball. Penn State vs. Carnegie 
Tech, Armory. 7:00. 

SUNDAY, January 14 
Chapel Si leaker — the Reverend Al- 
bert J. Alexander, of Beaver. Pa. 
MONDAY, January 15 
Annual meeting. University Club, 
Elections and smoker. 8:00. 

THURSDAY, January 18 
College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Audi- 
torium. 

RADIO QUESTIONNAIRES 
Comparatively few faculty members 
have answered the "Radio Question- 
naire" senl in them just before the 
Holidays. More of these must be 
forthcoming before any programs can 
be arranged. Unavcidable delay in 
assembling the broadcasting apparatus 
may postpone the station opening until 
the end of the month, but all question- 
naires should be returned this week. 
o 

FREE LECTFRE COURSE 

The first of the regular series of 
Tuesday Evening Free Lectures under 
the auspices of the School of Liberal 
Arts will be given in Old Chapel to- 
night (Tuesday) at 7:00. Dr. Sparks 
will be the opening speaker of this 
year's course, his subject being "Dan- 
iel Webster." 

The lecture next Tuesday will 
be given by Dean Knight on the sub- 
ject "George Sand." The full program 
of lectures has been mailed to all mem- 
bers of the faculty. 



EDUCATOR TO SPEAK 

Dr. W. C. Bagley, professor of Edu- 
cation at Columbia University, who 
is well-known as an educator and 
writer of text-books, will speak here 
on Friday evening of this week at 8:00 
in the Foyer of the Auditorium. All 
faculty members and others interest- 
ed are invited to attend. While in 
State College Dr. Bagley will install a 
chapter of Kappa Delta Pi, national 
educational fraternity. 



SPANISH CLUB 

The Circulo de los Amigos de la 
Lengua Espanola will have its last 
vocal and instrumental meeting for 
this semester on Wednesday evening, 
January 10, at 7:30 in Old Chapel. All 
interested are invited to attend. 



W. D. CROCKETT . 
313 MAIN BLDG 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty 



The Pennsylvania State Coll 

FACULTY BULLET 




Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 2 



State College, Pa., January 16, 1923 



NUMBER 16 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



COLLEGE SENATE 

The January meeting' of the College 
Senate will he held on Thursday even- 
ing' of this week at 7:30 in the Foyer 
of the Auditorium. 



GRADUATE FACULTY 

The regular meeting of the Gradu- 
ate Faculty will be held today (Tues- 
day) at 4:30 p. m. in the Old Chapel. 
— F. D. Kern, dean. 



AC RICULTURAL FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the Fac- 
ulty of the School of Agriculture and 
Experiment Station in room 103 Ag, at 
4:30 p. m. on Thursday, January IS. 
This meeting will be preceded by a 
meeting of the Agricultural Research 
Staff at 3:30 in the same room. — R. 
jL. Watts, dean. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
itudents have left college: 

Juniors 

Skinner, Charles Robert, MB 
Vannucci, Joseph William, CF 

Freshmen 

Ash, Gibbons Owen, DArch 
Rubin, Miss Rebecca, AEd 



REGISTRATION DAYS 

J Registration days for the second 
Semester, as scheduled in the College 
Catalogue, are January 17 to 20, Wed- 
nesday, Thursday, Friday, and Satur- 
lay until noon. Registration posters 
?iving detailed information have been 
placed on all bulletin boards and in 
the deans' offices. The work of the 
second semester will begin at S:00 a. 
m. on Monday, January 29. On and 
lifter that time all students are re- 
quired to present to instructors prop- 
erly approved schedule cards indicat- 
ing that their college fees have been 
paid. 



FACULTY MAIL 

In order to increase the efficiency of 
the campus mail service, all Faculty 
members are requested to direct their 
correspondence to the proper depart- 
ment as well as to the building. It is 
not enough to address the letter to 
'Professor Blank, Old Main." It should 
ie "Professor Blank, English Depart- 
ment, Old Main," etc. 



Associate Professor W. F. Dunaway, 
'f the department of History, Political 
Science, and Economics, has been 
'ranted the degree of Doctor of Phil- 
sophy by Columbia University. 



WANTED: CAMPAIGN WORKERS 

The Campaign is now in urgent 
need of more Faculty canvassers. 
Members of the Faculty who find 
themselves free for Campaign work 
at the end of the semester are urged 
to see Mr, Espenshade at the Head- 
quarters Office for definite assignment. 
As members of the Faculty your per- 
sonality, your loyalty, and your special 
knowledge of the College and its needs 
give you a distinct advantage over 
outside workers. 



CALENDAR 



MEMBERSHIP IN THE A. A. A. S. 

It is customary at this season of the 
year for the American Association for 
'■] e Advancement of Science to invite 
a. 1 'plications for membership. Member- 
ship is for the calendar year. The lo- 
cal branch will be glad to welcome new 
members to the Association, either as 
national or local members, Any one 
mere-ted may consult the secretary. 
V special invitation has been issued 
to members of the American Associa- 
tion of University Professors to join 
without the payment of the regular 
initiation fee. — J. Ben Hill, secretary. 



ATTEND ANNUAL MEETING 

Miss Louise Moss and Miss Evelyn 
Smith of the Home Economics facul- 
ty recently attended the fifth annual 
meeting of the American Dietetic As- 
sociation iat Washington, D. C. The 
program of the meeting was exceeding- 
ly interesting and worth while, and 
members of the Association were es- 
pecially fortunate in being able to visit 
the Johns Hopkins and Walter Reed 
Hospitals, the Office of Home Econom. 
ics of the U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture, and the Grace Dodge and Gov- 
ernment Hotels. 

DEAN HOLBROOK HONORED 

Dean E. A. Holbrook of the School 
of Mines has been re-iappointed a mem- 
ber of the American Engineering Stan- 
dards Committee of New York. This 
national committee brings together all 
engineering interests for the purpose 
of promoting and passing upon all 
engineering standards as proposed for 
the United States. 



Associate Professor C. A. Bonine, of 
the department of Geology, represent- 
ed Perm State at the annual meeting 
of the Geological Society of America 
and the Society of Economic Geologists 
held at Ann Arbor, Michigan, during 
the Holidays. 



UNIVERSITY CLUB 

The Perm State Players' perform- 
ance and dance following, previously 
announced for Friday evening" of this 
week, has been changed to Saturday 
evening. 



TUESDAY, January 16. 

Graduate Faculty meeting, 4:30, Old 
Chapel. 

Liberal Arts Lecture, "George Sand." 
by Dean Knight, 7:00, Old Chapel. 
THURSDAY, January 18 

Agricultural Research staff meeting, 
3:30, room 103 Ag. 

Agricultural Faculty meeting, 4:30 
room 103 Ag. 

College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Aud- 
itorium. 

FRIDAY, January 1!) 

Centre County Alumni Meeting, 7:30, 
Old Chapel. 

American Association of University 
Processors meeting. University Club, 
7:30. 

SATURDAY, January 20 
Perm State Players performance 

and dance. University Club. 

Basketball, Penn State vs. Bethany. 

Armory, 7:00. 

SUNDAY, January 21 

There will be no chapel because of 
the start of examination week. 

TUESDAY NIGHT LECTURE 
The second of the Liberal Arts lec- 
ture series will be held in Old Chapel 
tonight at 7:00. Dean Knight will 
speak on the subject "George Sand." 
This will be the last lecture until af- 
ter the opening of the second semes- 
ter, the next one being scheduled for 
February 6. 

— o 

A. A. U. P. 
A meeting of the Association of Uni- 
versity Professors will .be held in the 
card room (.basement) of the Univer- 
sity Club on Friday evening of this 
week at 7:30. The chief item of bus- 
iness will be the election of officers for 
1923 and a discussion of the problems 
of intercollegiate athletics. A light 
lunch will be served after the meeting, 
price 30 cents. — J. Ben Hill, secretary. 



o 



GRADUATE COURSES 
The Department of History, Political 
Science and Economics will offer the 
following graduate courses the second 
semester: Hist. 503, The Formation of 
the Federal Constitution — Dr. Duna- 
way; Hist. 530, The Beginnings of 
Modern England — Dr. Gillespie; and 
Econ. 503, The Development of Eco- 
nomics since 1873 — Dr. Boucke. 



-o- 



1NCOME TAX 

Although members of the faculty 
are exempt from income tax on their 
college salaries, those having suffi- 
cient outside income must pay tax on 
the latter. For the benefit of such 
faculty members it is stated that con- 
tributions to the Emergency Building 
Fund may properly be deducted from 
the amount of the income before fig- 
uring the tax. 



W . P . CROCKETT , 
3 13 MAIN S L n a . 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. \V. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 2 



State College, Pa., January 23, 1923 



NUMBER 17 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

SENIOR GRADES 

The attention of all instructors is 
called to the method of reporting 
grades for those Seniors who expect to 
receive their degrees at the Mid- Year 
Convocation. A list of such candidates 
was printed in the January 9th issue 
of the Bulletin. 

The grades of these Seniors should 
be reported on a separate sheet 
marked "Mid-Year Graduates", in or- 
der that they may be recorded without 
delay. No grades of mid-year gradu- 
ates should reach the Registrar's of- 
fice later than 9:00 a. m. on Saturday 
of this. week. 



COUNCIL ACTION 

The Council of Administration, at its 
meeting on January 8, took the follow- 
ing action: "At the request of Mr. 
Olmstead, Secretary of the Y. M. C. A.. 
the Council voted that regular college 
classes be dismissed during the last 
hour in the forenoon of Friday, Feb- 
ruary 2, in order to allow an oppor- 
tunity for a general student convoca- 
tion to be addressed by Mr. Arthur 
Rugh." 



GRADE REPORTS 

The Registrar desires to call the 
attention of all faculty members to the 
following college regulation: 

"Grade reports must be turned in 
within two weeks after the date of 
the examination". — W. S. Hoffman, 
Acting-Registrar. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 

'-!f. 

Sophomores 

Bittner, Leo Joseph, CF 
Peairs, James Culbert, Ech 

Freshmen 

Martin, Richard Herbert, PI.. 
Price, John William, LA 



FAILURES OF GIRL STUDENTS 

Members of the Faculty are asked 
to forward promptly to Dean Knight 
the names of all women students who 
receive a condition or failure in their 
semester's work. 



R, 0. T. C. 

At the last meeting of the College 
| Senate it was voted that in the future 
Mil. Drill 1, 2, 3, and 4 be designated 
as R. O. T. C. 1, 2, 3, and 4 in ac- 
accordance with the request of the 
Military Department and the recom- 
mendation of the Committee on Cours- 
es of Study. 



SENATE ACTION 

President Thomas announced at the 
last meeting of the Senate the forma- 
tion of an organization to be known 
as "The Association of R. O. T. C. In- 
stitutions of the Third Corps Area", 
with membership composed of the 
Presidents or Heads of the institutions 
having R. O. T. C. units, the Professors 
of Military Science and Tactics, and 
one representative of the Faculty of 
each institution. 

The Senate voted to accept member- 
ship in this Association and elected 
is its faculty representative, Profes- 
sor E. D. Walker. 



CALENDAR 



DR. SPARKS TO LEAVE 
ON SPEAKING 



TOUR 

Dr. Edwin E. Sparks expects to be 
away from State College during the 
second semester as he is leaving at 
the close of the present term for a 
speaking tour of colleges and univer- 
sities in the southeastern states in the 
interest of better scholarship as per- 
sonified in Phi Kappa Phi Honor So- 
i iety elections. Dr. Sparks gave a sim- 
lliir lecture tour a year ago. After 
closing the series of addresses he will 
join his family at Coronado, Florida, 
until April. 

o 

M KD1TERRANEAN CRUISE 

Professor I. L. Foster, head of the 
Romance Language Department, ac- 
companied by Mrs. Foster, will .sail 
from Xew Stork on Saturday, Febru- 
ary 3, on board the S. S. "Empress of 
Scotland" for a Mediterranean cruise 
and continental tour that will last un- 
til about June first. Gibralter, Athens, 
Constantinople, Jerusalem, Damascus, 
Alexandria, Cairo, Naples, Rome and 
other points will be visited on the 
<•rui.se. The month of April will be 
spent in and around Paris; London 
and Brussels will be visited from May 
1 to 20; and then the return trip to 
New York. Professor Foster will be 
back at State College in time for Com- 
mencement and will resume work dur- 
ing the Summer Session. On the trip 
ho expects to visit as many foreign 
institutions as possible in order to 
study their methods of teaching lang- 
uages. 

, 

MID-YEAR CONVOCATION 

The annual Mid-Year Convocation 
will be held in the Auditorium next 
Tuesday evening at 7:30. About 70 
bachelor degrees and five advanced de- 
grees will be conferred at that time. 
Further announcement concerning the 
program will be made in next week's 
Bulletin. 

o 

Assistant Professor C. W. Robinson, 
of the department of Geology, at- 
tended the meeting of the Geological 
Section of the American Association 
for the Advancement of Science at 
Boston. 



FRIDAY January 26 

Ladies Night at University Club. 

SATURDAY, January 27 
Basketball, Penn State vs. Lebanon 
Valley, 7:00, Armory. 

SUNDAY, January 28 
Chapel Speaker — President Thomas. 

MONDAY, January 29 
Second semester begins, 8:00 a. m. 

TUESDAY, January 30 
Mid-Year Convocation, Auditorium. 
7:30 p. m. 

PENN STATE PLAYERS TO 

CONTINUE EXTENSION WORK 

The extension department of the Penn 
State Players has prepared the first 
of a series of bulletins dealing with 
amateur dramatics which will be sent 
tree upon request to any citizen of 
Pennsylvania. The first bulletin con- 
tains a list of 150 plays suitable to high 
schools and colleges, while following 
bulletins will treat on such subjects as 
the choice of a play, scenery, costumes, 
lighting, make-up. plays for children, 
and plays for rural communities. The 
Players will also continue to give plays 
in various communities of the state 
where they are asked to appear, the 
only cost to the community being the 
actual expense involved. This exten- 
sion work of the Players was started 
a year or so ago and is in line with 
the college aim to serve the communi- 
ties of the state. 



MISS KNIGHT TO TRAVEL 

Dean Margaret A. Knight has been 
granted a leave of absence for the sec- 
ond semester and will sail from New 
York on the S. S. "President Wilson" 
on Saturday. Miss Knight will be ac- 
companied by her father and mother 
and will visit a number of Mediter- 
ranean ports in addition to spending 
considerable time in Egypt and if pos- 
sible, the Holy Land. She will return 
to Penn State in time for the opening 
of the Summer Session on June 25. 

During the absence of Dean Knight, 
Miss Charlotte E. Ray, of Pittsburgh, 
will be acting-dean of women. Miss 
Ray was assistant dean of women last 
summer. 



A. A. A. S. 

Members of the State College branch 
of the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science are requested 
to send their ballots for officers to the 
secretary. The election will be closed 
on January 31. — J. Ben Hill, secretary. 
o 

Friday will be Ladies Night at the 
University Club. The affair will be in- 
formal and dinner reservations should 
be made with Mr. Clayton not later 
than Wednesday. Saturday will be 
club night. 



i i f * 

; A I N 






Published every Tuesday 
luring the college year as a 
neans of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
tems of interest to the facul- 

y. 



The Pennsylvania State College 




Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
toi 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er ;han 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 2 



State College, Pa., January 30, 1923 



NUMBER 18 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

WOBKEBS WAFTED 

The Campaign is in urgent need of 
more Faculty canvassers to push the 
gathering of signed pledge blanks. Al- 
though the saying is that "the first 
nillion is the hardest", the second will 
lot be raised without work, and as 
nembers of the Faculty your person- 
lity, your loyalty, and your special 
knowledge of the College and its needs 
nake you particularly valuable for 
his service. Members of the Faculty 
,vho will volunteer for Campaign duty 
ire urged to see Mr. Espenshade at 
he Headquarters Office. 



COUNCIL ACTION 

According to action of the Council of 
Vdininistration, regular college classes 
vill be dismissed during the last hour 
ii the forenoon on Friday of this week 
the request of Mr. Olmstead, Sec- 
etary of the Y. M. C. A. This is to 
illow an opportunity for a general stu- 
dent convocation to be addressed by 
\lv. Arthur Rugh. 



GRADE KEFOBTK 

Attention of all faculty members is 
iigain called to the college regulation 
which provides that all grade reports 
mist be in the hands of the Registrar 
ivithin two weeks after the date of the 
'xamination. 



SENATE ACTION 

The following action was taken by 
the College Senate at its January 
neeting: 

On recommendation of the Senate 
jommittee on Academic Standards, 
the Senate voted that in the Summer 
Session the length of one recitation 
period be increased from 50 to 60 min- 
utes and that the number of such per- 
iods be reduced from six to five per 
week so that the required number of 
credits may be obtained during the 
Summer Session without the schedul- 
ing of any exercises on Saturday. This 
is with the understanding that the 
length of the daily assignments shall 
be increased correspondingly so that 
the total amount of work covered dur- 
ing the Summer Session in any course 
will remain unchanged. 



The following recommendations of 
the Senate Committee on Academic 
Standards were adopted: 

1. That the value of one credit be 
changed from 2V 2 hours of work per 
week to 3 hours of work per week. 

2. That the normal schedule of hours 
for each semester consist of from 15 
to IS hours of work per week exclu- 
sive of Military Drill and Physical Ed- 
ucation. 

3. That no regular student be per- 



mitted to remain in college with a 
schedule of less than 12 credit hours 
without special action of his School 
approved by the President. 

4. That one credit be give): for each 
4S hours of work completed in a sup- 
ervised summer practicum, and that 
one credit be granted for three weeks 
of unsupervised work of an approved 
character during the summer. 

5. That one credit be granted for 
a eh week of an inspection trip. 



IS T U DEN TS \ VI T II D H A W 

During the past week the following 
indents have left college: 

Sophomore 

Christensen, Carl Wilhehn, ICh 
Freshmen 

Barnes, Raymond Scott, CE 
Geissinger, William James, CE 
Holter, Miss Carrie M., VHE 
Ivemerer, James Paul, LA 
Roberts, Harry Benson. I lit 
Waltz, William Wilson, BME 

Two- Year Ag's 

Dcrmody, Granville Richard, 1st yr 
Hotchkiss, Lotcn K.. 1st yr. 
Merkel, Norton Wilmer, 1st yr. 
Reno, Norman I., 2nd yr. 
Sh erred, Lucion S., 1st yr. 



TRUSTEES ELECT OFFICERS 

The annual meeting of the College 
Board of Trustees was held in Harris- 
burg, last Tuesday, with Governor I'in- 
chot, Superintendent Finegan, and 
Secretary of Agriculture Willits among 
those in attendance. Most of the time 
was spent in preparing material for 
the biennial budget to be submitted to 
the Legislature and the budget was 
'hen referred to the Executive Com- 
mittee for final action. 

The following officers were re-elect- 
ed: President. Judge H. Walton Mit- 
chell; vice-president, J. G. White; sec- 
retary, Dr. J. M. Thomas; and the Ex- 
ecutive Committee, composed of Vance 
C. McCormick, E. S. Bayard, M. L. 
Dowry, E. R. Pettebone, J. L. Orvis, 
J. F. Shields, and Judge Mitchell. 



SUMMER TOFR OF FRANCE 

The Commtitee for Educational Trav- 
el in France has announced a 72-day 
tour for the summer of 1923 for fac- 
ulty members and advanced under- 
graduates of American colleges. The 
tour begins at New York about July 
1st, and includes a course of four 
weeks in one of the nine leading 
French universities, an eight-day tour 
to interesting parts of France, and a 
two-weeks' course at the Sorbonne. 
The cost averages less than $9.00 per 
day from New York to New York. 

Information pamphlets may be ob- 
tained from the office of the Dean of 
Men. 



CALENDAR 

TUESDAY, January :t0 

Mid- Year Convocation, Auditorium, 
7:30. 

SUNDAY, February i 

Chapel Speaker — The Reverend 

Francis Shunk Downs, of the First 
Presbyterian Church, Tyrone, at the 
morning service. Mr. Arthur Rugh at 
the evening service. 

TUESDAY. February (i 

Liberal Arts Lecture, Old Chapel, 
7:00. 

31 1 1 ) - Y E A B C O N V O C A T 1 < > N 

WILL BE HELD TONIGHT 

The annual Mid- Year Commence- 
ment Exercises will take place in the 
Auditorium this evening starting at 
7:30. A class of approximately 70 men 
and women will receive bachelor de- 
grees while -six advanced degrees will 
also be conferred. Although the ex- 
ercises will be informal, the college ad- 
ministrative officers and members of 
the teaching staff will occupy seats on 
the stage, and those who can appear 
in academic costume are asked to do 
so. 

President Thomas will confer the de- 
giees and he will also make the ad- 
dress to the graduating class. The 
invocation will be given by Professor 
Pattee, and the awarding of honorary 
military certificates to those members 
of the class who were in military ser- 
vice will be in charge of Professor E. 
D. Walker. 

The following are candidates for ad- 
vanced degrees: Master of Science— 
Alan B. Laudermilch, of the Forestry 
department; Philip X. Rice, Electrical 
Engineering department; Marshall J. 
Maxfield, Brooklyn, N. Y.; and Arthur 
J. Souba. Hopkins, Minn.; Civil Engin- 
eer — James M. Angle. Pittsburgh; Me- 
chnnlcal Engineer — Hylton R. Brown, 
Washington, D. C. 



-o- 



Y. M. C. A. CAMPAIGN 

The annual Y. M. C. A. evangelistic 
campaign will be conducted this week 
by Arthur Rugh. He will speak in 
the Auditorium on Friday at 11:10 a. 
m. and at 7:00 p. m.; on Saturday at 
7:00 p. m.; and on Sunday at 6:30 p. 
m. at the regular chapel hour. In ad- 
dition he will speak to faculty mem- 
bers and their wives Sunday at 2:00 
p. m. in the foyer of the Auditorium. 
In preparation for his coming a facul- 
ty prayer meeting will be held in 12 G 
Old Main at 12:10 on Tuesday, Wed- 
nesday, and Thursday. 



The next number in the Liberal Arts 
Lecture Course will be given in the 
Old Chapel a week from tonight by 
Professor J. A. Ferguson. The sub- 
ject is "The Use We Have Made of 
Our Forests", and the talk will be il- 
lustrated. 



W. D. CROCKETT , 
3 13 U A I N BLDG. 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 2 



State College, Pa., February 6, 1923 



NUMBER 19 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

ENGINEERING FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the "Eng- 
ineering Faculty on Monday, February 
12, at 3:30 in Room 200, Engineering 
D. — R. L. Sackett, dean. 



SI IDE IN TS WITH DBA W 

During the past week the following 
students have left college : 

Seniors 
Bourne, Joseph B., CE. 
Harral, Henry D., CE. 

Sophomores 

Burrus, Allen Douglass, AH. 
Gordon, MacClellan Thompson, EE 
Grupp. Fred William, ME. 
Michalske, August, PM. 
Millard, James William, PL. 
Miller, William Charles, CE. 
Thamerus, William Phillip, AE 

Freshmen 

Adams, Ralph Harold, PL, 
Albright, Charles Richard, EE 
Alexander, George Wilbur, LArch. 
Clemens, Franklin James, ICh. 
Crevoisie, Clinton Edward, IE. 
Davis, Cyrus Reginald, For 
Freehling, Alvin Louis, PL. 
Gorman. Francis J., ICh. 
Irving, Chester Lee, Ag. 
Kirk, Robert Moore, Mng. 
Koehler, Paulus Emile, CF. 
MacFarlane, Robert Parrier, For. 
Martz, James Charles, Mng. 
Meyer, Ambrose Eden, Ag. 
Speilman, John Carl, EE. 
Steele, Robert Preston, Ech. 
Suit, Frederick Walter, CE. 
Thomas, William Carl, PM. 
Van Cleve, John Edward, For. 
Watkins, Chester Alexander, Ag. 
Weigand, Glenn Robert, CE. 
Wiley, Burton Clifton, PM. 
Young, Ralph Alvin, ME. 
Two-Year Ag 
Baird, Evan H., 2nd year. 

Probation Section 
French, Paul Gibson, 



TRUSTEE ACTION 

At the January meeting of the Board 
of Trustees the following recommenda- 
tions of the College Senate for changes 
in curricula presented by the Commit- 
tee on Courses of Study were approved: 
In the School of the Liberal Arts to 
drop the Classical, Mathematics, and 
Modern Language curricula and the 
options in Psychology and Philosophy 
and in Economics and Sociology from 
the curricula in Education and Psy- 
chology and in History and Political 
Science respectively; 

To substitute for the curricula and 
options dropped on Arts and Letters 
curriculum. 



To change the name of the Education 
and Psychology curriculum to the 
Teacher Training curriculum, and of 
the Pre-Legal curriculum in History 
and Political Science to the Pre-Le- 
ga! curriculum, dropping from 
the last named curriculum the 
Senior year outline, since the last year 
of this curriculum is taken in an ap- 
proved law school. Students wishing 
to spend four years in this work 
at Penn State must transfer to the 
Arts and Letters curriculum and major 
in History and Political Science. 
o 

jSEW DEPARTMENT 

A l the annual meeting of the Board 
of Trustees held in Harrisburg recently 
the following action was taken: That 
beginning with the first semester of the 
academic year 1923-24, the present De- 
artment of History, Political Science, 
and Economics be divided into two in- 
dependent departments, one to be 
known as the Department of History 
and Political Science with Dr. A. E. 
Martin as the head and the other to be 
known as the Department of Econom- 
ics and Sociology with Dr. O. F. Boucke, 
as the acting-head. 

CATERING CLASS 

A catering class in Institutional Man- 
agement will be conducted during the 
pre: cut semester by the Department 
o. Home Economics. In this class the 
students will be prepared to cater for 
luncheons, dinners, teas, receptions and 
banquets. Since the class will be avail- 
able for this service only once a week 
-—on Tuesdays — it is desirable that 
any individuals or groups wishing to 
take advantage of the work, make ar- 
rangements at the Home Economics 
office as soon as possible. 



CALENDAR 



FOLLOW-UP MEETING 

A follow-up meeting of the Arthur 
Rugh campaign will ;:>e held in Room 
US Old Main at 4:30 this afternoon 
(Tuesday). The dismission will deal 
with what the faculty mea, particularly 
the single and younger married group, 
can do to promote a religion that will 
be practical, forceful and helpful to both 
students and faculty. Ail interested 
are asked to attend. 



OFFICERS OF THE A. A. A. S. 

The following officers have been el- 
ected by the State College Branch of 
the American Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Science: Chairman, C. 
R. Orton; vice-chairman, R. D. An- 
thony; treasurer, J. E. DeCamp; to 
executive committee, Miss Edith P. 
Chace and D. F. McFarland. The 
term of the secretary, J. Ben Hill, does 
not expire until 19'24. 



TUESDAY, February 6 

Liberal Arts Lecture, Old Chapel, at 
7:00 p. m. 

THURSDAY, February 8 
Wrestling, Penn State vs. Virginia, 
Armory, 7:00 p. m. 

Hum ir Suoiei \ ( ',< iinicil, 1 lean \V:i in 
ock's office, 7:00 p. m. 

FRIDAY, February 9 
Basketball, Penn State vs. Dickin- 
son, Armory 7:00 p. m. 

SUNDAY, February 11 
Chapel Speaker — The Reverend Dr. 
James L. Barton, of Boston, Mass. 
MONDAY, February 12 
Engineering Facui'y meeting, 3:30, 
Room 200 Engineering D. 

TUESDAY, February 18 
Liberal Arts Lecture, Old Chapel, 
7: oo p. m. "American Humor'' by Pro- 
fessor Pattee. 

THURSDAY, February 15 
College Senate, 7:30 p m. Foy-ir of 
Auditorium. 



LIBERAL ARTS LECTURE 

The third number of the Liberal Arts 
Lecture Series will be given in Old 
Chapel tonight by Professor J. A. Fer- 
guson on the subject "The Use Ee 
Have Made of Our Forests." The talk 
will be illustrated. Next week's lecture 
will be by Professor F. L. Pattee 
on "American Humor." 



HOME ECONOMICS TRIP 

The Senior students in Institutional 
Management of the Department of 
Home Economics were on their annual 
inspection trip to Philadelphia last 
week. They visited the Jefferson Uni- 
versity, and Methodist Episcopal Hos- 
pitals, the food departments of the 
Bellevue-Stratford and Adelphia Ho- 
tels, the Curtis Publishing Company, 
the Campbell Soup Company, several 
high school lunch rooms, equipment 
■stores, and wholesale and retail mar- 
kets. 



MAGAZINES WANTED 

The local Y. M. C. A. is desirous of 
collecting magazines, technical jour- 
nals, and discarded text books. Thes3 
will be forwarded to Europe for the 
use of students and professors in 
countries like Czeeho-Slovakia, where 
in some sections whole classes are 
compelled to work with a single text 
book. Such magazines as the Satur- 
day Evening Post, the National Geo- 
graphic, the American, etc., are highly 
appreciated and should be left at the 
Y. M. C. A. Hut, or they will be col- 
lected if the address is phoned to the 
Hut. 





A 


/ 


J 






-V/ 3SU ... 



; : 



•Duia n i v n £ i £ 






.) ti., 



in, ■ ■ 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 2 



State College, Pa., February 13, 1923 



NUMBER 20 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

COLLEGE SENATE 
regular meeting' of the College 
ill be held on Thursday even- 
._ i ^s week at 7:30 in the Foyer 
of the Auditorium. 

AGRICULTURAL FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the Fac- 
ulty ol" the School of Agriculture ami 
Experiment Station on Thursday of 
this week at 4:30 in room 103 of the 
Agricultural Building. This will be pre- 
ceded by a meeting of the Agricultural 
Research 'Staff at 3:30 in room 206 of 
the Ag. Building. — R. L. Watts, dean. 



INSTRUCTORS' SCHEDULES 

Each member of the teaching staff 
will please send to the Assistant Regis- 
trar, before February 24, a copy of his 
v.ctual schedule, indicating the room 
(number and building) in which he is 
located at any given time. — W. S. Hoff- 
man, Acting-Registrar. 

STUD E NT S WIT H 1) RAW 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 

Junior 

Ressler, Elmer Otto, EE 
Sophomores 

Cummings, Francis Joseph, CE 
Hamilton, William, Jr., IE 
Runnette Charles Wilson, CF 

Freshmen 

Cunningham, Theodore Miller, LA 
Doran, John Delmar, EE 
Heckman, Evan August, Ag 
McAndrew, Paul Clarke, LA 
Rugh, Kenneth Augustus, PM 



GRADUATE ASSISTANTS v 
At a recent meeting of the Board 
of Trustees, approval was given to 
i recommendation of the Council of 
|Administration for the establishment 
of a rank in the collegiate staff to be 
known as Graduate Assistants, with 
i standard compensation in the vari- 
ous schools and departments, with 
ipproximately equal requirements as 
>o service to the college, and with 
he same privileges for graduate stil- 
ly as set forth more in detail in the 
'ollowing : 

1. Appointees mus,t be graduates 
vho have given promise of ability to 
to research or to carry on graduate 
itudy; 

I 2. Appointments to be for ten 
jnonths, September 1 to June 30, — spe- 
cial appointments for the Summer 
>ession may be made; 

3. Service to the college to be one- 
ialf the duties required of instruc- 
ts or full time assistants in the 



school or department in which lie is 
employed; 

4. The rate of compensation to be 
determined at the January meeting 
of the Board of Trustees each year. 
Summer Session Graduate Assistants 
shall receive one-fourth the regular 
compensation; 

5. Enrollment in the Graduate 
School is obligatory and not more 
than two-thirds of a full schedule 
may be carried or not more than two- 
thirds of a full year's graduate work 
may be completed in any one year. 

G. Graduate Assistants shall be el- 
igible to reappointments while candi- 
dates for an advanced degree; 

7. Graduate Assistant's shall pay 
the registration and graduation fees, 
praeticum fees, except in their major 
subjects, but are exempt frjom the 
graduate student fee. 

II was further approved that the 
Graduate assistantships replace the 
positions formerly known as "Teach- 
ing and Investigation Fellowships", 
that previous regulations regarding 
these ranks be annulled, and that the 
term "fellowship" be reserved so far 
as possible for a rank awarded as an 
honor and carrying with it a stipend, 
but requiring only such duties as are 
assigned in connection with a course 
of study in the Graduate School lead- 
ing to an advanced degree. Nothing 
in this general statement regarding 
the fellowship rank is to be con- 
strued as affecting the provisions of 
special grants such as the John W. 
Wihite or the Elliott Fellowship in 
Engineering, etc., the same referring 
only to fellowships to be established in 
the future with funds of this institu- 
tion. 

UNIVERSITY CUB 

Saturday night will be club night 
at the University Club. On Thurs- 
day, February 22, Ladies Xight will 
be celebrated in a Washington's 
Birthday party, with dinner, dancing, 
and cards. The patronesses will bo 
Mrs. John M. Thomas, Mrs. E. A. 
Holbrook, and Miss Charlotte Ray. 
The party will be informal and reser- 
vations for dinner roust be made with 
Mr. Clayton not later than Monday, 
February 19. 



CALENDAR 



SALE OF MEAT 

During the second semester meat will 
be sold by the Animal Husbandry de- 
partment at the Stock Judging Pavil- 
ion at the following hours: 

Monday— 11:00 to 12:00 a. m. 

Tuesday— 2:00 to 5:00 p. m. 

Wednesday — 4:00 to 5:00 p. m. 

Thursday— 2 : 00 to 5:00 p. m. 

Friday— 11:00 to 12:00 a. m. 

Saturday— 10:00 to 12:00 a. m. 

To avoid delay in filling orders, they 
•may be telephoned to the Animal Hus- 
bandry office one day in advance of the 
time that the meat is desired. 



TUESDAY, February 1,5 

Liberal Arts Lecture, 7:00 p. m., 
Old Chapel. 

THURSDAY, February 15 

Agricultural Research Staff meet- 
ing, 3:30, room 206 Ag. 

Agricultural Facutly meeting, 

4:30, room 103 Ag. 

College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Au- 
ditorium. 

FRIDAY, February l(i 

Penn State Players. Red Cross ben- 
efit performance, 8:15, Auditorium. 

SATURDAY, February 17 

Athletic events — Penn State vs. Na- 
vy, boxing; Penn, wrestling; Pitt. 
basketball; Pitt Freshmen, basketball. 
See bulletin board for time of events. 

Penn State Players, 8:15, Auditori- 
um, 

University Club, smoker and club 
night. 

SUNDAY, February 18 

Chapel Speaker — President Thomas. 

PENN STATE PLAYERS 

IN RED CROSS BENEFIT 

The Penn State Players will ap- 
pear in the Auditorium next Friday 
and Saturday nights, February 16 and 
17, in "A Successful Calamity" which 
is being given as a Red Cross bene- 
fit performance through the courtesy 
of the Players. When the Red Cross 
canvass of the town was made this 
year not enough funds were raised 
to defray the expenses of the local 
work so that additional money must 
be raised. For this reason the per- 
formances this week should be well 
attended. 

An additional reason for attendance 
lies in the fact that the Players have 
been doing unusually good work in 
a dramatic way and those who at- 
tend are sure to witness a most en- 
joyable presentation of their latest 
farce-comedy under the direction of 
Professor A. C. Cloetingh. 

Tickets for the performances may 
be obtained from members of the Red 
Cross committee composed of Mrs. F. 
D. Gardner, Mrs. J. Ben Hill, and Mrs. 
F. L. Bentley, and they will also be 
on sale at Metzger's during the re- 
mainder of this week and at the box 
office each evening. Prices are 25, 
50, and 75 cents and the performance 
will start each evening at 8:15. 



LIBERAL ARTS LECTURE 

Tonight's lecture in the Liberal Arts 
Lecture Series will be on "American 
Humor" by Professor F. L. Pattee. 
Next Tuesday's lecture will be "iSmap- 
shots in Spain" by Professor W. K. 
Jones. This talk will be illustrated. 



W. P. CROCKETT. 
3 1 3 U A IN B L D G 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



VOLUME 2 



1 



he Pennsylvania State Coll 




Contributions must be aa 
brief as possible, and reach 
Ci W. Sullivan. Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



State College, Pa., February 20, 1923 



NUMBER 21 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the follow- 
ng students have left college: 
Junior 
Bowden, Clarence Albert, Met 

Sophomores 
Bonn, Peter Joseph, BE 
Heffner, Thomas Forester, CF 
Lewis, Paul Orville, ICh 
"Way, David Caleb, DH 

Freshmen 

Dunbar, Herbert Leland, Fur 
Price, Harry Wesley, IE 
Smith, Gordon Angus, IE 
Vought, Marlin Edward, PM 

Two Year Ag. 
Walls, Henry V., 1st year 



STUDENTS DROPPED 

Vt the end of the first semester of 
le current college year the following 
udents have failed to pass in fifty 
er cent of their scheduled work and 
re therefore dropped from College : 

SCHOOL OF MINES 
Freshmen 

Kirk, Robert Moore, Mng 
Price, Harold Lewis, Mng 
iarioks, Palmer Charles, Mng 

School of Engineering 

Seniors 

Allen, Ralph Philip, EE 
Nesbitt, Charles Bellamy, EE 

Juniors 
Avery, Sidney Badger, EE 
Finnegan, John Aloysius, EE 
Gallagher, Francis Joseph, EE 
Grove, Arthur Wilson, CE 
Ressler, Elmer Otto, EE 

Sophomores 

Bell, James, Jr., IE 
Chamberlain, Alan Charles, EE 
Cook, Donald Miller, CE 
Ramsay, Edwin Campbell, EE 
Stewart, James Wheeler, EE 
Tressler, Russell Lewis, IE 

Whitehead, Calvin Johnson, CE 

Freshmen 
Albright, Charles Richard, EE 
Beck, Kenneth George, CE 
Blowers, Robert Gardner, EE 
Bonita, James John, ME 
Doran, John Delmar, EE 
Douglass, Samuel Lake, CE 
Gardenhaur, Allen Jasper, EE 
Gerhard, Lewis Henry, CE 
Krause, Edward John, CE 
Kurtz, Clyde Revere, EE 
McVicker, Norman Leitch, CE 
Moore, Charles Wendell, EE 
Newham, Richard Simmons, ME 
Oldfield, Robert George, ME 
Pardoe, Walter Eugene, EE 
Patterson, George James, EE 

Pickel, Harry Adam, Jr., IE 
Reed, Herbert LeRoy, CE 
Roberts, James J., IE 



Sehearer, Edwin H.. CE 
Steele, Robert Preston, Ech 
Suit, Frederick Walter, CE 
Torrence, Cecil Miles, IE 
Williams, Lewis Trevor, EE 
Wolfe, Ralph Norman, ME 
Waltz, William Wilson, RME 
Yang, Ching Kun, IE 
Young, Ralph Alvin, ME 

Special 
Keeler, Fred M., CE 

School of Liberal Arts 

Senior 

Thomas, Arthur Wendell, CF 

Juniors 
Bechtel, Earle Sehultz, CF 
Talbot, Henderson, CF 

Sophomores 

Armstrong, Joseph Gray, CF 
Flock, John Fred, CF 
Kerstetter, Meredith, CF 
Sampsel, James Oliver, CF 
Wieder, Plomer Wiedman, PL 

Freshmen 
Adams, Ralph Harold. PL 
Anderson, Chauncey W., PL 
Chambers, Mary Bell, LA 
Cluley, Ethelbert Richey, LA 
Cunningham, Theodore Miller, LA 
Erb, John Edward, CF 
Freehling, Alvin Louis, PL 
Heffner, Alice Valeria, LA 
Koehler, Paulus Emile, CF 
McAndrew, Paul Clarke, LA 
Ohliger, Paul Lake, LA 
Olson, Paul Henry, LA 
Ride, Ray Allport, CF 
Rumbaugh, Samuel Smiley, PL 
Swisher, Hugh John, PL 
Yoder, John Byer, CF 

School of Natural Science 
Junior 

Weitzenkorn, Emanuel 



CALENDAR 



Ch 



Sophomore 

Welch, Edward Marvin, ICh 

Freshmen 
Bossert, William Brown, PM 
Eunn, Leonard J., ICh 
Davis, John Stockdale, NS 
Gorman, Frank John, ICh 
Maines, Merrill Cameron, ICh 
Miller, John Veil, ICh 
Paxton, Harry Donald, NS 
Rugh, Kenneth Augustus, PM 
Rupp, Chester Morrow, Ch 
Sidner, Gerald Jack, ICh 
Thomas, William Carl, PM 
Zimmerman, Clark Benjamin, PM 



STUDENTS DROPPED 

The following students were dropped 
from the School of Engineering he- 
cause of poor scholarship: 
Sophomores 
Costenbader, Alvin Benjamin, EE 
Myers, Calvin R., CE 
Schatz. Ralph Edward, AE 

Freshman 

McCreary, Robert Lee, IE 



TUESDAY, February 20 

Liberal Arts Lecture, 7:00 p. m., 
Old Chapel. 

THURSDAY, February 22 

Ladies Night at the University 
Club. Washington's Birthday party, 
with dinner, dancing, and cards. 

SATURDAY, February 24 

Boxing, Penn State vs. University 
of Pennsylvania. 

Club night at University Club. 

SUNDAY, February 25 

Chanel Speaker — Dr. Stanley White, 
Secretary Board of Foreign Missions, 
New York. 

PRACTICE TEACHING 

Sixteen Senior girls who are pursu ■ 
ing the curriculum in Home Econom- 
ies arc spending the first six weeks of 
(he present semester in practice 
teaching in vocational schools in var- 
ious parts of the state. They are 
teaching approximately half time and 
observing during the other half, though 
the schedule varies and some students 
clo more teaching than others depend- 
ing upon the schooi Each student 
is under the supervision of the teach- 
ers of Home Economics in the school 
and is visited once every week or ten 
days by a member of the teacher train- 
ing staff of the college department of 
Home Economics. 

This is the fourth year th:v; tl;l.-; 
type of practice teaching has been 
carried on and the plan has been high- 
ly commended by federal officials and 
national educational organizations. On- 
ly one other institution in the country 
is following a method at all similar to 
that in ue at Pnn State. The depart- 
ment of Home Economics has been 
asked to prepare an account of the 
system for the April number of the 
new Journal of Vocational Education. 



-o— 



LIBERAL ARTS LECTURE 

Tonight's lecture in the "Liberal Arts 
Series will be "Snapshots in Spain" 
by Professor W. K. Jones the talk 
being illustrated by lantern sl'des. 
Next Tuesday evening Dr. Jasoh Tan- 
ger will be the speaker, his sul 'ect be- 
ing "A Budget System for Pennsyl- 
vania." 



FELLOWSHIPS 

The American-Scandinavian Founda- 
tion in April will award to students 
of Americah birth twenty fellowships 
for study in Scandinavian countries 
during the academic year lf'23-24. The 
stipend is $1000 each. Graduate stu- 
dents and younger instructors are es- 
pecially invited to apply. Details may 
be obtained from the office of the Dean 
of Men. 









V: . P . CROCK ETT . 
3 13 '-'AIM I'LPG 






3£S 



Published every Tuesday 
during' the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 



VOLUME 2 



State College, Pa., February 27, 1923 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



NUMBER 22 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

INSTRUCTORS' SCHEDULES 

All members of the teaching staff are 
•eminded of the request that they send 
o the Registrar's Office as soon as pos- 
dble a copy of their actual schedule, 
ndicating the room (number and build- 
ng) in which they are located at any 
fiven time Those who have not as yet 
iomplied with this request are asked to 
five the matter immediate attention. — 
tV. S. Hoffman, Acting-Registrar. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
tudents have left college: 
Junior 
Tomlinson, Isaac S., EE 

Sophomores 
Barndt, Jonas P., For 
Jenkins, Robert, M., CF 
Lilley, Charles S., Mng 
Ward, William J., AE 

Freshmen 
Dombrowski, John J. EE 
Herr, Harry J., Ag 
Loeb, David S., LA 
McCandless, Harry C, Mng 



STUDENTS DROPPED 

At the end of the first semester of the 
current college year the following stu- 
lents have failed to pass in fifty per 
:ent of their scheduled work and are 
herefore dropped from College: 
School of Agriculture 
Juniors 

Cunningham, Newton T., ChA. 

Heffelfinger, Vernon E., For 

Maier, Elmer G., ChA 

Witt, Norman R., ChA 
Sophomores 

Bayard, Theodore R., Hrt. 

Hanna, Mark N., Hrt. 

Johnson, Russel H., For 

Moore, George B., DH 

Prevost, Jules F., For 

Shrum, John B., DH 

Smink, George T„ Ag 

Way, David C, DH 

Whitekettle, Loy A., For 

Whitely, Robert D., For 
Freshmen 

Davis, Cyrus R., Ag 

Dorman, Lester H., Ag 

Douglass, Robert M., Jr., Ag 

Dunbar, Herbert L., Ag 

Edgerton, Charles T., Ag 

Heckendorn, George M., Ag 

Hultz, Earle W., Ag 

Koch, Ellwood, Ag 

MacFarlane, Robert C, Ag 

Zahm, George, Ag 
Special 

'Conway, Ward, Ag 

Two-Year Ag 

Adams, William M., 1st year 

Critzer, A. B., 2nd year 



Dermody, G. R., 1st year 
Dressell, Charles C, 2nd year 
Jackson, A. W. 2nd year 
Kottman, Morton E., 1st year 
Lauder, S. Wayne, 2nd year 
Perry, Arnold L., 2nd year 
Phillips, John C, 1st year 
Scott, John W., 1st year 
Shuman, Howard O., 2nd year 
Smith, Paul N., 1st year 
Soloman, Charles A., 1st year 
Walls, Henry V., 1st year 

Other Freshmen 
Porter, Charlotte, LA 
Price, Harry W., IE 
Stitzer, Brooke R., CF 
Thomas, G. Miner, Ech 



STUDENTS REINSTATED 

The following is a list of students who 
have been reinstated in the School of 
Liberal Arts: 

Junior 
Bechtel, Earl S., CF 

Sophomores 
Armstrong, Joseph, CF 
Lingle, Walter C, PL 
Wieder, Homer W., PL 

Freshmen 
Chambers, Mary, LA 
Heffner, Alice V., LA 
Porter, Charlotte, LA 
The following students who have fail- 
ed in fifty per cent of their work are 
allowed to continue in college on proba- 
tion: 

Freshmen 
Gottschalk, Victor H., ME 
Runkle, William E., EE 

CAMPAIGN BRIEFS 

Before the first mail came in one day 
last week, Professor Espenshade report- 
ed taking in almost $5000 in signed 
pledges. It all came from faculty men 
who had been out in the state on their 
regular college business but who car- 
ried a supply of pledge blanks with 
them and did not hesitate to "sign 'em 
up." 



Professor Orton spent a few days in 
Lehigh county last week and gathered 
alumni pledges totaling $2,530. Pro- 
fessor Nixon took in $4,050 in one day. 



The faculty "wrecking crews" that 
thave been sent in to several counties 
have been sent into several counties 
only securing many signed pledges but 
stimulating the county organizations 
to renewed activity. 

o 

Penn iState wrestling and basketball 
teams will be seen in action in the Ar- 
mory next Saturday. The matmen will 
meet Lehigh while the cagers will take 
on Swarthmore. It is probable that the 
wrestling will be in the afternoon and 
the basketball in the evening. 



CALENDAR 

TUESDAY, February 27 
Liberal Arts Lecture, "A Budget Sys- 
tem for Pennsylvania," by Dr. Jacob 
Tanger, Old Chapel, 7:00. 

SATURDAY, March 8 
Penn State vs. Lehigh, wrestling. 
State — Swarthmore, basketball. See bul- 
letin boards for time. 

SUNDAY, March 4 
Chapel Speaker — Colonel John T. Ax- 
ton, Chief of Chaplains, United States 
Army, Washington, D. C. 

TUESDAY, March <i 
Liberal Arts Lecture, Old Chapel ,7:00 

THE "CAMPAIGN BOOSTER" 
Starting this week members of the 
Faculty will regularly receive copies 
of the "Campaign Booster" which is 
issued each week in the interest of the 
Emergency Building Fund Campaign. 
The Booster contains all the latest in- 
formation regarding the status of the 
campaign and should be of interest to 
every faculty member. It will be sent 
through the manilla mail and should 
reach the various offices some time 
on Wednesday each week. 

STUDIO TEA 

The American Association of Univer- 
sity Women will give a studio tea for 
members and their friends in the Art 
Rooms of Old Main tonight (Tuesday). 
Numerous Holbein prints and paintings 
of O. G. Wales, of Philadelphia are on 
exhibition. Tableaux of famous paint- 
ings will also be given at eight o'clock. 

A silver collection will be taken and 
the proceeds will be given to the Em- 
ergency Building Fund. 

o 

LIBERAL ARTS LECTURE 
The regular Tuesday Evening lecture 
in the Liberal Arts Series will take 
place in Old Chapel tonight. Dr. Jacob 
Tanger will be the speaker, his subject 
being "A Budget System for Pennsyl- 
vania." Next week's lecture will be 
entitled "Present Day Tendencies in 
the Theatre" and will be given by Pro- 
fessor A. C. Cloetingh, director of the 
Penn State Players. 



TO SPEAK AT DINNER 
Governor Pinchot, President Thomas 
and Professor "Jack" White will be the 
leading speakers at a dinner at the 
Penn-Harris Hotel in Harrisburg on 
March 6th to be given by the National 
Agricultural Limestone Association. In 
this connection it might be mentioned 
that a movement is now on foot to 
have the lime interests of the state 
unite in the construction of a dormitory 
unit at Penn State as a memorial to 
the late Dr. William Frear. 



SCHEDULE OF RE-EXAMS 
COMPLETED BY REGISTRAR 

The following- list is the schedule of 
re-examinations for students receiving 
a grade of "D" in courses other than 
Practicum, for the first semester. 

The final examinations will he given 
on Saturday afternoons in March, will 
bo of two hours duration, one begin- 
ning at 1:10 and ending at 3:10, sec- 
ond beginning at 3:20 and ending at 
5:20. 

In the list of examinations given 
below the number of the subject is 
first given, then the date of the day 
in the month of March, then the hour 
and last of all the room, as for in- 
stance: 

Min. 31 is scheduled for March 3, at 
3:20 p. m.. in 104 MngA. 

Conflicts should be reported at once 
to the Assistant Registrar, Professor 
Wm. S. Hoffman. 

AgEd 11, 15. 1C— 17, 3:20, 200 Hort 

Agro 3, 10, 20, 28, 201, 20G— 10, 1:10, 
100 Hort 

Agro 201—10, 3:20. 103 Ag 
AH all courses— 3, 3:20, 100 Hort 

Pact 2—24, 1:10, 251 Dairy 

Bibliog 1—17, 3:20, K Lib 

Pot 1—24, 1:10, 11 CA 

Pot 7, 10, 11, 19, 201—17, 1:10, 100 
Hort 

Chem all courses except 283 — 3, 1:10, 
Amp 

Chem 283—24, 3:10, 11 CA 

ChemAg all courses except 208 — 3, 
1:10, 20G Ag. 

ChemAg 208—3, 3:20, 20G Ag 

Com all courses— 10, 3:10, OC 

DH 5, 8, 10—3, 1:10, 259 Dairy 

DH 201—10, 3:20, 251 Dairy 

DH 211—17, 1:10, 251 Dairy 

DH 212—24, 3:20, 251 Dairy 

DomArt 22, 26, 28, 37, 38—24, 1:10, 

314, 315 Main. 

DomSci all courses— 24, 3:20, 314 

315, Main. 

EchE 2, 5, 12, 15—24, 1:10, 200 EngE 
Econ 1, 14, 15, 21, 35—24, 3:20, 25, 

28. LA. 

Ed, all courses — 10, 3:20, 25, 28, LA 
EE all courses except 12 — 24, 3:20, 

200 EngD. 

EE 12—3, 1:10, 200 EngD. 
ElDes 3—3, 3:20, 202 EngD. 



Engl all courses except 4 — 17, 1:10, 

Amp. 

Engl 4—24, 3:20, Amp 

FM 1, 201—3, 3:20, 103 Ag 

Forest all courses — 10, 3:20, For. 

Fr 11, 13—10, 1:10, OC. 

Fr 23—17, 1:10, 314 Main 

Geol. all courses except 31 — 17, 3:20 

104 MngA. 

Geol 31—10, 3:20, 101 MngA 
German 1, 3, 50—10, 1:10, 25, 28 LA 
Greek— 10, 1:10, 305 Main 
Plist all courses except 15—24, 1:10 

Amp. 

Hist 15—3, 1:10, 28 LA 
HomeEco 24—10, 1:10, 314 Main 
Hort all courses except 202—3, 1:10, 

100 Hort. 

Hort 202—24, 1:10, 104 Hort. 

HtEng all courses- except 4 — 10, 3:20, 

200 EngD 

HtEng 4—17. 3:20, 201 EngC 

Hwy 7—10. 3:20 201 EngA 

Hyd 1, 11, 12, 15,-3, 1:10, 201, 205 

EngA 

Hyd 5—17 1:10. 201 EngA 

Hyg 1,-10, 3:20, 314, 315 Main 

CndArt 75—24, 1:10, 320 Main 

IE 303, 409, 413, 417—17, 3:20, 200 

EngD 

LAreh by appointment 

Latin— 10, 1:10. 305 Main 

Math all courses— 3, 3:20, 11-16 LA 

Mehs 2—24, 3:20, 201, 207 EngA 

Mens 7—17, 1:10. 203, 207 EngA 

MDes 31, 51, 55—17, 1:10, 200 EngD 

Met all courses except 54—10, 1:10, 

104 MngA 

Met 54—3, 1:10, 104 MngA 

MilDrill 1, 3—3, 3:20, 314 Main 

Min 31, 53—3, 3:20, 104 MngA 

Mng all courses— 10, 3:20, 104 MngA 

Phil 1, 5, 8. 20—3, 3:20, 25, 28 LA 

Phys all courses — 17, 3:20, Amp 

PolSci 1, 17, 20—24, 1:10, OC 

PH all courses— 24, 3:20, 200 Hort. 

Psy all courses — 17, 1:10, OC 

RME 1,7—17, 3:20, 209 EngC 

PR 1, 14—10. 1:10, 201, 205 EngA 

RurEcon 1, 201—24, 1:10, 105 Hort 

Shop 131—17, 3:20, 201 EngA 

Soc 2—17, 3:20, 28 LA 

Sp 11. 13, 23—10, 1:10, Amp 

Str 13, 33—3, 1:10, 207 EngA 

Str 31—17 1:10, 201 EngC 

Sur 15, 42—24, 1:10, 200 EngD 

Zool all courses except 366—17, 1:10 

4 McAH 

Zool 366—3, 3:20, 4 McAH 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State Coll 



T 




Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 2 



State College, Pa., March; 6, 1923 



NUMBER 23 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



REVISION MADE IN 

RE -EXAM SCHEDULE 

It has recently been determined that 
re-examinations may be longer than 
two hours in duration, and therefore but 
one re-examination can be given on 
one half day. Consequently it has been 
necessary to revise the schedule of re- 
examinations. 

All re-examinations scheduled for 1:10 
will begin at 1:30 on the same dates 
and in the same rooms as originally 
scheduled. 

All re-examinations scheduled at 3:20 
will be given at 1:30 in the room orig- 
inally scheduled, but on the Tuesday 
afternoon following 1 the Saturday for 
which they were originally scheduled. 
Exceptions 

EE, except 1 and 12, will be given in 
200 Engineering D, on Saturday, March 
10, at 1:30. 

Room Changes Only 



Course 

Agr. Ed. 11, 15, 1 

Agronomy 201 

Chem. 283 

Chem. Agr. 208 

El. Des. 3 

F. M. 1, 201 

Geol., all courses 

Hwy. 7 

Mchs. 2 

Mng. 

Min. 31, 51 

P. H. 

Shop 131 

Zool 366 



Will Be Given in 

6 Amp. 

Amp. 
Amp. 
Amp. 

203 Eng. A. 
315 Main 
200 Mng. A. 
203 Eng. A. 
Old Chapel 
200 Mng. A. 
200 Mng. A. 
100 Hort. 
203 Eng. A. 
Amp. 



WATCH RE-EXAM PERMITS 

The attention of all instructors is 
called to the lists of men published in 
the last two issues of the Bulletin as 
having been dropped from College. 
Many of these men have in their pos- 
session permits entitling them to take 
re-examinations in subjects in which 
they received a grade of D. They are 
not allowed such a privilege since they 
are no longer connected with the Penn- 
sylvania State College— W. S. Hoffman, 
Acting Registrar. 



STUDENTS WTHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 
Sophomores 
Engle, Henry Borr, Hrt 
King, Clare Buckwalter, AE 

Freshman 
Wallace, Wilbert B., CF 
• o 

DROPPED THROUGH ERROR 

Through an error in grade reporting, 
the following students were unfairly in- 



cluded among those dropped from col- 
lege under the fifty per cent rule. They 
are still students in good standing in 
the School of Liberal Arts: 
Junior 
Bechtel, Earl S., CF 
Sophomores 

Armstrong, Joseph, CF 
Lingle, Walter C, PL 
Wieder, Homer W., PL 

STUDENTS REINSTATED 

The following students have been re- 
i .suited in the School of Agriculture: 
Sophomores 

Moore, George, DH 
Whitekettle, Loy A., For 
Two-Year Ag. 

Smith, Paul, 1st year 

o 



CALENDAR 



STUDENTS ON PROBATION 

The following students who have 
failed in fifty per cent of their work 
are allowed to continue in college 
probation: 

Juniors 



on 



Cunningham, Newton T. 
Maier, Elmer G., ChA 
Witt, Norman R., ChA 



ChA 



DONATES LAND TO COLLEGE 

The Penn iState athletic association 
through the athletic advisory committee 
has given the College a clear title to a 
section of land bordering on the west- 
ern boundary of the golf course and 
comprising a total of 22 acres. This 
land was purchased last fall for more 
than $11,000 for the development of the 
present nine-hole golf course into a 
18-hole course and the construction oi 
the same has already been started. The 
land was given to the College to become 
permanent college property and means 
that Penn State will soon have a com- 
plete 18-hole golf course. The gift is 
a most generous one and is in line with 
previous action of the athletic author- 
ities in donating more than $20,000 U 
the college building fund campaign. 



CHANGE OF SCHOOLS 

A total of 107 students have chang- 
ed schools with the opening of the 
second semester, according to figures 
compiled by Acting-Registrar Hoff- 
man. Liberal Arts maintains leader- 
ship, losing but one and gaining 66, 
while Engineering leads the losses with 
46 and gains but seven. Agriculture 
loses 24 and gains 13; Mines loses 
seven and gains five; Natural Science 
loses 10 and gains 12; Home Econom- 
ics loses four and gains none; while 
the Probation section loses 15 and 
gains 4. 



TUESDAY, March 6 

Liberal Arts Lecture, Professor Cloe- 
tingh, Old Chapel, 7:00. 

SATURDAY, March 10 

Athletic events — Penn State vs. V. M. 
I., boxing; Alumni, basketball. See pos- 
ters for time of events. 

Penn State Players at University 
Club. 

SUNDAY, March 11 

No Chapel Speaker. A musical pro- 
gram will be given at the regular chap- 
el services. 

TUESDAY, March L5 

Liberal Arts Lecture, Old Chapel, 
7:00. 

THURSDAY, March 15 

College Senate, Foyer of Auditorium, 
7:30. 

COPIES FOR FACULTY 

All faculty members who are inter- 
ested and desire to secure a copy of the 
latest campaign handbook, "The Faith 
of the State", may do so by calling at 
the President's Office. 

"The Faith of the State" is probably 
the most informative and concisely 
written handbook ever published in the 
interests of the College. It brings out 
in a comprehensive fashion the true 
relationship of Penn State to the Com- 
monwealth of Pennsylvania, tells of the 
service that the College has rendered 
to the State, and indicates what the 
State must do in fulfillment of the 
pledge made to the College in 1863. 



LIBERAL ARTS LECTURE 

The lecture tonight (Tuesday) in the 
Liberal Arts Course will be by Profes- 
sor A. C. Cloetingh, on the subject 
"Present Day Tendencies in the Thea- 
tre." Next Tuesday's lecture will be 
by Dr. W. R. Ham, who will discuss 
"Experimental Evidence For and 
Against the Variation of Mass in a 
Moving Body." 



UNIVERSITY CLUB 

The Penn State Players will be the 
attraction at the University Club on 
Saturday night, and club members, 
wives and partners are invited to at- 
tend. 

o 

BOOK PUBLISHED 

The Longmans, Green and Company 
has just issued a book entitled "History 
of the James River and Kanawha Com- 
pany," written by Professor W. F. Dun- 
away, Ph.D., of the Department of His- 
tory and Political Science at Penn State. 



W.D. CROCKETT , 
3 13 MAIN E L n a 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



VOLUME 2 



State College, Pa., March 13, 1923 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



COLLEGE SENATE 

The regular meeting of the College 
Senate will be held on Thursday even- 
ing of this week at 7:30 in the Foyer of 
the Auditorium. 



LIBERAL ARTS FACULTY 

The regular meeting of the Liberal 
Arts Faculty will be held on Wednes- 
day, March 14, at 4:30 p. m. in room 25 
of' the Liberal Arts Building. — L. V. T. 
Simmons, secretary. 



AGRICULTURAL FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the Agri- 
cultural Faculty at 4:30 on Thursday of 
this week in room 103 Agricultural 
Building. This will be preceded by a 
meeting of the Agricultural Research 
Staff at 3:30 in room 206 Ag.— R. L. 
Watts, dean. 

o — 

STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 

Sophomores 

Fleck, Harold B., EE 
Weining, Harry H., IB 



COUNCIL ACTION 

At its last meeting the Council of 
Administration approved and adopted 
the following recommendations made by 
a special committee appointed by Pres- 
ident Thomas and consisting of Pro- 
fessor Orton, Dean Holbrook, and Dean 
Stoddart: 

First, that the Department of Public 
Information shall be the clearing house 
for all public arid semi-public lectures 
by outside speakers for the purpose of 
giving due publicity to such occasions. 
At the discretion of the Department 
such agencies as the Faculty Bulletin, 
the Collegian, daily papers, Science, and 
other technical periodicals shall be used 
in giving notice of these lectures: 

Second, that so far as possible all 
campus agencies arranging for speak- 
ers shall give notice to the Department 
of Public Information not only of the 
definite appearance of a speaker, his 
name and occupation, the title of his 
talk, the time and place of the lecture, 
but also notice of speakers who are ex- 
pected during the year, so that due pub- 
licity may be given of possibilities. A 
brief note concerning the speaker and 
what he has accomplished, for what he 
is noted, etc., is desirable. 

Third, that official notice of this ac- 
tion be given to all Schools, Depart- 
ments, and organizations in the Facul- 
ty Bulletin and in the Collegian. 

The last home athletic event of the 
indoor season will take place next Sat- 
urday in the Armory with the Syra- 
cuse wrestlers. 



COLLEGE STUDENTS 

IN PENNSYVANIA 

According to a bulletin recently is- 
sued by the Federal Bureau of educa- 
tion, the number of university, college 
and professional students residing in 
Pennsylvania in 1920 — 21 was 34,491 
(not including students attending nor- 
mal schools and independent theological 
schools). This number is exceeded only 
by New York, which has 49,282 college 
students. 

Of this total number of college stu- 
dents in Pennsylvania, 27,412 (or 79.2 
per cent) attend Pennsylvania colleges, 
and 7,079 (or 20.8 per cent) go to uni- 
versities and colleges situated outside 
the state. 

The number of students attending 
the universities and colleges of Penn- 
sylvania is 36,262. In this respect, also, 
Pennsylvania is exceeded only by New 
York, whose colleges have 55,130 stu- 
dents in attendance. Of the 36,262 stu- 
dents in Pennsylvania colleges, 8,259 
(or 24.5 per cent) come from outside 
the state. This is 1,180 in excess of 
the number of Pennsylvanians who go 
outside of their own state for their col- 
lege education. 

In the number of students attending 
college in proportion to its population, 
Pennsylvania stands twenty-seventh, 
with one college student to every 253 
persons in the state. In this respect, 
the District of Columbia stands first, 
with one college student to every 96 
persons; and Tennessee last, with one 
student for each 604 persons. 

These compilations were made for the 
Bulletin by Professor A. H. Espenshade. 

o 

BUSINESS MAN'S LUNCH 

For the accommodation of faculty 
members and their friends, the Uni- 
versity Club is now prepared to serve 
a fifty cent business man's lunch at 
12:30 every week day in the small din- 
ing room of the clubhouse. Short no- 
tice to Mr. Clayton, the steward, will 
secure prompt service. 



INTERESTING FIGURES 

An interesting comparison of the en- 
rollment in the various engineering 
courses at five Pennsylvania engineer- 
ing colleges was recently made out by 
Acting Registrar W. S. Hoffman. The 
figures were based on reports for the 
year- 1920-21. 

Eng. Mng. Chem. Total 



Penn State 

Pitt 

Penn 

Lehigh 

Lafayette 



1101 157 71 1329 

288 158 75 621 

399 39 438 

590 94 4 688 

261 9 9 279 



As may be seen from the figures, the 
enrollment in the School of Engineer- 
ing at Penn State was 1329, which is 
greater than the combined enrollment 
at Pitt and Penn of 959, with Lafayette 
thrown in for good measure. 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



NUMBER 24 



CALENDAR 



TUESDAY, March 13 

Liberal Arts Lecture, Old Chapel, 
7:00. 

WEDNESDAY, March 14 

Liberal Arts faculty meeting, 4:30, 
room 25 L. A. 

THURSDAY, March 15 

Agricultural Research Staff meeting, 
3:30, 206 Ag. 

Agricultural Faculty meeting, 4:30, 
103 Ag. 

College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Audi- 
torium. 

FRIDAY, March 16 

Card party and smoker for members 
at University Club. 

Varsity debate with George Washing- 
ton University Law School, 8:00, Audi- 
torium. 

SATURDAY, March 17 

Wrestling, Penn State vs. Syracuse. 
Musical Course number, Paul Alt- 
house, tenor, Auditorium, 8:15. 
SUNDAY, March 18 

Chapel Speaker — H. Wellington Wood, 
lecturer, of Philadelphia. 

TUESDAY, March 20 

Liberal Arts Lecture, Old Chapel, 
7:00. 

LIBERAL ARTS LECTURE 

Tonight's lecture in the Liberal Arts 
series will be by Dr. W. R. Ham, on the 
topic "Experimental Evidence for and 
against the Variation of Mass in a 
Moving Body." Next week's lecture 
by Dr. R. H. Dotterer, will be "The Re- 
sponse of Philosophy to Einstein." 



UNIVERSITY CLUB 

On Friday night of this week a St. 
Patrick's Day card party and smoker 
for club members only will be held at 
the University Club. Light refresh- 
ments will be served. Saturday night 
will be club night. 



PRACTICE GARDENS 

Faculty members who desire to pur- 
chase student gardens, 30 by 50 feet, 
for $8.00, are asked to notify the Veg- 
etable Gardening office not later than 
April first, as these gardens will be 
placed on general sale at that time. 
The Vegetable Gardening Division cul- 
tivates these gardens during the sum- 
mer and purchasers remove the vege- 
tables as they ripen. 



VARSITY DEBATE 

The varsity debating team will meet 
a team from the George Washington 
University Law School in the Auditor- 
ium on Friday evening of this week 
at 8:00. The subject will deal with the 
Kansas Industrial Court. 



W . D . CROCKETT , 
313 MAIN 3LPG 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 2 



State College, Pa., March 20, 1923 



NUMBER 25 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



BELOW GRADES 

Below grades for the eight-week per- 
iod are clue at the offices of the various 
deans on March -6. — W. iS. Hoffman, 
Acting Registrar. 

FACULTY CAMPAIGNERS 

Faculty members who will volunteer 
for campaign canvassing in any county 
of the State during the Easter holidays 
are urged to see Mr. Espenshade in 
the Headquarters Office as soon as pos- 
sible. Why not arrange with one or 
more of your colleagues to go as a 
team to some county and put the cam- 
paign across? Faculty canvassers have 
proven the best. A good many others 
have volunteered. Why not You J 



OX INSPECTION TRIP 

The following list of students in In- 
dustrial Engineering are required to 
make the spring inspection trip begin- 
ning at noon, March 21, and ending the 
evening of March 23. All their in- 
structors have been notified but in case 
any have been omitted through error, 
the list of names will serve as notifi- 
cation : 

Amour, H. C. Miller, Eldridge 

Anderson, R. JV. .Newman, K. C. 

Bailey, E. R. " Peters, R. L. 

Butler, T. E. Parsons, C. W. 

Euwer, H. D. Reeder, D. G. 

Fleck, D. C. Roberts, T. B. 

Dowler, A. P. Robinson, PI. 1. 

Forncrook, L. M. Ross, C. H. 

Foster, J. C. Schive, E. D. 

Haas, R. G. Shore, W. M. 

Hawk, D. E. Silverman, I. E. 

Hecker, F. W. Stouffer, R. N. 

Houser, A. K. Van Orsdell, E. ;C. 

McCandless, L. N. Watkins, B. E. 
Marshall, G. A. Weinstein, C. 

Wilson, H. M. 

SCHOOL LUNCH 

Beginning yesterday, School Lunch 
will be served at the Wj° mens Building 
at 12:15 every day but Saturday. Fac- 
ulty members who are unable to get 
home for a hot lunch or who desire a 
dainty and attractive noon meal at 
practically cost price may be glad to 
avail themselves of this opportunity. 



UNIVERSITY CLUB 

Ladies Night will be celebrated at the 
University Club on Friday night of this 
week. The party will be formal, with 
dinner, dancing and cards. Music will 
be furnished by Griffith's Orchestra. The 
patronesses will be Mrs. R. W. Grant, 
Mrs. R. I. Webber, and Mrs. F. D. Gard- 
ner. Reservations for dinner must be 
made with Mr. Clayton not later than 
tomorrow (Wednesday). Saturday night 
will be Club Night. 



EDUCATIONAL POLICY FOR 

STATE WELL RECEIVED 

Involving an economical program and 
the logical use of the Pennsylvania 
State College, as an existing State-own- 
ed educational institution, the policy 
for a higher educational program re- 
commended by Dr. John M. Thomas, 
president of the college, which he an- 
nounced recently through a requested 
communication to Governor Pinchot, 
has aroused much favorable comment 
through the state. 

President Thomas opposes a policy 
that would involve more than one State 
University, especially since it is nec- 
essary that the State support adequate- 
ly its one institution of higher learn- 
ing — State College — before undertaking 
to support the three advocated under 
an old plan. 

Under his proposal, appropriations 
would be continued to institutions which 
have received them until they can ad- 
just their budgets; private intitiative 
would be relied upon for professional 
schools, such as law and medicine, un- 
til the demand arises for such schools, 
administered by the state; a school of 
education especially for the training of 
high school teachers should be estab- 
lished. 

Finally, the recommendation would 
have the fulfillment of "the obligation 
of the State to the Pennsylvania State 
College by developing the institution 
naturally and in accordance with its 
character as a land grant college into 
a State University of the western 
type." Adequate maintenance support 
and a bond issue providing $1,000,000 
a year for eight years for buildings, 
are important recommendations. 



A RC H ITE CTURAU CON FE REN CE 

Members of the Department of Archi- 
tecture had an all-day conference last 
Tuesday on methods of teaching de. 
scriptive geometry. Professor Ervin 
Kenison, Associate Professor of De- 
scriptive Geometry at the Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology, gave sev- 
eral very interesting talks. 

The section in descriptive geometry 
which meets regularly at 1:30 on Tues- 
days, was favored with having Profes- 
sor Kenison deliver the regularly as- 
signed lecture. Professor Kenison, to. 
gether with Professor Bradley of the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
is the author of the text book used in 
descriptive geometry at Penn State. 



LIBERAL ARTS LECTURE 

The lecture tonight (Tuesday) in the 
Liberal Arts Series will be by Dr. R. H. 
Dotterer on the subject "The Response 
of Philosophy to Einstein." A change 
has been made in the program for next 
Tuesday night, Dean Holbrook chang- 
ing places with Dr. Woodruff. Dean 
Holbrook will speak on "Research." 



CALENDAR 



TUESDAY, March 20 

Liberal Arts Lecture, Old Chapel, 
7:00. 

FRIDAY, March 23 

Ladies Night at University Club. 
Interscholastic basketball tourna- 
ment. 

SATURDAY, March 21 

Interscholastic basketball final for 
Suite championship. Armory. 

SUNDAY, March 25 

Chapel Speaker — Bishop F. J. McCon- 
i :<_'ll , Pittsburgh, Pa. 



MUSICAL WEEK 

Tickets fur the series of concerts to 
lie given under the auspices of the Fed- 
eration of Music Clubs of Pennsylvania 
lo be held during the state conference 
in State College, April 10, 11, and 12, 
are now on sale at the office of the Di- 
rector of College Music, and in the Y. 
M. C. A. Hut. The price is $1.50 for 
the entire course. Six concerts will be 
held, one each afternoon and evening, 
and the admission price of each will be 
fifty cents except for the Mme. Olga 
Samaroff concert on the evening of 
April 11 when the charge will be $1.00, 
almost the price of a ticket for the en- 
tire course. 

Features on the program other than 
the concert by Samaroff, who is one of 
the foremost women pianists on the 
modern stage, are concerts by the com- 
bined musical clubs of the College, an 
afternoon of song by Mme. Marguerite 
Sylva, mezzo.soprano, aided by Robert 
Armbruster, pianist, and a concert on 
the final evening by the prize winner of 
the Young Artists' contest. 

The contest for young artists will be 
conducted each morning and will be 
open to the public free of charge pro- 
vided there is no applause. 



SCHOLASTIC BASKETBALL 

The annual interscholastic basketball 
tournament for the championship of 
Pennsylvania will be held in the Ar- 
mory next Friday and Saturday. Four 
teams, representing the various sections 
of the State, will come to Penn State 
as guests of the athletic authorities and 
will battle for the scholastic title. The 
semi-finals will be played on Friday 
night, while the finals will be held 
either Saturday afternoon or evening. 
This will be the final home athletic 
event until the opening of the baseball 
season on April 7. 



The General Catalogue of the College 
is rapidly nearing completion by the 
printer and it is hoped to have the new 
edition here by the time College reopens 
after the Easter holidays. 






W. D. CROCKETT , 
3 13 MAIN BLDG. 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 2 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



NEXT BULLETIN" 

Due to the Easter Holidays there will 
be no issue of the Faculty Bulletin 
next Tuesday. The next issue will be 
on Tuesday, April 10. 



REGARDING ABSENCES 

All members of the teaching staff 
should refuse to admit to class students 
who are absent either 24 hours before 
jor after vacation until they present 
an excuse from the Committee of 
Ceans for the absence. No other ex- 
'cuse should be accepted. The regular 
5.00 fine is in effect for absences at 
this time. 



PROBATION SECTION 

The following men are registered in 
the Probation Section in charge of 
bean Warnock for the current semes- 
ter. Below grade reports should be sent 
to the office of the Dean of Men: 
R. W. Acheson, A. D. Stevens, 

P. D. Brecker, K. M. Small, 

E. R. Brooks, L. H. Robmson 

D. V. Feaster, W. H. Parsons, 

R. iS. Floyd, C. R. Madera, 

C. M. Torrence 



PLEDGE BLANKS 

A number of faculty members are 
planning to do canvassing work for 
the building fund campaign in their 
nome counties during the vacation per- 
ud. Whether or not you have signed 
up for such work, why not take a doz- 
en or so pledge blanks along with you 
and make use of them at the first op- 
portunity? It will help to get that sec- 
ond million 1 for Penn State. . 



SPECIAL TRAIN 



The only extra train that will be in 
service tomorrow at the start of the 
vacation will be the 0113 leaving Le- 
mont at six o'clock in the evening for 
Sunbury. This train will make stops 
at Lewisburg, Montandon, and North- 
umberland, and will arrive in Sunbury 
in time to connect with trains for 
Wilkes-Barre and Harrisburg. No spe- 
cial arrangements have been made for 
the return following vacation. 



PINAL ¥. M. C. A. NUMBER 

The final number of this year's en- 
tertainment program arranged by the 
Y. M. C. A. and the department of mu- 
sic, will be held in the Auditorium on 
Friday, April 6, at S : 00 o'clock. This is 
the night following the reopening of 
college after the holidays. Strickland 
SiHllan, humorist, is the final attrac- 
tion. 



State College, Pa., March 27, 1923 



COLLEGE BILLS NOW IN 

HANDS OF LEGISLATURE 

Two measures of prime importance 
to Penn State were introduced in the 
State Legislature last week. The first 
was an appropriation bill introduced into 
the House by Representative Tom Bea- 
ver, of Centre County, and the second 
was a joint resolution for an $8,000,000 
bond issue to provide buildings, intro- 
duced in the Senate by Senator W. I. 
Betts, of Clearfield. 

The appropriation bill was as fol- 
lows: For general maintenance, 1923- 
'25, the sum of $3,200,352. For agricul- 
ture ana home economics extension, 
$oo0,o0o, and lor engineering and min- 
ing extension, $90,000, a total of $590,000. 
For summer sessions, 1923 and 1924, 
including salaries, materials, supplies, 
and equipment, $71,040. This makes 
the total called for by the bill $3,861,392. 

Uhe bond issue for $8,000,000 is de- 
signed to provide necessary buildings 
las follows: Agriculture, $2,040,000, En- 
gineering, $1,290,000; Mining, $650,000; 
Education and Liberal Arts, $900,000; 
Natural Science, $1,500,000; Home Ec- 
onomics, $600,000; Administration, Li- 
brary addition, power house, stores and 
shops, $1,020,000. The joint resolution 
must be passed by the legislature this 
year and in 1925 and would then be 
voted on in the general election, No- 
vember, 1925, as an amendement to the 
State Constitution. If passed at that 
time, the bonds could be issued im- 
mediately, and the building program 
could be started in the spring of 1926. 



CON CERJS IIS G ESTIMATES 

Some misunderstandings have re- 
cently arisen concerning bills from the 
Industrial Engineering Department for 
orders upon which previous estimates 
had been given. The department can 
not stand back of any estimate unless 
it is given through the main office, 203 
Engineering C. Estimates will be giv- 
en on any work but only through the 
main office, and the department will ab- 
solutely stand back of any written es- 
timate given out at 203 Engineering C 
and signed by either Professor Beese 
or Professor Keller. Signs have been 
placed in the shop office requesting per- 
sons to handle all business transac- 
tions at the main office. 

The department has on hand some 
rice student tables for $9.00, some li- 
brary tables for $6.50, and different 
kinds of single pedestal desks at var- 
ious prices. These articles can be ob- 
tained in any oak finish and examina- 
tion can be made before purchasing. — 
J. O. Keller, head of department. 



UNIVERSITY CLUB 
There will be no social program at 
the University Club during the holi- 
days. Club night will be celebrated on 
Saturday evening, April 7. 



NUMBER 26 



CALENDAR 



TUESDAY, March 27 
Liberal Arts Lecture, Old Chapel, 
7 :00 p. m. 

WEDNESDAY, March 28 
Easter Recess begins 5:20 p. m. 

SUNDAY, April 1 
There will be no college chapel on 
Easter Day. 

THURSDAY, April 5 
Easter recess ends 8:00 a. 111. 

FRIDAY, April 6 
Strickland Gillilan, final Y. M. 
course number, Auditorium, 8:00. 
SATURDAY, April 7 
Baseball, Penn State vs. Susquehan- 
na, New Beaver, 2:30. 
Club night at University Club. 

SUNDAY, April 8 
Chapel Speaker — The Reverend Dr. 
D. Brewer Eddy, of Boston, Mass. 
TUESDAY, April 10 
Liberal Arts Lecture, Old Chapel, 
7:00. 



C. A. 



ART EXHIBIT 
The Art Editor of the Saturday 
Evening Post has agreed to send a loan 
exhibition of 50 original Saturday 
Evening Post illustrations to the De- 
partment of Architecture during the 
first two weeks of April. Members of 
the faculty will recall with interest 
former exhibits that have come to the 
College from the iCurtis Publishing Com- 
pany, and the present exhibition prom- 
ises to be equally attractive. The ex- 
hibit will be in the Art Musjum, second 
floor of Old Main. 

— o 

SCHOLARSHIP DAY 

In order to avoid conflict between the 
evening exercises in connection with 
Scholarship Day and the program of 
the Pennsylvania Federation of Music 
Clubs, It has been decided to postpone 
Scholarship Day from April 10 to April 
17. iThe musical conference will be held 
here April 10, 11, and 12. 



USED PIANO WANTED 

The Department of Public Informa- 
tion would like to rent a used upright 
piano in good condition, for use at the 
radio broadcasting studio. Any one 
knowing of such a piano for rent, with 
privilege of buying if found satisfactory, 
please notify D. M. Cresswell, at Cam- 
paign Headquarters. 

■ -o - 

The final lecture of the Liberal Arts 
Series is scheduled for Tuesday evening, 
April 10, when Professor E. C. Wood- 
ruff will speak on the subject "What 
Do You Want to Know About Radio?" 
The lecture will be accompanied by a 
demons ration. Tonight's lecture will be 
by Dean Holbrook on "Research". 



W.P.CROCKETT. 
313 WAIN BLDG. 






Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 2 



State College, Pa., April 10, 1923 



NUMBER 27 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the follow- 
ing students have left college: 
Seniors 
Baughman, Robert I., Ch 
Creighton, Mattie, ChA 

Juniors 
Cunningham, Newton, ChA 
Goldberg, Jacob M., CE 

Sophomores 
Dingwall, Alvin Y., EE 
Keller, Leslie H., Hrt 
Kratz, Earl B., CF 
Shrum, John B., DH 

Freshmen 

Applegate, Ralph, Ech 
Blowers, Robert G. ( EE 
Coll, Vincent E., CF 
Edgerton, Charles F., Ag 
Metrinko, John, CE 
Porter, Charlotte R., LA 
Schatz, Ralph E., AE 
Shambaugh, Clara R., LA 
Van Vine, Charles G., CE 

Two-Year Ags 

McDowell, Norman, 1st year 
Neely, George P., 2nd year 
Twilley, James O., 2nd year 



RECOMMEND $2,903,911 

FOR STATE COLLEGE 

The much-hoped-for report of the 
special committee of the State Coun- 
cil of Education dealing with appro- 
priations for higher education in the 
State was made public recently when 
it was transmitted through Governor 
Pinchot to the House Appropriations 
Committee. It recommended a total 
appropriation of $2,993,914 for Penn 
State, $1,641,312 for the University of 
Pennsylvania; $1,200,960 for the Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh; and $270,000 for 
Temple University. 

Governor Pinchot expressed his ap- 
proval of the recommendations and 
stated that if the Legislature should 
decide to provide sufficient funds by 
means of new taxation he would be 
glad to sign the measures. 

The committee reached its total 
amounts by adding a flat 20 per cent., 
increase to the 1921-23 appropriation 
to Penn State, Penn and Pitt, with an 
additional amount to each institution 
specifically for salary increases among 
the faculty. They made the latter pro- 
vision after stating it as their finding 
that the majority of teachers were 
decidedly underpaid. The amount 
asked for Penn State for this purpose 
is $291,594. 

The committee also requested a spe- 
cific appropriation of $100,000 to Penn 
State for agricultural research work. 
The remainder of the amount recom- 
mended for Penn State, $2,602,320, 
must take care of agricultural exten- 
sion, engineering and mining exten- 
sion, and the Summer Sessions of 1923 



and 1924, in addition to general main- 
tenance for two years. The committee 
was unable to outline a policy for 
higher education, stating- that there 
was not sufficient time allowed for 
them to take up the many different 
angles that must be considered in lay- 
ing down such a policy. 

SCHOLARSHIP DAY 

Scholarship Day will be celebrated 
next Tuesday, April 17. The exercis- 
es will be held in the Auditorium, start- 
ing at 10:20 a. m., and all classes will 
be dismissed for that hour, and if ne- 
cessary, for the succeeding one. The 
Scholarship Day address will be deliv- 
ered by Dr. Emory W. Hunt, president 
of Bucknell University. 

The program will include organ se- 
lections by Mrs. Grant, announcement 
of the scholarship awards, announce- 
ment of elections to the various honor 
societies, presentation of the Honor 
Society Council Medals, and the ad- 
dress by Dr. Hunt. 

Members of all honor societies will 
hold a meeting at the University Club 
at 8:00 the same evening. 



TO HOLD JOINT MEETING 

A joint meeting of the American As- 
sociation for the Advancement of Sci- 
ence, Sigma Xi, and Phi Kappa Phi 
will be held in Old Chapel at 7:00 on 
Friday evening, April 20. This was 
previously announced for Thursday. 
The program for the evening will in- 
clude an address by Herman Stabler 
of the United States Geological Sur- 
vey on "The Canyons of the Colorado 
River." 

Mr. Stabler is one of the party se- 
lected by Secretary Herbert Hoover 
to make an investigation of the Col- 
orado River with a view to selecting 
sites for dams to develop water pow- 
er and provide irrigation for a great 
territory now uncultivated. (The pho- 
tographs taken on the trip are the fin- 
est so far produced. Many portions of 
the river had never before been tra- 
versed by a white man. 

Professor J. E. De Camp will dis- 
cuss "The Mental Tests at State Col- 
lege" which have been given by the 
Department of Education and Psycho- 
logy, and an analysis of this work 
will be of scientific interest. Mem- 
bers of the three societies are invited 
to meet Mr. Stabler at dinner at the 
University Club at 6:00. Those de- 
siring to do so are asked to advise 
Dean Sackett's office not later than 
April 17. 



-o- 



UNIVERSITY CLUB 

A formal reception to Music Con- 
vention delegates will be held at the 
University Club tomorrow (Wednesday) 
evening at 9:30. This will follow the 
recital by Madame Samaroff. All 
members and their wives are invited. 
Saturday night will be Club Night. 



CALENDAR 

TUESDAY, April 10 

Liberal Arts Lecture, Old Chapel, 
7:00. 

Opening concert of Music Conven- 
tion, Auditorium, 8:15. 

AVEDNESDAY, April 11 

Concert, Mme. Samaroff, Auditor- 
ium, 8:15. 

THURSDAY, April 12 

Concert, Mme. Sylva, Auditorium, 
4:00. 

Concert, Young Artists, Auditorium, 
8:15. 

SATURDAY, April 11. 

Lacrosse, Penn State vs. Univ. of 
Pennsylvania, New Beaver, 2:30. 

Club night at University Club. 
SUNDAY, April 15 

Chapel Speaker — The Reverend Dr. 
Raymon M. Kistler, First Presbyterian 
Church, Warren, Pa. 

TUESDAY, April 17 

Scholarship Day exercises, Auditor- 
ium, 10:20 a. m. 

Meeting of Honor Societies, Univer- 
sity Club, S:00. 

THUESDAY, April 19 

College Senate, Foyer of Auditorium, 
7:30. 

MUSIC WEEK 

The annual convention of the Penn- 
sylvania. Federation of Music Clubs 
opens here today and will continue 
through Thursday. The opening con- 
cert will be in the Auditorium this 
evening at 8:15 and will be given by 
the combined Musical Clubs of Penn 
State. This will be followed by a re- 
ception by the Woman's Club to be 
held at the President's Plouse. . 

At two o'clock Wednesday afternoon 
there will be a concert by State Club 
Artists, while a feature of the conven- 
tion will be the recital by Mme. Olga 
Samaroff, pianist, at 8:15 in the even- 
ing. A reception at the University 
Club will follow. 

Following a luncheon at McAllister 
Hall at 1:45 on Thursday, there will 
be a recital by Mme. Marguerite Sylva, 
soprano, assisted by Robert Armbrus- 
ter, pianist, at 4:00 in the Auditorium. 
Winners of the Young Artists' Contest 
will give the evening concert at 8:15. 

The contest for young artists will 
take place in the mornings. The con- 
test for pianists is today, for violin- 
ists Wednesday, and for vocalists 
Thursday. 



FINAL L. A. LECTURE 

The final number of the Liberal Arts 
Lecture Series will be given in Old 
Chapel tonight (Tuesday) by Professor 
E. C. Woodruff. The subject is "What 
Do You Want to Know About Radio?" 
and the lecture will be accompanied by 
a demonstration. 



. . . c : 



■ . 



■ ; i :: i lp 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 2 



State College, Pa., April 17, 1923 



NUMBER 28 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

COLLEGE SEX ATE 

The regular meeting of the College 
Senate will take place on Thursday 
evening at 7:30 in the Foyer of the 
Auditorium. 



AGRICULTURAL FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the Ag- 
ricultural Faculty on Thursday of this 
week at 4:30 in room 103 Ag. Build- 
ing. This will be preceded by a meet- 
ing of the Agricultural Research Staff 
it 3:30 in room 206, Ag'.— R. L. Watts, 
Jean . 



TO ALL FACULTY MEMBERS 

I desire to call the attention 
of members of the Faculty who 
counsel with students as to el- 
ective subjects during the Junior 
and Senior years to the desira- 
bility of increasing the enroll- 
ment in the advanced course of 
the R. O. T. C. I know it is the 
desire of the Trustees to em- 
phasize the military training of- 
fered by the College and to in- 
crease the number of graduates 
who prepare themselves for com- 
missions to the Officers' Reserve 
Corps, for which the advanced 
course is essential. 

We hope that in the near fu- 
ture the College will be enrolled 
in the list of distinguished in- 
stitutions as recognized by the 
War Department, and this honor 
can not be achieved unless there 
is a good enrollment in the ad- 
vanced course. Aside fd'om the 
educational advantages of the 
course, the above facts should be 
taken into consideration. 

JOHN M. THOMAS 



MASTER'S DEGREE THESES 

Those members of the instructional 
taff who are registered for graduate 
tudy and expect to receive the Mas- 
er's Degree at the June Commence- 
nent should note that the thesis, ap- 
iroved by the major department, must 
e submitted to the Dean of the Grad- 
ate School two weeks prior to Com- 
mencement Day. The date for this 
ear is May 30. If the thesis is not 
eceived by this date no assurance can 
e given that the degree will be con- 
erred at this Commencement, since 
here may not be sufficient time for 
ommittee, faculty, and senate action. 

Heads of departments who have 
raduate students completing their 
wk should call the attention of those 
tudents to this matter. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
students have left college : 
Juniors 
Antrim, Paul B., EiE 
Rossbach, Charles H., CE 
Wilson, George W., IE 
Witt, Norman R., ChA 

Sophomores 
Knouse, Guy H., EE 
Laskaris, Lyeurgis, IE 

Freshmen 
Ensminger, Hilda J., HE 
Goldberg, Jacob M., CF 
Hammett, Alfred K., AE 
Townsend, James R., Mng 
Trout, Harry P., CF 
Zahn, George, Ag 

Two-Year Ag'. 
McDowell, James, 1st year 

PENN STATE PLAYERS 

The Penn State Players will pre- 
sent John Masefield's tragedy of old 
Japan, "(The Faithful", in the Auditor- 
ium on Friday night of this week at 
8:15. This will be their big perform- 
ance of the year and no effort or mon- 
ey is being spared to make it the great- 
est production as yet undertaken by 
the Players. 

The play is based on an ancient 
Japanese legend. It is chuck full of 
the romantic spirit of the Orient, is 
exceedingly colorful, and intensely 
dramatic. The cast will include some 
of the best actors so far developed by 
the Players. The play will be staged 
purely in the expressionistic manner, 
the newest thing on Broadway and so 
far never seen in State College. Fac- 
ulty members who enjoyed "The 
Witching Hour" are sure to enjoy 
"The Faithful." 

Due to the heavy expense of stag- 
ing, the price of admission has been 
advanced to 50c, 75c, and $1.00 for 
this performance. Tickets will be on 
sale Wednesday evening at 7:00 at 
the Athletic Store and at the box of- 
fice on the night of the performance. 
Faculty members may also secure 
them by mail from Professor W. K. 
Jones, G31 W. College Avenue. 



CALENDAR 



HONOR SOCIETIES 

Members of all Honor Societies are 
asked to meet in the Foyer of the Audi- 
torium this morning (Tuesday) at 10:15 
preceding the Scholarship Day exer- 
cises. 



MICHIGAN ALUMNI 

A Michigan Banquet will be held 
at the Woman's Building on Tuesday 
evening, April 24. All graduates of 
the University of Michigan are invit- 
ed to secure details from Dr. Mar- 
quardt at the Registrar's Office or from 
Mr. Olmstead at the Y. M. C. A. Office. 



TUESDAY, April 17 

Scholarship Day exercises, Auditor- 
ium, 10:20 a. m. 

Meeting of Honor Societies, Univer- 
sity Club, S:00 p. m. 

THURSDAY, April 1!) 

Ag. Research Staff meeting, 3:30, 
room 20G Ag. 

Ag. Faculty meeting, 4:30, room 
103 Ag. 

College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Au- 
ditorium. 

FRIDAY, April 20 

Baseball, Penn State vs. Bueknell, 
4:00. 

Lecture on Colorado River, Old 
Chapel, 7:00. 

Penn State Players, Auditorium,8:15. 

SATURDAY, April 21 

Baseball, Penn State vs. Bueknell, 
2:30. 

Musical program at University Club 
in evening. 

SUNDAY, April 22 

Chapel Speaker— Dr. Floyd W. 
Tomkins, The Church of the Holy 
Trinity, Philadelphia. 



OPEN MEETING 



Members of the Faculty and others 
interested are invited to attend the 
joint meeting of the American Associ- 
ation for the Advancement of Science, 
Sigma Xi, Phi Kappa Phi, and the 
combined Engineering Societies on Fri- 
day evening* of this week at 7:00 in 
Old Chapel. Herman Stabler, Chief 
of the Bureau of Land, Washington, 
D. C, will give an illustrated talk on 
"The Canyons of the Colorado River" 
and Professor J. E. DeCamp will des- 
cribe the mental tests which have been 
given to Penn State students. 

The meeting will be over before the 
Penn State Players' performance be- 
gins. 



UNIVERSITY CLUB 

A musical program will be given at 
the University Club on Saturday night 
by members of the Music Section of 
the Women's Club. This was previous- 
ly announced for Friday night. Club 
members, wives, and partners are in- 
vited and a buffet lunch will be served. 

o 

WOMEN'S COMMITTEE 

Three additional members have beer, 
added to the Women's Committee of 
the Building Fund Campaign. They 
are Mrs. R. L. Sackett, Miss Edith P. 
Chace, and Miss Pearl MacDonald. The 
criginal committee was composed of 
Miss Charlotte E. Ray, chairman, Mrs. 
A. S. Hurrell, and Miss Lucretia V. T. 
Simmons. 



V/. D. CROCKETT, 

3 13 K A I N BID Q 



Published every Tuesday 
during' the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



VOLUME 2 



The Pennsylvania State 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 
Juniors 
Hauser, Clarion S., ME. 
Mayers, Karl F., EE 
Freshmen 
Bitner, J. William, ChA 
Fuller, Herbert R., ME 
Hughes, Gerald E., RMB 
Long, Isaac M., CE 
Specials 
Clark, John I., NS 
Kriebel, Norman iS., Ag. 

Henry B. Erb, a member of the Jun- 
ior Class in the Dairy Husbandry 
course, was killed in an automobile ac- 
cident during the Easter holidays. 

o 

NEW CATALOGS 

The new college catalog, under date 
of April 1, 1923, lias arrived and mem- 
bers of the Faculty who have not al- 
ready secured a copy may do so by call- 
ing at the Registrar's Office. There 
are several new features of arrange- 
ment in this year's catalog, which was 
printed by the H. C. Dunmire Printing 
Company, of Altoona. 



NO CHARGE ACCOUNTS 

In order to avoid the handling of a 
large number of charge accounts, all 
products of the various departments of 
the School of Agriculture will be sold 
entirely on a cask basis after May first. 

o ■ 

SENATE ACTION 

The following action was taken by 
the College Senate at its last meet- 
ing: 

"When a student is dropped under 
the fifty per cent rule he may be re- 
instated only by action of the Dean of 
the School in which he was enrolled 
with the approval of the President of 
the College; 

"The letter of dismissal which is 
sent in case of a student dropped un- 
der the fifty per cent, rule shall not 
contain any statement which will hold 
out the possibility of reinstatement, 
nor shall the letter sent at that time 
to the family of the student contain 
such statement." 



GRADUATE REQUIREMENTS 

At the March meeting of the College 
Senate the following requirements for 
admission to the Graduate School were 
adopted : 

1. The Bachelor's degree or its equiv- 
alent, from the Pennsylvania State Col- 
lege or from an institution of equally 
high rank shall be required of all per- 
auas lor aamias^on to candidacy for a 




State College, Pa., April 24, 1923 



degree. 

2. At the present time it is proposed 
to consider the case of each applicant 
for admission to the Graduate School 
on its merits, but it is expected at a 
later day to present a more definite 
program and a detailed list of institu- 
tions whose degrees will be accepted at 
lull value by this College. 

3. An undergraduate student acking 
for graduation not more than one sub- 
ject of three or four credits, may be 
admitted to the Graduate School, re- 
ceiving full residence credit. Such stu- 
dent may not be admitted to candidacy 
for a degree until he shall have receiv- 
ed his Bachelor's degree. 

3. An undergraduate student lacking- 
more than one subject or more than 
Lour hours credit for graduation may 
not be admitted to the Graduate School, 
but may register with his scheduling 
officer for graduate work so far as his 
schedule permits. Advanced graduate 
credits thus obtained shall not operate 
to shorten the year's residence require- 
ment for which all candidates for ad- 
vanced degrees are held. 

5. That four summer sessions (aggre- 
gating at least 32 weeks) be regarded as 
the equivalent of one academic year. 

6. That in subjects, which may be 
taken with undergraduate students for 
graduate credit, additional work may be 
required and that the reference now in 
the catalog that such subjects may be 
taken only as minors be dropped. 

7. That the thesis shall represent an 
equivalent of at least six credit hours 
in addition to the 24 credits. 

PROF. PATTEE'S NEW BOOIi 

Much favorable criticism has been 
aroused in literary circles by the pub- 
lication of Professor F. L. Pattee's lat- 
est book, 'History of the American 
Short Story," by Harper's. This most 
recent contribution by Professor Pattee, 
together with his "Sidelights on Amer- 
ican Literature" published last fall, 
carries him well to the front among 
the authorities on American Literature. 



SUMMER HOMES 

The Y. M. C. A. has received a num- 
ber of inquiries for furnished rooms 
and houses during the summer months. 
Those who know of places that will be 
available will confer a favor on others 
by notifying the Hut. 



The Engineering School has been in- 
vited to confer with the National In- 
dustrial Conference Board of New York 
concerning the engineering instruction 
and particularly the extension, instruc- 
tion, being given by Penn State. The 
National Industrial Conference Board 
is an organization of the largest indus- 
tries of the country for the study of 
industrial conditions and hag just re- 
cently taken up technical education. 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



NUMBER 29 



CALENDAR 

FRIDAY, April 27 
Ladies Night at University Club. 
Rehab Show, Auditorium, 8:15. 
SATURDAY, April 28 

Baseball, Penn State vs. Gettysburg; 
lacrosse, Penn Sttate vs. Brooklyn 
Polytech. See posters for time of 
events. 

Rehab Show, Auditorium 8:15. 

Club Night at University Club. 

SUNDAY, April 29 

Chapel Speaker — The Reverend Dr. 
J. K. McClurkin, of the Shadyside 
United Presbyterian iChurch, Pitts- 
burgh. 

PLEASE REPORT ERRORS 

In connection with the new general 
catalog which has just arrived, all 
deans and heads of departments are re- 
quested to kindly make note of any 
errors of omission or commission that 
they may discover and report them, 
preferably in writing, to the Bulletin 
Editor, 175 Old Main. There are some 
mistakes in this year's publication 
without doubt, and the afore-mentioned 
request is made in order to prevent rep- 
etition of them next year. 



UNIVERSITY CLUB 

Ladies Night will be celebrated at the 
University Club on Friday of this week. 
The party will be informal, with din- 
ner, dancing and cards. Music will be 
Lurnished by Griffith's Orchestra. Pa- 
tronesses will be: Mrs. E. M. Frear, 
Mrs. H. H. Havner nd Mrs. C. A. Bon- 
ine. Reservations for dinner must be 
made with Mr. Clayton not later than 
Wednesday. 

Saturday night will be Club Night. 



FACULTY MEMBER HONORED 

Professor D. L. Van Dine of the Ag- 
ricultural 'Extension staff has been 
appointed one of the scientific trustees 
of the Tropical Plant Research Cor- 
poration, a newly formed organization. 
The objects of this corporation are to 
promote research for the advance- 
ment of knowledge of the plants and 
crops of the tropics. It is planned to 
develop an institution which will con- 
duct investigations of broad interest 
in tropical regions along the lines of 
plant pathology, entomology, plant 
breeding, botany, forestry horticulture 
and agronomy. 



Dean Sackett addressed a meeting' 
of the Virginia Section of the Ameri- 
can Society of Mechanical Engineers 
held at the University of Virginia 
during the holidays. His subject was 
"New Opportunities for the Engineer." 



W . n . CROCKETT, 

3 13 K A I N BLDG. 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 2 



State College, Pa., May 1, 1923 



NUMBER 30 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 
Sophomores 
Holtzinger, Thomas S., CP 
Smith, Charles S., ME 

Freshmen 
Firing, Herbert L., CE 
Guerriero, Ernest, ME 

Two-Year Ag. 
Lehman, Edwin A., 1st year. 

o 

HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS 

With the approach of Commencement 
many iSeniors are no doubt securing 
positions in their various professions. 
Heads of departments who have def- 
inite information concerning positions 
accepted by their forthcoming gradu- 
ates are requested to send the infor- 
mation to the Department of Public 
Information for publicity purposes. The 
data should include the student's name, 
course, home town with street address, 
and location of position. 

UNIVERSITY PROFESSORS 

The State College branch of the Am- 
erican Association of University Pro- 
fessors will meet at the University 
Club on Friday evening of this week 
at 7:30. The topic for discussion will 
be "The Place of a Teacher in Modern 
Education." Refreshments will be 
served after the meeting at a cost of 
35 cents. Reservations should be made 
through the secretary, J. Ben Hill, at 
| the Botany Building. No other notice 
of this meeting will be given and all 
members are urged to be present. 



FIRST RADIO PROGRAM 

The first college attempt at radio 
broadcasting was successful and reports 
have been received from as far away 
as Wilmington, Delaware, stating that 
the sending was strong and clear. Ex- 
periments are being continued to im- 
prove the broadcasting and it is not 
known definitely just when the next 
program will be given. 



ENGINEERING HISTORY 

At the request of the Bureau of Ed- 
ucation at Washington, Dean Sackett 
is preparing a history of the Engineer- 
ing Experiment Stations in the Land 
Grant Colleges and pointing out the 
important investigations which they 
pave been carrying out. The Bureau 
)f Education is about to issue a his- 
•ory of the Land Grant Colleges, for 
vhich the section on Hydraulic Engin- 
'ering was completed some time ago. 



FRESHMEN STATE THEIR 

RELIGIOUS PREFERENCES 

Compilation has just been completed 
by the Registrar's Office showing the 
religious preferences of members of 
this year's E'reshman class at Penn 
State. Presbyterians stand first with 
272, while Methodists rank second with 
205. Universalist, Unitarian and Breth- 
ei'ii stand at the bottom of the list 
with one member each. Roman Cath- 
olics with 105 stand in third pace, while 
a total of 61 Freshmen gave no relig- 
ious preference. The complete list fol- 
lows: 

Presbyterian 272 

Methodist 203 

Roman Catholic 105 

Lutheran 101 

Protestant Episcopal 02 

Reformed til 

Baptist 4-1 

Hebrew 33 

Evangelical IS 

United Brethern 13 

Disciple 10 

Society of Friends 9 

Congregational 6 

Moravian 5 

Christian Science 4 

Church of Christ 3 

Church of God 2 

Mennonite 2 

Brethern 1 

Unitarian 1 

Universalist 1 

No preference 61 



CALENDAR 



Total 



1019 



o 



ART EXHIBIT 

An exhibition of water color, tem- 
pera, and pen and ink drawings, by 
Miss Euphame Mallison, will be on dis- 
play in the Art Rooms of Old Main 
from May 1 to May 15. Miss Mallison 
is an artist of considerable reputation 
and has attained success in several 
mediums of art expression. 



-o — 



RETURNS FROM WASHINGTON 

Dr. E. B. Forbes, director of the In- 
stitute of Animal Nutrition was called 
to ^Washington last week to attend a 
meeting of a special committee appoint- 
ed to consult with the Secretary of 
Agriculture relative to the choice of a 
Chief Chemist for the U. IS. Bureau of 
Chemistry, and concerning a program 
of research for the Bureau, on chemis- 
try as related to agriculture. 



Professors C. L. Kinsloe and E. C. 
Woodruff of the Department of Elect- 
rical Engineering, were in Pittsburgh 
last week in the interests of the new 
radio broadcasting station. 



FRIDAY, May 4 

Meeting of A. A. U. P., University 
Club, 7:30. 

Fathers' Day mass meeting, Auditor- 
ium 

SATURDAY, May 5 

Fathers' Day. Athletic events — Per. i 
State vs. Syracuse, baseball; Carne- 
gie Tech track; Bucknell, tennis; Wash- 
ington and Jefferson, golf; State Fresh- 
men vs. Kiski, baseball. See posters for 
time of events. 

Club Night at University Club. 

SUNDAY, May G 

Chapel Speaker — Dr. Edwin C. 
Broome, Superintendent of Schools, 
Philadelphia. 

FATHERS' DAY 

Saturday of this week has been set 
aside as Fathers' Day at Penn State 
and a most busy program has been ar- 
ranged tor the visiting "Dads" by the 
student committee in charge. Last 
year there were more than 700 fathers 
on hand for the occasion and it is ex- 
pected that the attendance this week- 
end will be even greater. 

The program that has been outlined 
calls for a mass meeting in the Audi- 
torium on Friday evening. The an- 
nual meeting of the Parents of Penn 
State Association, or the "Pops," will 
take place iSaturday morning, while 
Saturday afternoon will be given up to 
an athletic program that includes five 
or six events. Varsity baseball with 
Syracuse, track with Carnegie Tech, 
tennis with Bucknell and golf with W. 
and J. will be the main attractions, 
while a Freshman baseball g.|me will 
be played with Kiski. * 

Saturday night will be given over to 
fraternity smokers and a big Penn 
State Club smoker in the Armory. The 
chapel services on Sunday will be ad- 
dressed by Dr. Edwin C. Broome, Sup- 
erintendent of (Schools, of Philadelphia. 
A concert by the military band is 
scheduled for Sunday afternoon. 



Dean Sackett spoke at the annual 
convention of the Workers Educational 
Bureau of America in New York re- 
cently, and he will address the annual 
convention of one of the national col- 
legiate engineering organizations at 
Purdue University on Saturday of this 
week. 



Saturday night will be Club Night at 
the University Club and the usual 
smoker will be held. 






• w .v „ ^ r v w , 4 t 
3 13 K A I N BLPG 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 



VOLUME 2 



State College, Pa., May 8, 1923 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



NUMBER 31 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

TO THE FACULTY: 

In View of the approach of the final 
examinations, I wish to make two re- 
quests of the instructional staff. 

Since we are committed, temporarily 
a I least, to the proctor system in ex- 
aminations, I wish all those in charge 
af examinations would take careful, but 
honorable precautions to keep cheating 
:o a minimum. Much can be done, I 
believe, in lessening the temptation to 
dishonesty by making it difficult to 
cheat. In my talks with students I 
have been impressed with the fact that 
they respect most those instructors 
who use all honorable means for en- 
forcing honesty in the examination 
rooms. 

I desire also to have readily avail- 
able as much information as possible 
about students who fail, particularly 
those who fall under the fifty percent 
rule. I receive many letters from par- 
ents and friends of such students in- 
quiring as to the reasons for the fail- 
ures, and I desire to reply to these in- 
quiries with as much specific and perti- 
nent information as possible. It will 
pe of great help if all deans and advis- 
ers can have on hand the kind of in- 
formation that a parent may properly 
isk for in the case of a son or daughter 
who has not come up to parental hopes 
lind expectations. 

JOHN M. THOMAS 



LIBERAL ARTS FACULTY 

The regular meeting of the Liberal 
A.rts Faculty will be held on Wednes- 
day, May 9, at 4:30 in room 25 of the 
Liberal Arts Building. — L. V. T. Sim- 
nons, secretary. 

o 

STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

Senior 

Doyle, Harry C, Jr., BE 

Junior 
Nurick, Julius, CF 

Freshmen 
Bernet, Maurice J., LA 
Zimmerling Harold I., PM 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

In order to facilitate college admin- 
stration and operation, to adequately 
neet contacts with students and the 
general public, arid to equalize con- 
litions of service of office employees, 
he following uniform practice with 
eference to office hours, holidays and 
vacations will become effective in all 
lepartments of the college June 1, 
923. 

Hours of service in all general ad- 
ministration, school and department 
'ffices shall be 8:00 to 12:00 a. m. and 



1:30 to 5:00 p. m. daily, with a half 
holiday on Saturday afternoon. From 
June 15 to September 1, the afternoon 
shall be from 1:00 to 4:30 p. m. 

Holidays. Daily office hours as indi- 
cated above shall be maintained ex- 
cept on the following special holidays: 
New Year's Day, Memorial Day, 
Fourth of July, Labor Day, Thanks- 
giving Day and Christmas. 

Vacation with pay will be allowed on 
the basis of two calendar weeks or 
twelve working days for each six 
months of service rendered by mem- 
bers of the office forces. Vacation al- 
lowances may be taken at such times 
as may be approved by department 
heads and so as to make it unneces- 
sary to employ substitute assistance. 

Overtime in excess of four hours per 
week may be off-set by additional va- 
cation allowance. 

Office employees whose full time • is 
not needed at certain seasons in their 
regular positions may be transferred 
for part time service to other office". 
Officers of administration shouM re- 
port such possibilities of economy in 
office labor to the Comptroller's Of- 
fice. 

R. H. SMITH 
Comptroller. 
Authorized: 

John M. Thomas, 
President. 

DON QUIXOTE TONIGHT 

Under the auspices of the Penn 
State Players, the Tony Sarg Marion- 
ettes will appear in the Auditorium to- 
night in; a production of "Don Quix- 
ote" from the novel by Cervantes. 
This is a new style offering for Penn 
State in the dramatic line but the 
Players are confident of its success. 

Tony Sarg is practically without ri- 
val in the realm of marionette produc- 
tions on account of the uncanny, life- 
like acting of his puppets, their won- 
derful mechanical perfection, and the 
stage setting and properties which are 
all unusually novel and attractive. 

Tickets for the performance are 50c, 
75c, and $1.00 and will be on sale at 
the box office tonight. 



CALENDAR 



INTERSCHOLASTIC DAY 

Next Saturday will be Interscholastic 
Bay at Penn State and will be featured 
by the fourteenth annual track and 
field meet under the auspices of the 
college athletic authorities. More than 
300 schoolboy athletes have been en- 
tered from 30 leading schools and with 
favorable weather and a fast track 
some interscholastic records should 
fall. 

The preliminaries will be run off in 
the morning, starting about ten o'clock. 
The finals will start at 1:30 in the 
afternoon. 



TUESDAY, May 8 

Tony Sarg Marionettes, Auditorium, 
8:15. 

WEDNESDAY, May 9 
Liberal Arts Faculty Meeting, 4:30, 
Room 25, L. A. 

Spanish Club, Old Chapel, 7:30. 
FRIDAY, May 11 

Penn State Players at the University 
Club, S.00. 

SATURDAY, May 12 

Interscholastic Track meet, pre- 
liminaries in the morning, finals at 
1:30. 

Club Night at University Club. 

SUNDAY, May 13 

Mothers' Day. Chapel Speaker — The 
Right Reverend Dr. James H. Darling- 
ton, of Harrisburg. 

THURSDAY, May 17 

College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Aud- 
itorium. 

SILVER BAY 

Members of the Faculty who are 
interested in modern religious and 
social problems are invited to join the 
Penn State delegation to the Y. M. C. 
A. Summer Conference at Silver Bay 
on Lake George, New York. The time 
this year is ideal — June 14 to 22 — fall- 
ing between Commencement and the 
opening of Summer Session. Expenses 
are low and the opportunity for rest 
and recreation is unlimited in the 
beautiful Adirondack region. Those in- 
terested are asked to communicate 
with Mr. Olmstead at the Y. M. C. A. 
office. 



SPANISH CLUB 

A vocal and musical program will be 
given by the Circulo de los Amigos de 
la Lengua Espanola tomorrow (Wed- 
nesday) evening at 7:30 in the Old 
Chapel. A cordial invitation, to be 
present is extended to all members of 
the faculty. 



UNIVERSITY CLUB 

The Penn State Players will give a 
program at the University Club on 
Friday night of this week and all club 
members, wives and partners are in- 
vited to attend. Saturday night v/ill bo 
Club Night. 



MOTHERS' DAY 

Next Sunday will be nationally ob- 
served as Mothers' Day when the white 
carnation will be the universal flower. 



W . P. CROCKETT , 
313 MAIN BLDG. 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
aouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the faoul- 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 2 



State College, Pa., May 15, 1923 



NUMBER 32 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



COLLEGE SENATE 

The regular meeting' of the College 
Senate will take place on Thursday 
evening of this week at 7:30 in the 
Foyer of the Auditorium. 



AGRICULTURAL FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the Ag- 
ricultural Faculty at 4:30 on Thursday 
of this week in Room 103 Ag. Build- 
ing.— R. L. Watts. 



NATURAL SCIENCE FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the Fa- 
culty of the School of Natural Science 
on Wednesday, May 16, at 4:30 p m., 
in the Physics Lecture Room. — B. H. 
Dusham, secretary. 

o 

ANNUAL MILITARY REVIEW 

The Council of Administration has 
designated Friday afternoon, May 25, 
as the time for the annual review of 
the R. O. T. iC. regiment and the inci- 
dental features of that occasion. All 
other college exercises will be suspend- 
ed for the afternoon. 



SENIOR GRADES 

The graduating class this year is un- 
usually large, numbering about 560 Sen- 
iors. Consequently, instructors who 
teach Seniors are earnestly requested 
to report Senior grades to the Registrar 
at the earliest possible moment. To 
avoid mistakes, the revised Senior list 
in the new college catalogue, just is- 
sued, should be consulted. Grades of 
Seniors should be placed on a separate 
sheet and should be plainly marked 
"Senior grades." 

Seniors who pursue studies in classes 
consisting mainly of Juniors, Sopho- 
mores or Freshmen should, if necessary, 
be given a special examination in order 
that their grades may be placed in the 
Registrar's hands not later than 4:30 
p. m., Wednesday, June 6.— W. S. Hoff- 
man, Acting Registrar. 



VACATION WORK FOR 

THE COLLEGE CAMPAIGN 

Without serious personal sacrifice, 
members of the Faculty can assist the 
Campaign this summer in the three 
following respects: 

1. A good many more pledges can be 
secured by the personal solicitation of 
alumni and former students. Many 
Penn State men live outside of Penn- 
sylvania, and it has not yet been pos- 
sible for any one to see these men per- 
sonally. Some members of the Faculty 
will take automobile trips this summer 
uid will be passing through towns and 



cities where there are several Penn 
State men. Why not stop a few min- 
utes along the way and get these al- 
umni subscriptions? The Headquar- 
ters office will gladly supply you with 
the names and addresses of former 
Penn State students living in the cities, 
towns, and regions that you will pass 
through. 

2. If you are a Pennsylvanian and 
are planning to return to your home 
town or county during the summer, 
Campaign Headquarters will be pleased 
to furnish you with a memorandum of 
alumni and ex-students who have not 
yet subscribed from that district. Thus 
you can help to make our canvass com- 
plete and to increase the percentage of 
alumni participation. 

3. Again, if you are a Pennsylvanian, 
spending part of your vacation in your 
.ormer home, consider the possibility 
of your securing campaign contributions 
.rom certain old friends and acquaint- 
ances, who are weil-disposed towards 
the college, and to whom you have 
friendly and convenient access. In 
many cases you can obtain such sub- 
scriptions far better than any one else. 
In scores of cases experience has shown 
that the trick can be turned without 
trouble .or unpleasantness. Headquar- 
ters will be glad to inform you wheth- 
er a given person or group of persons 
have made campaign contributions. 

The pressure of regular college duties 
has prevented many members of the 
Faculty from taking part in the Cam- 
paign work during the college year. 
Tiie corning vacation will give these 
men an opportunity to do their bit. The 
money is there, if you will only help us 
to get it. — A. H. Espenshade, vice-direct- 
or of the Campaign. 

RADIO PROGRAM 

Faculty members who are radio fans 
or who have access ito radio sets may 
listen in on the broadcasting program 
that will be sent from the college sta- 
tion W P A B, 360 metres tonight 
(Tuesday). The program will start at 
eight o'clock and will include "The 
Purpose of Music Week," by Professor 
Grant; "Nittany Lion" and "Old Man 
Noah" by the Men's Glee Club; "Annie 
Laurie" and other selections by the 
Varsity Quartet; "Gypsy Airs," Sarasate 
violin solo by A. R. Fink '26; "De Cop- 
pa Moon", Shelley, and "Alphabet" 
Mozart, by the Girl's Glee Club; 
"Chorus of Revellers", Gounod, and 
"Mighty Lak' a Rose", Neyia, by the 
Girl's Quartet; "If Winter Comes" 
tenor solo by C. E. Finley, '24; "Can't 
Yo Hear Me Calling" and "Lucky Jim," 
arranged, by the Varsity Quartet; 
"Homing," "My Lindy Lou," Strickland 
and "Ah, Sweet Mysteries of Life," 
Herbert, soprano solos by Miss Betty 
Croll, '25; and college songs by the 
combined girl's and men's Glee Clubs. 



CALENDAR 



TUESDAY, May 15 

Radio Broadcasting Program from 
the college station, W P A B, at 8:00 
p. m. 

WEDNESDAY, May 16 

Natural Science Faculty meeting, 
Physics Lecture Room, 4:30. 
THURSDAY, May 17 

Ag. Faculty meeting, 4:30, Room 
103 Ag. 

College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Audi- 
torium. 

FRIDAY, May 18 
Baseball, 4:00, Penn State vs. Beth- 
any. 

SATURDAY, May 19 
Baseball, Penn iState vs. Bethany; 
Penn State Freshmen vs. Pitt Fresh- 
men. Lacrosse, Penn State vs. Swarth- 
iviore. See posters for time of events. 
Club Night at University Club 

SUNDAY, May 20 
No Chapel Speaker. A musical pro- 
gram will be given at both services. 

MEETING OF THE A. A. A. S, 

The 'State College Branch of the 
American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science will hold a dinner 
meeting on Thursday evening, May 24, 
at 6:30 at the University Club. It will 
be for members, wives and friends, and 
the dinner will cost 70 cents per plate. 
Reservations for the dinner must he 
made by May 21. 

Following the dinner Dr. Herman L. 
Fairchild, Professor of Geology at the 
University of Rochester, will speak on 
the subject "Glacial History of the Sus- 
quehanna Valley." Dr. Fairchild is a 
Pennsylvanian and is an authority on 
glacial geology. For the past three 
years he has been making a special 
study of glaciation in the Susquehanna 
Valley for the 'State Geologist of Penn- 
sylvania. Members unable to be pres- 
ent for the dinner will be welcome to 
the lecture following at about 7:30. 



FACULTY VOLUNTEERS 

The Department of Public Informa- 
tion has procured a number of road 
signs which indicate the way to State 
College and it is planned to place them 
at definite points on the main highways 
within a 75 mile radius of the college. 
Faculty members with cars who are 
planning either pleasure or business 
trips in any direction between now and 
Commencement are asked to volunteer 
in placing these signs at the stated lo- 
cations. It will be appreciated if they 
will advise G. W. Sullivan, of the De- 
partment of Public Information of any 
contemplated trips and of their will- 
ingness to help out in this matter. 



W.P. CROCKETT. 
3 13 MAIN B L P G . 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of Interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 2 



State College, Pa., May 22, 1923 



NUMBER 33 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

NO CLASSES 

By action of the Council of Admin- 
istration, Friday afternoon of this week 
has been set aside for the annual re- 
view of the R. O. T. C. regiment and 
the incidental features of that occa- 
sion. All other college exercises will 
be suspended for the afternoon. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 
Sophomore 
Dick, Clarence H., ME 
Freshman 
Baggs, William E., Hrt 



PERSONNEL RECORDS 

Members of the academic staff are 
asked to kindly return the personnel 
record blanks sent to them last week 
to the President's Office not later than 
Saturday of this week. The informa- 
tion requested is needed to bring the 
college records up to date. It should 
be noted that on the reverse side of 
the record blank a request is made for 
the following data: Membership in 
professional and scientific organiza- 
tions; books and professional papers 
published; and research projects con- 
ducted. 



CAMPAIGN BENEFIT 

Through the generous offer of Maur- 
ice Baum, next Monday and Tuesday, 
May 28 and 29, have been set as Cam- 
paign benefit days at the local "mov- 
ies". Every ticket sold for those nights 
and for Tuesday's matinee will boost 
the building fund. The picture will be 
"Within The Law", with Norma Tal- 
madge as the star. It will be worth 
seeing aside from the help that will 
be given the Campaign. 



Grades of seniors 

The attention of faculty members is 
again called to the matter of Senior 
grades. These should be placed in the 
hands of the Registrar not later than 
4:30 p. m. on Wednesday, June 6, and 
should be reported as promptly as pos- 
sible after the examination is complet- 
ed. Grades of Seniors should be placed 
on a separate sheet and plainly marked 
"Senior Grades." 

DOMESTIC ART EXHIBIT 

The Department of Home Economics 
will hold an exhibit of the work done 
in the Domestic Art classes on Thurs- 
day evening of this week at 7:30 in 
Room 14, Women's Building. 



REGULAR RADIO PROGRAMS 

Starting last night, regular radio pro- 
grams will be sent from the college 
broadcasting station three nights a 
week until the close of the present 
term. The programs will be given on 
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays 
and will start promptly at 8:00 o'clock. 
Every Monday night will be "Farm 
and Garden Night" when talks will be 
given by members of the agricultural 
staff. President Thomas gave the 
opening address at last night's broad- 
casting. 

The programs for the next week are 
as follows: Station WPAB, State Col- 
lege — 

Wednesday, May 23. — Music by stu- 
dent orchestra; "The Penn State Min- 
ing School" by Dean Holbrook. 

Friday, May 25. — Music by student 
mandolin quartet; reports from En- 
gineering and Conservation meetings 
held here that day; and at 9:00 p. m., 
the "Penn State Players" in a theatri- 
cal entertainment. 

Monday, May 28. — Music by student 
orchestra; "Agricultural Extension", 
by Director M. S. McDowell. 



CALENDAR 



A. A. A. S. MEETING 

A dinner meeting of the local 
branch of the American Association 
for the Advancement of Science will 
be held at the University Club on 
Thursday evening of this week at 
6:30. Members may bring their wives 
and friends to this meeting. The din- 
ner will cost 70 cents per plate. Fol- 
lowing the dinner there will be a lec- 
ture on "Glacial History of the Sus- 
quehanna Valley" by Dr. Herman L. 
Fairchild, Professor of Geology at the 
University of Rochester. Members 
unable to attend the dinner are wel- 
come for the lecture following at about 
7:30. Dinner reservations can be made 
no later than this morning, through 
R. D. Anthony, Hort Building, or J. 
Ben Hill, Botany Building. 



EXHIBIT 



There will be an exhibition of the 
work of the Freshman girls in Ap- 
plied Design on Wednesday and 
Thursday of this week in 284 Old Main. 
Examples of work in Batik, block- 
printing, and parchment will be 
shown. 



Professor Jabir Shibli, of the Mathe- 
matics Department, has recently giv- 
en a number of addresses in nearby 
communities. He made Commencement 
addresses at the Beavertown and 
Milesburg High 'Schools and also ad- 
dressed a young people's gathering at 
Burnham. Last Sunday he spoke at 
Fairfield. 



THURSDAY, May 24 

A. A. A. S. Dinner Meeting at the 
University Club, 6:30. 

FRIDAY, May 25 

All classes suspended in afternoon 
for annual military review. 

Engineering and Conservation gath- 
erings at the college. 

Ladies Night at the University Club. 

SATURDAY, May 26 

No athletic events. 
Return Personnel Record blanks to 
President's Office. 

SUNDAY, May 27 
Chapel Speaker — Miss Margaret 
Slattery, writer and lecturer, of Maid- 
en, Massachusetts. 

WEDNESDAY, May 30 
Memorial Day holiday. 



ROAD SIGNS 

Several members of the Faculty have 
volunteered to put up State College 
road signs while on business trips but 
a great many signs remain to be post- 
ed. It will be appreciated if other 
faculty members will offer to take a 
few minutes time on any of their trips 
to aid in this distribution. Volunteers 
should communicate with G. W. Sul- 
livan, at the Department of Public In- 
formation. 



UNIVERSITY CLUB 

The final Ladies Night of the year 
will take place at the University Club 
on Friday evening of this week. The 
patronesses will be Mrs. A. S. Hurreil, 
Mrs. W. R. Ham, and Mrs. H, B. 
Shattuck. The party will be informal, 
with dinner, dancing, and cards. Res- 
ervations for dinner must be made 
with Mr. Clayton not later than to- 
morrow (Wednesday). 



GOOD ROADS EXHIBIT 

The Highway Education Board has 
sent to the college for exhibition a 
number of models of various types of 
highways, bridges, and culverts, which 
have been placed on exhibition in 
Room 102 Engineering A, where they 
may be seen by those interested daily 
between the hours of 8:00 a. m. and 
5:00 p. m. 

o 

Y. M. C. A. PLEDGES 

Members of the faculty who promis- 
ed financial support to the Y. M. C. A. 
during the December campaign will 
confer a favor on the Association if 
they will advise Mr. Hilier, the busi- 
ness secretary, at the Hat, as to when 
their contribution may bo expected. 



W. D. CROCKETT , 
3 13 WAIN BLDG 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 2 



State College, Pa., May 29, 1923 



NUMBER 34 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

COLLEGE SENATE 

The final meeting of the year for the 
College Senate will be held on Thurs- 
day evening, June 7, at 7:30, in the 
Foyer of the Auditorium. 

o 

GRADE REPORTS 
The Registrar desires to call the at- 
tention of all faculty members to the 
following college regulation: 

"Grade reports must be turned in 
within two weeks after the date of the 
examination," both to this office and 
to the office of the dean.— W. S. Hoff- 
man, Acting Registrar. 

o ■ 



SENATE ACTION 

The following action was taken by 
the College Senate at its May meeting: 

1. On the recommendation of the 
School of Engineering, the Senate voted 
that hereafter attendance at the en- 
gineering lectures be scheduled in the 
Senior year of engineering curricula and 
that they be given a nominal credit of 
one for each semester. The Senate 
also voted that this credit and credit 
for Inspection Trip be not included in 
the maximum of eighteen credit houis 
fixed by recent Senate action. 

2. It was voted that "if a student 
withdraws from college during the last ' 
three weeks of a semester, the Faculty 
of his School may apply the so-called 
fifty percent rule to his case, if at the 
time of his withdrawal he is found to 
be below the passing grade in fifty per 
cent or more of his scheduled credit 
hours." 

3. The Senate adopted a recommenda- 
tion of the Committee on Student Welfare 
suggesting a joint meeting of the Com- 
mittees on Publications, Athletics, Aca- 
demic Standards, and Student Welfare 
to consider the matter of a point system 
in activities for men students and to 
make recommendations to the Senate. 

CAMPAIGN MOVIES 

This aifternioon's matinee and to- 

| night's performance at the Pastime 

J Theatre will be for the benefit of the 

Campaign through the generosity of Mr. 

Maurice Baum. Faculty members who 

desire to see one of the best pictures 

of the year and at the same time boost 

the building fund, should be sure to 

see Norma Talmadge in "Within The 

Law" today. 

o 

CAPS AND GOWNS 
Members of the faculty and candi- 
dates for advanced degrees who will 
need gowns for the Commencement ex- 
ercises can order the same from Mr. 
P. W. Vedder, at the University Club. 
To avoid delay, they should be ordered 
as soon as possible. 



RADIO PROGRAMS 

The following programs will be given 
at the college radio broadcasting sta- 
tion during the next week: Station 
WPAB, 360 meters: 

Wednesday, May 30 — 8:00 p. m. — Mu- 
sic by student male quartet; "Memorial 
Day" by Dr. Sparks; piano selections 
by E. E. Welles, '23; "The Penn State 
School of Engineering," by Dean Sack- 
ett; tenor solo by D. V. Bauder, '24; 
and selections by the quartet. 

Friday, June 1 — 8:00 p. m. — Music by 
string trio and piano; "Penn State 
■Student Health and Welfare" by Presi- 
dent Thomas; vocal solo by Miss Doro- 
thy Brandon '25 followed by string trio ; 
"The Penn State Schools of Liberal Arts 
and Natural Science" by Dean Stod- 
dart; tenor solo by W. J. O'Donnell '23, 
followed by string trio. 

Monday, Jim© 4 — 8:00 p. m. — Music 
by a student orchestra; "Alumni Re- 
union Day at Penn State" by Alumni 
Secretary Sullivan; baritone solo by 
P. W. Moor'23 ; Farm and Garden items : 
soprano solo by Mrs. A. C. Cloetingh; 
orchestra selections. 



TO HONOR DR. PATTEE 

Dartmouth College, the Alma Mater 
of Dr. Fred Lewis Pattee, head of the 
English Department at Penn State, 
will confer an additional honor on him 
at the Commencement exercises this 
year. He is to be awarded the degree 
of Doctor of Letters. Professor Pattee 
was graduated from Dartmouth in 1888. 
and since 1894 he has been professor of 
American Literature at this institution. 
An additional and well-deserved honor 
that has just come to Professor Pattee 
lies in the action of the Class of 1924 in 
dedicating the present issue of the 
LaVie to him. 

o 

SEATS FOR COMMENCEMENT 

Members of the faculty who wish to 
attend the Commencement exercises on 
the morning of June 12 will march in 
the procession and occupy seats on the 
stage. All seats in the body of the 
Auditorium have been reserved for par- 
ents and alumni. Admission will be 
by ticket until 9:30 a. m., and after 
that hour any seats remaining vacant 
may be occupied by the general public. 



UNIVERSITY CLUB 
The basket picnic scheduled for mem- 
bers of the University Club, their wives, 
families and partners, for tomorrow, 
Memorial Day, has been called off, due 
to the fact that so many members are 
out of town doing Campaign work this 
week. The Social Committee is making 
tentative plas for the holding of the pic- 
nic some time after the reopening of 
college in the fall. No social events 
are planned for the Club this week. 



CALENDAR 

WEDNESDAY, May 30 
Memorial Day holiday. Parade and 
patriotic meeting in morning, tennis 
match with Carnegie Tech in after- 
noon. 

FRIDAY, June 1 
Tennis, Penn State vs. Michigan Ag- 
gies. 

SATURDAY, June 2 
Baseball, Penn State vs. Waynes- 
burg, 2:30. 

SUNDAY, June 3. 
No Chapel. 

MEMORIAL DAY 

Tomorrow will be Memorial Day, 
which is listed in the college calendar 
as a holiday, and all college exercises 
will be suspended for the day. A par- 
ade through the town smarting at ten 
o'clock in the morning will be followed 
by Memorial Day exerciser on the front 
campus. The parade will form on 
Beaver Avenue a:d move west to Bur- 
rowes street, then e to College Avenue 
and east to Pugh Street. Turning up 
Pugh Street, the parade will follow the 
driveway past the Auditorium, stop- 
ping at the grave of former President 
Atherton for memorial services and a 
military salute. 

The program on the front campus 
will consist of the invocation by the 
Rev. A. E. Mackie; singing of "Amer- 
ica" by the school children; introduct- 
ory remarks by President Thomas, fol- 
lowed by an address by the Honorable 
William I. Betts, State Senator from 
this district; benediction by the Rev. 
E. H. Romig; and the ceremony of 
raising of the flag. 



SALE OF TICKETS 
Faculty members who wish tickets for 
the Commencement performance of the 
Penn State Players, "Mr. Pim Passes 
By," on June 8, are urged to order them 
at once from Director A. C. Cloetingh. 
Due to the large Commencement crowds 
the sale has been unusually large and 
already a big part of the house is sold. 
The play promises to be in keeping with 
the high standard that the Players have 
set in their previous productions. 



DEAN HOLBROOK WORKING 

ON MINE SAFETY REPORT 
Dean Holbrook of the School of 
Mines has been retained by the U. S. 
Coal Commission to take charge of 
the preparation of a general report 
on coal mine safety in the United 
States. It is expected that a staff of 
specialists in the various branches of 
mine safety work will assist and that 
the final report will be completed by 
the latter part of July. 



' . n . c n o c v r t t 
1 3 ^:ain el no. 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 2 



State College, Pa., June 5, 1923 



NUMBER 35 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



LAST FACULTY BULLETIN 

This will be the last issue of the Fac- 
ulty Bulletin iior the present college 
year. Publication will be resumed on 
or about next September 18. 



FINAL SENATE MEETING 

The final meeting of the College Sen- 
ate will take place on Thursday even- 
ing' of this week at 7 :b0 in the Foyer of 
the Auditorium. 



GRADUATE FACULTY 

The regular meeting of the Graduate 
Faculty will be held this afternoon 
^Tuesday,) at 4:30 in Old Chapel. — F. 
D. Kern, dean. 



GRADE REPORTS 



Senior grades should be in the hands 
of the Registrar by tomorrow (Wednes- 
day) afternoon at 4:30 and Senior fail- 
ures should be reported at once by tele- 
phone to the Registrar and the stu- 
dent's Dean. Grades of other students 
should not be delayed later than June 
15, which is one week after the last 
final examination. — W. S. Hoffman, 
Acting Registrar. 



GRADUATE ASSISTANTS 

At the January meeting of the Board 
of Trustees there was established in the 
collegiate staff a rank to be known as 
Graduate Assistant, with a standard 
compensation in the various schools 
and departments, with approximately 
enual requirements as to service to the 
college and with the same privileges 
for graduate study. The stipend for 
next year is $Suu. iMot more than two- 
thirds oi a full schedule may be carried 
or not rMiore than two-tiurds Ox a iU.i 
year's graduate work may be completed 
in any one ye jr. oervice required oy 
the college is oi e-han tne duties of full 
time assistants )r instructors in the de- 
partment in Ai lcn employed. 

Department .leads considering un; 
possibility or employment ot assistants 
on this basis may secure application 
blanks, which will be sent to candidates, 
from the office of the Dean of the 
Graduate School. On these oiainis i~ 
printed a statement of terms of em- 
ployment as outlined in the action of 
the Board of Trustees. 

FACULTY WELCOME 

Faculty members are cordially invit- 
ed to participate in the enjoyment of 
the big Alumni Day Carnival on Satur- 
day. This will oe neid on the Armory 
field and promises to be the greatest 
affair of its kind in Penn State history. 



ORDER OF PROCESSIONS 

FOR COMMENCEMENT WEEK 

At the public college exercises on 
Sunday and Tuesday mornings, the 
faculty will be seated upon the platform, 
all other seats being reserved for par- 
ents and alumni. Academic costume 
will be worn. Caps will be removed 
at the invocation and resumed at the 
recession. 

On both Baccalaureate Sunday and 
Commencement Day, faculty members 
will assemble in the Carnegie Library. 
On Sunday they should assemble no lat- 
er than 10:15 a. m., and on Tuesday at 
9:15 a. m. All candidates for advanced 
degrees are asked to gather in the 
Reading Room to' the right of the en- 
trance. 

The procession will move from the li- 
brary in single column, double file; on 
entering lobby of the Auditorium by 
middle door, the chief marshall will 
divide the procession into two columns, 
double file, alternate pairs right and 
left, to move down each aisle simul- 
taneously. Seats will be taken on the 
stage in order of the procession, begin- 
ning with the first full row. Only the 
chairs for the chaplain, clergyman and 
official guests will be placarded in the 
front row. Recession will take place in 
the same order following the graduating 
class. 

In case of inclement weather on either 
day, the assembling will take place in 
the Foyer of the Auditorium as above 
outlined. 



HELP WANTED 



Members of the faculty who are Penn 
State graduates are asked to volunteer 
their services in completing arrange- 
ments for the Alumni Day Carnival to 
be held next Saturday. All who can 
give a few hours of their time this week 
should communicate with Earl Stavely, 
chairman of the carnival committee, in 
Engineering D. 



ROAD SIGNS 

„p, but additional faculty volun- 
teers ars wanted to distribute the rest. 
It will be appreciated if faculty mem - 
u r ■■ will inform the Bui e:in .d.tor 
Mr. G. W. Sullivan, of any contemplated 
trips and of their willingness to help 
in this matter. 



TO TOUR EUROPE 

During the summer vacation Mr. 
Jabir Shibli and Mr. P. S. Dwyer, of 
the Mathematics department, will trav- 
el in foreign lands. Mr. Shibli will go 
as far East as Mount Lebanon, while 
Mr. Dwyer will spend most of his time 
in Italy and France. 



CALENDAR 



TUESDAY, June 5 

Graduate Faculty meeting, 4:30, Old 
Chapel. 

THURSDAY, Jutie 7 

College Senate, 7 : 30, Foyer of Audi- 
torium. 

FRIDAY, June 8 

Baseball, Penn State vs. University of 
Washington, c:3U. 
Alumni Dinner, McAllister Hall, 7:00. 
Penn State Players, 7:30, Auditorium. 
Dance at University Club. 
SATURDAY, June 9 

Alumni Day. Baseball, tennis and 
goli, Penn State vs Pitt. 

Musical Clubs' Concert 7:30, Auditor- 
ium. 

SUNDAY, June 10 

Baccalaureate Sermon by Reverend 
W. Warren Giles, D. D., First Reformed 
Church, East Orange, N. J., at 10:30. 
1' acuity procession. 

Band Concert, Front Campus, 4:00 
p. m. 

Instrumental and vocal concert, 8:00, 
Auditorium. 

MONDAY, June 11 

Class Day. Baseball and track, Penn 
State vs. Pitt. 

Thespian Play, 7 : 30, Auditorium. 
TUESDAY, June 12 

Commencement exercises, 10:00 a. m. 
Auditorium. Faculty on platform. 



PENN STATE PLAYERS 

The Penn State Players will give their 
final performance of the regular college 
year on Friday evening at 7:30 in the 
Auditorium when they will be seen in 
'Mr. Pim Passes By." The Commence- 
ment production promises to be in keep- 
ing with the high standard of former 
Piayer performances with almost all of 
, ... in the cast. Faculty members 
. . _ . om Mi . .ii. C. Cioe- 

..^j, ,_. ii^o .je^i -..i ^iiua-aiiy 

,..jv, s-i.e ^nd a ;ur e poraon of the 
,ia It any tickets 

...^j .j.*. oc u.. ..aic at the box 

^v.e ^ei.ore the play. 



UNIVERSITY CLUB 

Visitor's night will be celebrated at 
the University Club on Friday evening 
of this week when the club will be open 
to those who care to visit and dance. 
The patronesses of the evening will be 
Mrs. R. H. Smith, Mrs. M. D. Welty 
and Mrs. J. Ben Hill. This will close 
the club social season until fall. 



W. P. CROCKETT , 

313 l ? A I N ELDQ 



Published every Tuesday 
luring the college year as a 
neans of making official an- 
louncements and presenting 
terns of interest to the facul- 

y. 



ennsylvania S 




Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



OLUME 3 



State College, Pa., September 11, 1923 



NUMBER 1 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

OPENING EXERCISES 

President Thomas is especially du- 
irous of having' all Faculty members 
ttend the opening' exercises of the 
olleg'e on Wednesday morning' at 
0:30, in the Auditorium and he par- 

ularly requests that they occupy 
uats on the platform. 



COUNCIL MEETING 

The first meeting of the Council of 
Ldministration will be held in the 
'resident's Office on Thursday, Sep- 
smlber 13, at 10:00 a. m. Council 
leetings will take place reguiarly on 
londay of each week, but because 
osterday was one of the registration 
ayg, the first meeting was advanced 
D Thursday. 



FIRST MEETING OF SENATE 

The first regular meeting' of the Col- 
»8'e Senate will be held on Thursday 
vening-, September £0, at 7 s80 in the 
''oyer of the Auditorium. According' 
o the By-Laws, the regular Senate 
aeeeting- is held the third Thursday of 
ach month from September to June. 



THE CAMPAIGN 

During July and August the Cam- 
>aign and the Campaign workers 
lave rested. In this interval a little 
nore than $20,000 has been received 
n small pledges. The fund now to- 
ds $1,330,000. 

With the opening of college, Cam- 
>aign activities will be resumed with 
enewed vigor. The knowledge that 
he money is there, that we can have 
t if we only go out after it, and that 
he college sorely needs it in its pres- 
;nt hampered program, ought to be a 
ufficiently stimulating challenge to 
)ur loyalty and perseverance. Let us 
)ut enough energy into the Campaign 
o finish it with flying colors. 

What we need most is to have more 
people thinking about the Campaign 
md actively working for it. The one 
ill-important thing essential to a fly- 
ing finish is to secure pledges or to 
tell where they can be obtained. To 
ave expense, the publication of the 
Campaign Booster" will be discon- 
tinued. The time for extensive pub- 
licity and speechmaking is past. W_hat 
s now needed in the Campaign is the 
luiet earnest, direct effort that can 
:>e translated into pledges. 

About one-half of the Alumni have 
:ontributed. It is incumbent upon us 
o get the other half. And we must 
also secure a number of big gifts. A 
Pledge from an alumnus insures his 
:ontinued loyalty; a contribution from, 
i non-alumnus increases our claim and 
lold upon public support. 

The Faculty and the undergraduates 
lave been thoroughly canvassed, and 
lave contributed most generously. It 



is only fair now that we should make 
as general a canvass of our alumni 
and friends, and that we should se- 
cure from them an equally generous 
participation. 

Can we count on your help? Will 
you come to Headquarters, and tell us 
what you are willing and able to do 
for the Campaign? 

FACULTY CHANGES 

During the summer the customary 
number of changes in the personnel 
of the Faculty have taken place. Most 
prominent among the resignations have 
been those of Miss Margaret A. 
Knight, for four years dean of women; 
Miss Pearl MacDonald, head of home 
economics extension work since its 
organization in 1914; and Professor 
W. C. Pelton, of the department oi 
Horticulture. 

Miss Charlotte E. Ray, assistant 
dean of women for the past two Sum- 
mer Sessions, who also was acting- 
dean during the absence of Miss 
Knight throughout the second semest- 
er last year, has been "appointed as 
tiie new clean of women. She is a 
graduate of the University of Pitts- 
burgh and has been a teacher in the 
Westinghouse High School and in the 
grade schools of Allegheny County. 

To fill the newly created office of 
College Chaplain, the trustees recently 
confirmed the appointment of the Rev. 
Dr. eraser Metzger, for the past six- 
teen years pastor of the Bethany Con- 
gregational Church at Randolph, Ver- 
mont. In addition to taking charge of 
the daily chapel exercises, the new 
chaplain will act as advisor to the men 
students. Dr. Metzger is a graduate 
of Union Theological Seminary and 
for almost twenty years has been a 
leader in the religious, civic, political 
and welfare life of Vermont. He will 
come to Penn State about October 
first. 

Miss Madge T. Bogart, of the Syra- 
cuse University faculty, has been ap- 
pointed head of the home economics 
extension work to succeed Miss Mac- 
Donald. She is a native of Minne- 
sota, having studied at the University 
of Minnesota, the Oskosh Normal 
School, and later at the Teachers' 
College at Columbia University. 



N E W C M M A ND A N T 

Captain G. L. Febiger is the new 
Commandant at Penn State, succeed- 
ing Major M. D. Welty, who has been 
transferred to Fort Leavenworth, Kan- 
sas, as a student officer in the Com- 
mand and Staff School. Captain Febig- 
er has been at Penn State for several 
years and was second in command last 
year. Two new officers, Captain W. 
E. Bashore and Captain B. A. Shipp, 
have been assigned to duty at the col- 
lege, while Captain G. N. Randolph 
and Captain Long who were here last 
year, have been transferred to other 
duty. 



CALENDAR 

TUESDAY, September 11 
Registration Day. 

WEDNESDAY, September 12 
Opening convocation, 10 : 30, in Au- 
ditorium. Members of the Faculty are 
asked to attend and occupy seats on 
the platform. The doors will open 
promptly at 10 : 15 a. in. 

THURSDAY, September 13 
Council of Administration meets, 
10:00, President's office. 

FRIDAY, September 14 
Y. M. C. A. reception for new stu- 
dents, 7:00, Front Campus. 

SUNDAY, September 10 
Chapel Speaker — The Rev. Dr. Hugh 
Black, of Union Theological Seminary. 

school - of^d1jca¥ion^ 

At the June meeting of the Board 
oi Trustees action was taken creating 
a new School of Education, coordinate 
with the other schools of the College, 
to consist of the following depart- 
ments: Department of Education and 
Psychology, from the School of Lib- 
eral Arts ; Department of Industrial 
Teachers' Training, from the Schools 
ill Engineering and Mines; the Divis- 
ion of Agricultural Education of the 
Department of Rural Life, from the 
School of Agriculture; and the Depart- 
ment o'f Home Economics. 

The trustees also designated Dean 
Chambers as the head of the new 
school and provided that the Summer 
Session and Teachers' Training Ex- 
tension be administered by the School 
of Education. The new school is the 
seventh at the College and the second 
to be established since the coming of 
President Thomas. 

NEW DEPARTMENTS 
By vote of the Board of Trustees 
there has been established in the 
School of Liberal Arts a Department 
of Philosophy, which department will 
include instruction in Philosophy, Log- 
ic and Ethics. Professors E. W. 
Runkle and R. H. Dotterer, formerly 
O'f the Department of Education and 
Psychology, which was transferred to 
the School of Education, constitute 
the present personnel of the new de- 
partment, with Dr. Runkle as head 
with the title of "Professor of Phil- 
osophy." 

By action of the trustees the De- 
partment of Rural Life in the School 
of Agriculture will be known hereaft- 
er as the "Department of Agricultur- 
al Economics." 

o 

DEPARTMENT HEADS 
All Heads of Departments are re- 
quested to advise the Bulletin Editor, 
175 Old Main, of resignations and new 
appointments in their departments. 
This should be done in writing as soon 
as possible so that the Bulletin mail- 
ing list can be brought up to date. 



13 U /. I ;: E L D G 



• D . CT.OC- 



a U C .< i T T 



i 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
Items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor. 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 3 



State College, Pa., September 18, 1923 



NUMBER 2 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

COLLEGE SENATE 

The College Senate will meet on 
Thursday evening, September 20 at 
7:30 in the Foyer of the Auditorium. 



PERSONNEL 01 COUNCIL 

The personnel of the Council of Ad- 
ministration is as follows: President 
Thomas; R. H. Smith, Comptroller: 
Deans Ray, Wnrnock, Watts, Cham- 
bers, Sackett, Stoddart and Holbrook; 
and W. S. Hoffman, Registrar, secre- 
tary. 



PROP JUNIOR OBATOBICALS 

By Trustee action at the August 
meeting it was decided that the Soph- 
omore Extemporaneous Speaking Con- 
test would be substituted for the an- 
nual Junior Oratorical Contest. Lack 
of interest in the latter in recent years 
made this step seem advisable. 



FACULTY RECEPTION 

The annua! reception to the Faculty 
given by President and Mrs. Thomas 
and the University Club, will be held 
at the club house on Friday evening 
of this week at 9:00. The reception 
will be formal. Department heads are 
urged to see that the new members of 
their departments are informed of the 
reception and are invited to attend. 



--o- 



NEW STUDENTS 

Registration figures given out by the 
Registrar's Office at noon last Friday 
indicated a total of 1073 new students 
in college this fall. Of that number. 110 
are women. They are classified as fol- 
lows: 

Freshmen — 865 men, 84 women. 

Sophomores — 28 men, 1C women. 

Juniors — 9 men, 8 women. 

Seniors — 1 man, 1 woman. 

Unclassified — 8 men, 5 women. 

Two-Year Ag.— 40 men. 2 women. 

Graduate — 5 men. 



USE THE BULLETIN 

The Faculty Bulletin is issued for 
the convenience of members of the Fac- 
ulty. It affords a medium of communi- 
cation with every member of the col- 
lege instructional staff. Official an- 
nouncements and notices of general in- 
terest will be printed if they are sent 
to the editor. The Bulletin is yours. 
Make use of it. . 



RESIGNS AS REGISTRAR 

Professor A. H. Espcnshade, for 14 
years the College Registrar, has re- 
signed in order to devote all of his 
time to a completion of the Building 
Fund Campaign of which he is vice- 
director. During nib time as registrar 
and admission officer it is estimated 
that he admitted approximately 85 per 
cent, of the total number of students 
enrolled in the history of the College. 
Professor Espenshade has been con- 
nected with the College for the past 
twenty-five years, having been pro- 
fessor of rhetoric prior to assuming 
the duties of registrar. Former As- 
sistant Registrar William S. Hoffman 
has been appointed to the office and 
has had charge of the admission of 
this year's Freshman class. 

■ fv 

TRUSTEES ELECTED 

A< a result of the June election of 
Trustees, the following were declared 
members of the Board for a term of 
three years beginning July 1. 1923: 
Elected by Alumni- -H. Walton Mitch- 
el!. Pittsburgh; J. F. Shields. Philadel- 
phia; and J. L. Mamill, Columbus, 
Ohio; elected by County Agricultural 
ao.d Engineering Societies — Vance C. 
McCormick. Harrisburg: E. R. Pette- 
1m, ne, Wilkes-Barre ; Charles M. 
Schwab, Loretto; and John S. Fisher. 
Indiana. Mr. Fisher was the only new 
member elected to the board and he 
fills the place made vacant by the 
death of the late Senator W. E. Crow. 

o 

DEPARTMENT HE A I)S 

Heads of Departments who have not 
already done so are again requested to 
advise the Bulletin Editor in writing 
of resignations and new appointments 
in their departments. As soon as such 
information is received the mailing list 
will lie corrected. 

o- 

( A MPAIGN RE C El PIS 

The following list of campaign re- 
ceipts for the past week shows en- 
couraging signs of vitality: 

Amount 

Chester *14»4 

Butler 1095 

Montgomery 500 

Colorado 200 

Delaware (county) 200 

Ohio 150 

Vermont 150 

Washington (county) 150 

Bradford 1(M) 

Delaware (state) 100 

Rhode Island »0 

Tioga 40 

'Indiana (county) 23 

Allegheny *> 



CALENDAR 



THURSDAY, September 20 

College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Audi- 



torium. 



FRIPAY, September 21 

Faculty Reception at University 
Club, 9:00 p. m. Formal. 

SUNDAY, September 23 

Chapel Speaker — Dr. Lewis S. Mudge, 
Stated Clerk of the General Assembly, 
Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia. 

NEW MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP 

The Trustees at their August meet- 
ing approved the action of the Presi- 
dent of the College and the President 
of the Board in accepting $5000 from 
the "More Sheep More Wool Associa- 
tion" for the establishment of a schol- 
arship or fellowship at the College, 
adopting the following resolution: 

Resolved. That the Pennsylvania 
State College accept with sincere grat- 
itude the gift of $5000 from the More 
Sheep More Wool Association of the 
United States as the foundation of a 
memorial scholarship, to be known as 
the "Arthur C. Bigelow Memorial Schol- 
arship" and that the iSchool of Agricul- 
ture lie directed to carry out the pro- 
visions of the agreement of the College 
with the donors. The Trustees desire 
to record their deep appreciation of 
this gift and their conviction of its 
value in the promotion of the sheep 
industry of Pennsylvania. 



FEE INCREASE 

At the August meeting of the Board 
of Trustees it was decided to increase 
the incidental fee from $50 to $100 
per year, applicable to all students. 
While the step was taken only from 
financial necessity. It should be point- 
ed out that the new fee is not larger 
in proportion to the cost of conducting 
the College than was the former fee 
when it was established many years 
ago. The current State appropriation 
for maintenance is not sufficient to 
support the present program of the 
College, much less to provide for the 
increasing costs which are inevitable 
in a growing institution which is re- 
solved to keep its work and its stan- 
dards abreast of the best educational 
practice. Without this increase of 
revenue less than 200 Freshmen couM 
have been admitted. 



ROAD SIGNS 



$4257 



The Department of Public Informa- 
tion still has a number of road signs 
to be placed and it will be appreciated 
if faculty members who expect to take 
auto trips this fall will aid in placing 
them. 






. 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty- 



The Pennsylvania State College 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor. 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 3 



State College, Pa., September 25. 1923 



NUMBER 3 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

RETURN FACULTY BLANKS 

Members of the faculty who have not 
already done so are requested to fill out 
at once the blank asking their name, 
address, phone number, etc., and to re- 
turn it to the President's Office. This 
information is needed for the student 
and faculty directory. Faculty mem- 
bers should also notify the President's 
Office of any change of address during 
the year. 

o — ■ 

OFFICE HOURS 

Beginning this week the hours of the 
College Scheduling Officer will be as fol- 
lows: Tuesday, Thursday and Satur- 
day, 8:00 to 11:00 a. m.; Monday, Tues- 
day, Thursday and Friday, 1:30 to 5:00 
p. m. — C. P. Maclnnis. 

_ 

STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
,students have left college: 
Freshmen 

Eddy, Miss Gladys, AL 
Miller, Tom R„ Ag 



TEACHING STAFF 

Each member of the teaching staff is 
asked to send to Mr. C. P. Maclnnis, 
the scheduling officer, a copy of lhis ac- 
tual schedule indicating the room, num- 
ber and building, in which be is located 
at any given time. This information 
should be in the Panels of Mr. Maclnnis 
before October first. 

UNIVERSITY CLUB 

The new social program of t(he Uni- 
versity Club was issued last week. On 
Saturday evening of this week there 
will be a card party at the club for 
members and their partners. Mrs. 
D. S. Cryder will be the hostess. 
o 

HONORED WITH OFFICE 

Dr. R. A. Dutcher, of the department 
of chemical agriculture, returned last 
week from the annual meeting of the 
American Chemical Society where he 
read -several papers on the research 
work accomplished at the college dur- 
ing the past year. At the meeting, Dr. 
Dutcher was made secretary of the 
Biochemical Section for the year 1923- 
24. He recently addressed the National 
Vegetable Growers Association at Buf- 
falo on "The Vitamin Content of Veg- 
etables and Fruits." 

o— 

FIRST FOOTBALL GAME 

The opening game of the Penn State 
football schedule will be played on Sat- 
urday afternoon on New Beaver Field 
•with Lebanon Valley as the opposing 
eleven. The game will start at 2:30. 



LEAVES OF ABSENCE 

The college board of trustees has vot- 
ed to approve the following recommen- 
dation relative to Leave of Absence for 
Graduate Study and Sabbatical Leave: 

"Leaves of absence to be granted for 
Graduate Work or for work of some 
other kind that will make a member of 
the staff more valuable to the institu- 
tion. 

"These leaves of absence to be nomi- 
nated by the Head of a Department, re- 
commended by the Dean of the School 
approved by the President of the Col- 
lege, and granted by the Board of Trus- 
tees under the following conditions: 

"1. Two years of service at The 
Pennsylvania State College are first re- 
quired. 

"2. The leave is to be for one year, 
but may be extended for a second year 
under exceptional circumstances. 

"3. Salary to the absentee is to be 
determined on recommendation by the 
Dean, and is to be so far as possible 
one-third of the absentee's regular sal- 
ary, provided the amount paid to him 
during his absence is not less than $500 
nor more than $1000. If the leave is to 
be extended for an additional year, tlhe 
absentee is to receive no salary the 
second year. 

"4. The absentee is to return to the 
college at the salary he was receiving 
when he left and must stay for two 
years or refund the money received by 
him during his leave. This does not 
mean that 'his salary may not be in- 
creased during the two-year period, if 
:t seems desirable to do so. 

"It is recommended that these regu- 
lations go into effect at once." 

o 

ENROLLMENT 

On the back of this week's Bulletin is 
given the complete enrollment of the 
college by schools, courses and classes 
up to [September 15. The enrollment 
has steadily increased since that date 
and figures announced by the Regis- 
trar's office to September 20 give the 
total registration as 320G. This does 
not include graduate students. 

— o 

CAMPAIGN RECEIPTS 

Campaign receipts for the past week 
were as follows: 

Amount 

Ohio ? 1105 

Huntingdon — 50 ° 

Warren — •• 400 

Chester 200 

Butler - 10 ° 

Louisiana - ^® 

Washington (county) 10 ° 

Bucks - f° 

Perry 50 

York - " 

Total * 2612 



CALENDAR 

SATURDAY, September 29 

Football, Penn State vs. Lebanon 
Valley, New Beaver, 2:30. 

Card Party, University Club. 

SUNDAY, September 30 

Chapel Speaker — Dr. Harry Burton 
Boyd, of tlhe Park Presbyterian Church, 
Erie, Pa. 



COLLEGE MEAT 

Continuing the practice inaugurated 
last year, the Animal Husbandry de- 
partment will have meat on sale at the 
Stock Judging Pavilion during the first 
semester at the hours scheduled below. 
The meats offered are of high quality 
and are produced by the college. An 
exceptionally fine flock of lambs will be 
slaughtered during the semester as well 
as a number of fine beef animals. 
Plenty of good pork will also be offered. 
Sales are for cash only. 

Tlhe hours are as follows: 

Monday— 4:00 to 5:00 p. m. 

Tuesday— 9:00 to 12:00 a. m.; 2:00 to 
3:00 p. m. 

Wednesday— 11:00 to 12:00 a. m. 

Thursdaj — 9:00 to 12:00 a. m.; 3: On 
to 5:00 p. m. 

Friday— 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. 

Saturday— 9 : 00 to 12:00 a. m. 



REPORTED MISSING 
Professor Charles F. Shaw, former 
head of the soils department of this col- 
lege and more recently a member of the 
faculty of the University of California, 
is among those reported missing in the 
Berkeley fire disaster, according to 
newspaper reports. Professor Shaw in 
1912 completed the mapping of all Penn- 
sylvania soil types, a job that took 
three years and entailed visits to all 
parts of the state. Thomas F. Hunt, 
former dean of tlhe Penn State school of 
agriculture, is now dean of the Cali- 
fornia agricultural college, and also was 
in the fire zone. 



JUDGING TEAM WINS 
With the highest score ever made in 
the intercollegiate judging contest at 
the Eastern States Exposition, the live- 
stock judging team from this college 
won first honors at Springfield and cap- 
tured the handsome silver cup. The 
team was coached by Professors F. L. 
Bentley and M. F. Grimes of the ani- 
mal husbandry department and this 
marks the third successive year that 
Penn State has taken first place. The 
team will represent the college in the 
intersectional contest at the Interna- 
tional Livestock Show in Chicago in 
November. 



ENROLLMENT OF STUDENTS 

BY SCHOOLS, CLASSES AND COURSES 

ON SEPTEMBER 15, 1923. 

SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 

Seniors Juniors Soph. Fresh. 2-yr. Total 

Agro. 10 7 

A. H. 17 17 

Bot. 3 1 

Ch. Ag. 8 11 

D. H. 16 34 

For. 3 IS 19 

Hort 21 18 

L. Arch 3 2 14 

P. H. 5 1 

Agric. 107 134 

First year __ 54 

Second year 49 

Total 86 109 140 134 103 572 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

Ag. Ed. 19 17 17 16 

H. E. 9 16 15 10 

T. T. 29 37 40 48 

V. H. E. ___ 16 21 23 22 

Total 73 91 95 96 355 

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

A. E. 7 11 24 28 

Arch. 1 8 

Ech. E. 10 7 

E. E. 58 78 140 143 

C. E. 24 32 66 76 

I. E. 24 25 42 57 

Mllg. 1 

M. E. 36 49 62 85 

R. M. E. 

S. E. 3 3 

Total ___ 164 213 334 389 1100 
SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS 

C. & F. 63 95 116 111 

A. & L. 26 37 39 59 

Pre-Legal __ 21 16 40 41 

Total ___ 110 148 195 211 664 
SCHOOL OF MINES 

Met. 15 10 13 

Mng. 4 16 30 56 

M. Geol. ___ 4 2 5 

Total 23 28 48 56 155 

SCHOOL OF NATURAL SCIENCE 

Chem. 6 15 43 34 

Ind. Chem. _ 19 16 

Nat. Sci ___ 4 6 2 7 

Pre.Med. ___ 6 13 40 53 

Phys. 2 2 1 2 

Total 37 52 86 96 271 

Grand Total 490 639 898 982 103 3117 



, 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor. 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 3 



State College, Pa., October 2, 1923 



NUMBER 4 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 

Sophomores 
Ball, Donald N„ Ch 
Ridgway, William G., IE 

Freshmen 

Dombrowski, John J., EB 
Millard, Cyrus D., Ph 
Richwine, W. King, IB 
VanCleve, John E., For 
— o ■ 

NOTICE TO INSTRUCTORS 

No person is permitted to attend 
class or laboratory exercises unless he 
or she presents a schedule card signed 
by a dean and stamped by the Treas- 
urer. This applies to auditors as well 
as to those taking courses for credit, 
except that parents of students, super- 
intendents of schools,, etc., may occa- 
sionally visit classes. — John M. Thomas. 
Ptfcsident. 



SENATE COMMITTEES 

President Thomas with the advice of 
the Committee on Committees of the 
Senate has appointed the following 
committees for 1923-24, the first named 
in each case being chairman: 

Admission: Professors Hoffman. 
Bressler, Dengler and Espenshade. 

Athletics: Dean Holbrook, Profes- 
sors Bezdek, Ham, Keller and A. E. 
Martin. 

Student Welfare: Professor Fletch- 
er, Deans Ray and Warnock, Profes- 
sors Dusham and Simmons. 

Publications: Mr. Cresswell, Profes- 
sors Chedsey, W. S. Dye, Jr., Kocher, 
and Parkinson. 

Academic: Professors Walker, D. A. 
Anderson, Dutcher and Moore, Acting 
College Examiner. 

Courses of Study: Deans Stoddart 
and Chambers, Professors Ferguson, 
Kinsloe and McFarland. 

Research: Dean Kern, Professors 
Boucke, Chandlee, E. B. Forbes and 
Hechler. 



DR. MARQUARDT OX LEAVE 

Dr. C. E. Marquardt College Exam- 
iner, has been granted a year's leave 
of absence to pursue graduate study 
as an Austin Scholar in the Harvard 
Graduate School of Education. In his 
absence, Dr. B. V. Moore is serving asj 
College Examiner. 



SENATE MEMBERSHIP 

The following is the personnel of the 
College Senate for the year 1923-24: 

General Administrative Officers: J. 

M. Thomas, President; R. H. Smith, 
.Comptroller; A. R. Warnock, Dean of 
Men; Miss Charlotte E. Ray, Dean of 
Women; Hugo Bezdek, Physical Edu- 
cation ; G. L. Febiger, Military Science 
and Tactics; J. P. Ritenour, College 
Physician; E. W. Runkle, Librarian; 
M. S. McDowell, Director of Agricultural 
Extension; and W. S. Hoffman, Regis- 
trar and Secretary of the Senate. 

School of Agriculture: R. L. Watts, 
Dean; II. U. Blasingame, A. A. Borland, 
R. G. Bressler. W r . V. Dennis, R. A. 
Dutcher. J. A. Ferguson, S. W. Fletch- 
-, F. D. Gardner, D. E. Haley, F. D. 
Kern, H. C. Knandel, C. R. Orton, W. 
H. Tomhave. 

Institute of Animal Nutrition: E. B. 

Forbes, Director. 

School of Education: W. G. Chamb- 
ers, Dean; D. A- Anderson, Miss Edith 
P. Chace, J. E. DeCamp, A. S. Hurrell, 
C. Everett Myers, H. G. Parkinson, 
Miss Sara M. Wilson. 

School of Engineering': R. B. Sackett, 
Dean; P. B. Breneman, C. E. Govier, 
C. L. Harris, F. G. Hec'hler, J. O. Keller, 
C. L. Kinsloe, A. L. Kocher, H. B. 
Shattuck, E. D. Walker, A. J. Wood. 

School of the Liberal Arts: C. W. 
Stoddart, Dean; O. F. Boucke, W. D. 
Crockett, W. S. Dye, Jr., I. L. Foster. 
R. W. Grant, C. W. Hasek, A. E. Martin, 
Miss L. V. T. Simmons, Jacob Tanger. 
J. H. Tudor, C. C. Wagner. 

School of Mines: E. A. Holbrook, 
Dean; C. A. Bonine, W. R. Chedsey. 
A. P. Honess, O. A. Knight, D. F. Mc- 
Farland, C. W. Robinson. 

School of Natural Science: C. W. 
Stoddart, Acting Dean; R. D. Cassel- 
berry, G. C. Chandlee. D. C. Duncan, 
E H. Ouabain, W. R. Ham, L. R. Parks. 



CALENDAR 



CALENDAR COMMITTEE 

Upon recommendation of the College 
Senate, President Thomas has appoint- 
ed the following committee on the Col- 
lege Calendar: Dean Warnock, chair- 
man; Dean Chambers, Professors P. 
B. Breneman, W. S. Dye, Jr., and Mc- 
Farland. 



SCHOOL LUNCH 



FOOTBALL 

North Carolina will be the second 
opponent for Penn State on the grid- 
iron thjs fan, th,e, game being fcheduhjd. 
for SafaF&fy \\ 3:3*0. 



Beginning October 2, School Lunch 
will be served by the Senior Home 
Economics students in Room 14 of the 
Women's Building at 12:15 on Tues- 
days, Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Fri- 
days. Anyone wishing a hot noon meal 
is welcome. Customers who are more 
or less regular will be appreciated and 
an endeavor will be made, as far as 
possible, to make gpeoja.1 arrangements 
£o'f tTj^Ki. 



SATURDAY, October <> 

Football, Penn State vs. North Car- 
olina, 2:30. 

Club night at University Club. 

SUNDAY, October 7 

Chapel Speaker — Dr. Francis Shunlc 
Downs, of the First Presbyterian 
Church, Tyrone. 



THE CAMPAIGN 

Campaign receipts for the past week 
were as follows : 

Amount 

McKean $0233 

Erie 500 

Washington (County) 110 

Chester 95 

New Jersey 25 

Northumberland , 25 

Total , , $6988 

In three days and a half Professor 
C. L. Goodling secured $6233 in Mc- 
Kean County, putting that county over 
the top. He feels sure of getting about 
$5000 more as soon as he can find time 
to go back and complete his canvass. 
Who will follow Professor Goodling's 
example? There is plenty of good ter- 
ritory not yet preempted. 

Through the efforts of Professor H. 
C. Knandel all the graduates in the 
department of Poultry Husbandry have 
subscribed to the Campaign fund. This 
is the first department Whose gradu- 
ates have "come across" one hundred 
per cent. Who will be the next head 
of department to render a similar ser- 
vice to the Compaign? 

Receipts still come in slowly solely 
because of lack of workers. 

o 

MANY THANKS 

The Faculty Bulletin believes that it 
voices the sentiment of the entire Fac- 
ulty in expressing many thanks to the 
Athletic Association for the compli- 
mentary season tickets which have been 
distributed to faculty members through 
the various deans' offices. Penn State 
is one of the few institutions where 
members of the faculty are given such 
consideration, and it is greatly appreci- 
ated. 

o 

NEW BOOK BY DR. SPARKS 

A new book entitled "Worth While 
Europeans', written by Dr. E. E. 
Sparks, w; s published this summer by 
Weidenhamer and Company, of Phila- 
delphia, '"'here are 410 pages in the 
volume and twenty illustrations. The 
book is im ended for the use of pupils 
in the grammar grades of the public 
schools. II is the second in his "Worth 
While" aeries. The third is to be on 
"Worth Whj]e Petmsylvarji-ans." 



:;■:»■• - •• ft ■c^.a-i:. 



J . H . CROCKETT , 

- '% 13 UA I N ELHG 



I 1; : vine?* 

. D ■■ IV. , ,9M 



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i.: 1) ., ' "'. i.dit/ 



-..'/. . -. 'J 



! «f '■■ 



'.■'.;* v.,' V- ; ' '■"' *'* "■-■" 









Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



VOLUME 3 



e Pennsylvania State C 

J |)TT1 



State College, Pa., October 9, 1923 



O 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



NUMBER 5 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

ADDRESS CHANGES 
In order to have the student and fac- 
ulty directory as accurate as possible, 
faculty members are again asked to ad- 
vise the President's office at once of 
any changes in address, either home or 
office, or of telephone number. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 
During the past week the following 
students have left college: 

Junior 

Everett, Frank M., For. 
Sophomores 

Dorman, Frederick B., CE 

Dcve, Donald S., Ag 

Hanna, A. W., Agro 
! Hissom, Gail D., For 
! Hughes, C. G., EE 
i Swartwood, G. F., EE 
: Wilson, L. K, ICh 

Freshmen 

j Durnell, Russell H., AH 
Hutchison, B. M., EchE 
Miller, Joseph P., Ag 
Nauss, M. S., EE 
Watson, H. H., AL 



GEABUATE SCHOOL COMMITTEES 

The following committees of the 
Graduate School faculty have been ap- 
pointed by Dean Kern with the approv- 
al of President Thomas: 

Executive Committee: Dean Kern, 
chairman ex-officio; Professors Wood, 
Ham, McFarland, A. E. Martin, and 
Runkle. 

Committee on Courses of Study: 
Professot D. A. Anderson, chairman; 
Dean Holbrook, Professor Dutcher. 

Committee on Admissions: Professor 
Hill, chairman; Professors Moore and 
D C. Duncan. 

FACULTY INYITED 
The committee on Alumni Homecom- 
ing of the Alumni Association has ex- 
tended a cordial invitation to all mem- 
bers of the faculty and the college ad- 
ministrative staff to attend the cider 
party in the Armory, on Saturday 
evening, October 20. This will be one 
of the big events of Homecoming Day 
and a most enjoj'able time is anticip- 
ated. 



LE CERCLE FRANCAIS 
Le Cercle Francais will hold its first 
meeting on Wednesday evening, Octo- 
ber 10, at 7:30 in the Old Chapel. Mr. 
Albert Robin, a new member of the 
Romance Language Department, will 
deliver a lecture in French on "Fran- 
cois Villon". Members of the faculty 
] a,nd their friends are cordially invited 
to attend. 



NAYY GAME TICKETS 
Regulations for the distribution of 
faculty tickets for the Navy game were 
not drawn up until too late for publi- 
cation in last week's Bulletin. Facul- 
ty members who have not already 
complied with the method of securing 
tickets should do so today, Tuesday, at 
the latest. All seats for the game will 
bo reserved and no one will be admitt- 
ed by coupon. 

Faculty members can secure special 
envelope-application blanks at the 
Treasurer's Office today. The compli- 
mentary coupon book entitles the hold- 
er to one $2.50 seat, or in case, of mar- 
ried faculty members, to two such 
tickets. The number 5 coupon must 
be enclosed in the envelope. Faculty 
members may also purchase additional 
t'ekets by ordering same on the blank 
and enclosing the necessary money or 
check. 

All applications must be turned in to 
the Treasurer's office today. The tick- 
ets may then be obtained at the Treas- 
vrer's office on Thursday of this week. 

o 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 
Figures announced by Dean Kern of 
the Graduate School show that there 
are 113 graduate students enrolled for 
the present semester. Of this number, 
92 are actually carrying class work, 
which is a large increase over last 
year. Eight are working on thesis on- 
ly, while thirteen are candidates for 
technical degrees. Ten graduate stud- 
ents are women. 

A total of 35 new students are tak- 
ing graduate work this year, 17 of them 
being graduates of Penn State and IS 
having come from other institutions. 
Sixteen graduate students have already 
attained the Master's degree but are 
now continuing advanced work in the 
Graduate School. 

The newly created rank of Graduate 
Assistant became effective for the first 
time this fall and there are now 15 
graduate assistants at Penn State. 

o 

COLLEGE BULLETINS 
The attention of facility members 
concerned is called to the fact that 
all college bulletins or publications 
■must pass through the hands of the 
College Bulletin Editor, Mr. D. M. 
Cresswell, before being sent to the 
printer. The Purchasing Agent will not 
honor requisitions for printing unless 
the manuscript bears the approval of 
Mr. Cresswell. The object is to have 
some degree of uniformity in all col- 
lege publications. 

o 

FOOTBALL 
Penn State will meet Gettysburg on 
New Beaver Field next Saturday at 
2:30. The game will be preceded by a 
Freshman game with Carnegie Tech 
Freshmen, on Old Beaver, at 1:00. 



CALENDAR 

WEDNESDAY, October 10 
Le Cercle Francais, Old Chapel, 7:30. 

THURSDAY, October 11 

Sousa and His Band, Auditorium, 
3:30 and 8:30. 

SATURDAY, October 13 
Football: Penn State Freshmen vs. 
Carnegie Tech Freshmen, Old Beaver, 
1:00; Penn State vs. Gettysburg, New 
Eeaver, 2:30. 

Club night at University Club. 

SUNDAY, October 14 
Chapel Speaker — Bishop Alexander 
Mann, D.D., of Trinity Church, Pitts- 
burgh. 

SOUSA AND HIS BAND 

The first number of the Y. M. C. A. 
and Department of Music entertain- 
ment course this year will be held on 
October 11. John Philip Sousa, noted 
composer and bandmaster, will come 
to State College with his famous band 
on that evening and appear in the Audi- 
torium. This promises to be a feature 
number of the series, but the others 
are of equal calibre and the entire 
course is a treat to Penn (State audi- 
ences. Course tickets are on sale 
through the Y. M. C. A. 

Arrangements have also been made 
for an afternoon concert at 3:30 in the 
Auditorium. Course tickets will admit 
to the evening concert only. 

o 

CAMPAIGN NOTES 
Campaign receipts for the past week 
were as follows: 

Amount 

Westmoreland $1791 

Massachusetts 160 

McKean 160 

Maryland 100 

Missouri _ 50 

New Jersey 50 

Allegheny - 30 

Cumberland 24 

Centre - 18 

Montana 10 

Total ------ $2393 

There are in Pennsylvania 3242 al- 
umni and former students who have 
not yet contributed to the Campaign 
fund. Of these, 472 live in Allegheny 
county, and 259 in Philadelphia. Other 
counties that have 75 or more non- 
contributors among alumni and former 
students are Berks, Blair, Centre, 
Chester, Erie, Luzerne, Montgomery, 
and Westmoreland. 

In Westmoreland county during the 
past week Professor Torrence secured 
ttwelve pledges from alumni aggregat- 
ing $750, and ten pledges from former 
students totaling $1071. 



r\ r t> C K ■ ''- T T • 
-j i r U A I N B L P 5 • 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



Th< 



¥H 



Pennsylvania State College 

ULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 3 



State College, Pa., October 16, 1923 



NUMBER 6 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

COLLEGE SENATE 
The regular meeting of the College 
Senate will be held on Thursday even- 
ing, October 18, at 7:30 in the Foyer of 
the Auditorium. 



Phys.- 
Zool- 



-W. R. Ham, Physics Bldg 
•E. H. Dusham, Zool. Lab. 



Phys. Ed. & Ath. — Hugo Bezdek, Gym. 
Mil. Sci. & Tac— G. L. Pebiger, Armory 



BULLETIN COPY 
All notices for next week's issue of 
j the Bulletin must be in the hands of 
the editor by 12:00 noon on Friday, 
October 19. 

DEPARTMENTAL DIRECTORY 
Due to the changes that have been 
made in various departments, and as 
a convenience to members of the fac- 
ulty, the following departmental direc- 
tory has been compiled, giving- the 
name of the department, its head, and 
the office location: 

Agriculture 

Agr. Econ. — R. G. Bressler, 111 Ag. 
Agro. — F. D. Gardner, 201 Ag. 
A. H — W. H. Tomhave, 203 Ag. 
Bot.— F. D. Kern, Bot. Bldg. 
Chem. Ag. — R. A. Dutcher, 213 Ag. 

D. H.— A. A. Borland, 151 Dairy 

F. Mach.— R. U. Blasingame,108 Ag. 
For. — J. A. Ferguson, Forestry 
Hort— S. W. Fletcher, 102 Hort. 
P. H— H. C. Knandel, 206 Hort. 
Ag. Ext.— M. S. McDowell, 102 Ag. 
An. Nutrition — E. B. Forbes, 21 Ag. 

Education 

Agr. Ed.— H. G. Parkinson, 201 Hort. 
Ed. & Psy— D. A. Anderson, 21 L. A. 
Home Econ. — Miss Chace, 8 W. B. 

Engineering 
Arch. — A. L. Kocher, 25 Eng. F 
C. E— E. D. Walker, 200 Eng. A 

E. E — C. L. Kinsloe, 203 Eng. D 
I. E.— J. O. Keller, 202 Eng. C 

M. E— A. J. Wood, 2 Old Mng. 

Metis. & Mat. Constr. — P. B. Breneman, 

204 Eng. A. 
Eng. Exten.— N. C. Miller, Eng. F. 
Eng. Exp. Sta— F. G. Hechler, Eng. F. 

Liberal Arts 

Clas. Lan.— W. D. Crockett, 313 Main 

Econ. & Soc. — O. F. Boucke (Acting), 
17 L. A. 
! English— W. S. Dye, Jr. (Acting) 309 
| Main 

German — Miss Simmons, 18 L. A. 

Hist. & Pol. Sci.— A. E. Martin, 17 L. A. 
( Math.— C. C. Wagner (Acting), 10 L. A. 
[ Music— R. W. Grant, Auditorium 
j Philosophy — E. W. Runkle, Library 
I Rom. Lan.— I. L. Foster, 120 Main 

Mines 

Giedl. & Min — C. A. Bonine, 205 Old 

Mng. 
Met.— D. F. McFarland, 115 Old Mng. 
Mining— W. R. Chedsey, 102 Old Mng. 

Natural Science 
Chem.— G. C. Chandlee, Chem. Bldg. 



THE BIG WEEK-END 
The greatest crowd of alumni and 
general visitors in the history of Penn 
State is expected here on Saturday, 
Alumni Homecoming Day. The big at- 
traction will be the football game with 
the Navy at 2:30 on New Beaver Field. 
The demand for tickets to this game 
has been unprecedented. In order to 
avoid last minute congestions at the 
entrances and aisles, faculty members 
are urged to get to their seats as early 
as (possible, and in this way may be 
sure of seeing the first kickoff. 

Faculty members are invited to join 
the alumni at the big cider party in 
the Armory on Saturday evening. A 
football mass meeting is booked for 
Friday night, and a Freshman football 
game with Kiski will be played at 10:00 
Saturday morning. 



RELIGIOUS PREFERENCES 
The following compilation showing 
the religious preferences of members 
of the incoming Freshman class has 
just been completed by the Registrar's 
office. Presbyterians again lead with 
245, followed by Methodists with 209. 
Lutherans and Roman Catholics are 
tied for third place with 120 each. The 
list is as follows: 

Presbyterians 245 

Methodist - 209 

Lutheran - 120 

Roman Catholic 120 

Reformed - 65 

Protestant Episcopal 54 

Hebrew 25 

Baptist 20 

Congregational .._ 15 

United Presbyterian 14 

United Brethren 14 

Evangelical - 12 

Society of Friends 9 

Church of Christ - 4 

Christian Science 4 

Unitarian 3 

Brethren - 3 

Moravian 2 

United Evangelical 2 

Russian Orthodox -.. 1 

Spiritualist 1 

Church of God -•• 1 

No preference 15 

Total 958 



UNIVERSITY CLUB 
The Penn State Players will produce 
a number of one-act plays at the Uni- 
v< rsity Club on Friday evening of th ■- 
week. Club members and their part- 
ners are invited. 



THURSDAY, October 18 
Agricultural Faculty meeting, 4:30, 
103 Ag. 

College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Audi- 
torium. 

FRIDAY, October 19 

Penn State Players at University 
Club. 

SATURDAY, October 20 

Alumni Homecoming Day. Football, 
Penn State Freshmen vs. Kiski, 10:00; 
Penn State vs. Navy, 2:30. Cider 
Party in Armory, 8:00. 

SUNDAY, October 21 

Chapel Speaker — Dr. C. A. Barbour, 
President Rochester Theological Sem- 
inary, Rochester, N. Y. 

CAMPAIGN NOTES 

Campaign receipts for the past week 
were as follows: 



Westmoreland 


Amount 
$2645 


Virginia 

Clarion 


725 
100 


Iowa _ 

Allegheny , 

Ohio .., 


100 

50 

32 


Armstrong . 


15 


India 

Luzerne .. 


2 

1 






Total 


$3670 



Centre County contains 164 gradu- 
ates and former students who have not 
yet made a campaign contribution. 
Here is territory close at hand, in which 
several energetic Faculty campaigners 
could do an excellent bit of work. Who 
will volunteer? 

Counties bordering on Centre County 
contain non-subscribers among alumni 
and former students as follows: Blair, 
134; Clearfield, 54; Huntingdon, 33; 
Mifflin, 24; Clinton, 23; Union and 
Snyder, 11. Here are 279 possible sub- 
scribers within easy reach of State Col- 
lege. Who will get their subscriptions? 

Of the 2875 alumni and former stu- 
dents in the United States (outside of 
Pennsylvania) whose addresses are 
known, we have received campaign 
contributions from 750. The number 
who have not contributed is 2125. The 
following are the states that contain 
50 or more non-contributors. These 
eleven states contain nearly three- 
fourths of all the non-contributors 
among alumni and former students in 
the United States (outside of Pennsyl- 
vania) : 

New York, 396; New Jersey, 288; 
Ohio, 248; Illinois, 103; California, 94; 
Maryland, 85; Massachusetts, 78; Dis- 
trict of Columbia, 70; West Virginia, 
70; Michigan, 61; Virginia, 56. 



- «-- • u tv v v* JW t JJ 

313 MAIN BLDQ. 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
Items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BIJLLETI 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor. 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M, each Saturday 



VOLUME 3 



State College, Pa., October 23, 1923 



NUMBER 7 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



ATHLETIC ELIGIBILITY 

The following action concerning ath- 
letic eligibility was taken by the Col- 
lege Senate at its meeting last week: 

The Senate shall formulate regula- 
tions governing the scholastic eligi- 
bility of students to participate in ath- 
letics. It shall be the duty of the Sen- 
ate Committee on Athletics to adminis- 
ter these regulations. Only members of 
the Senate shall be members of this 
Committee. 

The rules of the Athletic Association 
of the College shall govern and pro- 
mote all athletic contests. 

The following regulations governing 
scholastic athletic eligibility were 
adopted : 

Rule 58 and rule 59, 59a and 59b as 
given in the Regulations Affecting Stu- 
dents, published by the College in 1920, 
are adopted with the substitution of the 
words "Senate Committee on Athletics" 
for the words "Faculty Committee on 
Physical Activities" wherever they ap- 
pear. These amended rules are as fol- 
lows: 

58. The Senate Committee on Ath- 
letics shall have jurisdiction over all 
athletic contests; and all schedules of 
athletic contests must be submitted to 
this Committee for approval or modifi- 

I cation before final arrangements or 
contracts are made, and before they be- 
I come effective. 

59. Regular members of athletic 
i teams (or substitutes regularly ap- 
j pointed) are allowed to be absent from 
I College for limited periods and at times 

to be authorized in each case by the 
I Senate Committee on Athletics, as fol- 
i lows: 

(a) In each semester not more than 
! sixty hours, not including chapel ex- 
: ercises, and computed for all college 
! hours covered by the absence of the 

team, regardless of the exact number 
I of hours for which a student is sched- 
! uled. In this computation, Saturday is 
1 reckoned as three hours, and the other 
! days as six hours, four in the morning i 
i and two in the afternoon. 

(b) No athletic contest or game shall 
j be played at the College or elsewhere 
, under the name of The Pennsylvania 
| State College unless approved by the 
j Senate Committee on Athletics. No 

person shall represent the College in 
: such games unless he is a student in 
; regular standing and was duly regis- 
I tered within two weeks of the opening 
J of the semester in which such contest 
or game takes place. 

The following four paragraphs shall 
be substituted for rule 59c: 

A full scholastic report showing 
standing of each athletic candidate and 
embodying recommendations of the 
school in which the candidate is en- 
rolled shall be secured by the Senate 



Committee on Athletics from the office 
of the Dean of the School at the end of 
the first eight weeks of each semester 
and at the end of each semester. 

No student shall represent the Col- 
lege in intercollegiate athletics who 
was conditioned or failed (below 60 per 
cent) in subjects aggregating more than 
six credit hours at the close of the pre- 
ceding semester and who has not re- 
moved the conditions or failures in ex- 
cess of six credit hours, or who is below 
grade (below 60 per cent) in subjects 
aggregating more than six credit hours 
at the close of the preceding eight 
week period. A student declared 
seholastically ineligible because of low 
grades at the end of the first 
eight week period may be declared eli- 
gible at the end of the twelve week 
period, if at that time, he shall have 
not more than 6 credit hours below 
grade (below 60 per cent) as reported 
to the Dean of his School. 

Not later than 48 hours before the 
departure of an athletic team, a list of 
candidates expecting to make the trip 
shall be submitted to the Senate Com- 
mittee on Athletics. No candidate shall 
be allowed to depart on an athletic 
trip without the consent of the Senate 
Committee on Athletics. This commit- 
ter shall furnish a statement to each 
student permitted to make the trip 
certifying as to the cause of his ab- 
sence from class, which statement must 
be submitted by the student to each 
instructor from whose classes he has 
been absent as a result of the trip. 

""aTaTaTsT" 

'The State College Branch of the 
American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science will submit the follow- 
ing program on Monday, October 29, in 
200 Old Mining Building and at the 
University Club. The general topic will 
be "House Heating" or "Fuels and 
Fuel Utilization." 

4:30 p. m.. Room 200 Old Mining: 
Introduction and Discussion of Com- 
bustion Principles, by Dean Holbrook; 
Sources and Types of Natural Fuels, 
by Professor Bonine; Analysis of the 
Cost of a Ton of Coal, by Professor 
Chedsey; Modified and Substitute Fu- 
els, by Professor McFarland. 

6:00 p. m.. Intermission with dinner 
at the University Club. 

7:30 p. m„ Room 200 Old Mining: 
Heating the Small House, by Professor 
Hechler; The Comfort Zone in House 
Heating, by Professor Wood. 

Members of the Association and their 
wives are invited to attend. The meet- 
ing is also open to members of the 
teaching and research staff of the 
schools of Mines and Engineering. 
Reservations for dinner should be made 
through the secretary, J. Ben Hill, at 
the Botany Building, the price being 
seventy cents per plate. 



CALENDAR 

TUESDAY, October 28 

Scholarship Day exercises, Auditor- 
ium. 10:30. 

FRIDAY, October 2(5 

Hallowe'en Revels, masquerade, at 
the University Club. A buffet luncheon 
will be served. Patronesses will be Mrs. 
J P. Ritenour, Mrs. F. W. Haller, and 
Mis. J. R. Haswell. 

SATURDAY, October 27 

Telegraphic returns from Penn State- 
West Virginia game, Auditorium. 

SUNDAY, October 28 

Chapel Speaker— Dr. Alfred E. 
Stearns, Principal of Phillips Academy, 
Andover, Massachusetts. 

MONDAY, October 2!) 

A. A. A. S. meeting, 4:30 p. m., in 
200 Old Mining; dinner at 6:00 p. m., 
University Club; meeting resumed, 
7 : 30, in Old Mining. 



SCHOLARSHIP DAY 

The semi-annual observance of Schol- 
arship Day will take place Tuesday 
morning. October 23, at 10:30 in the 
Auditorium. All college classes will be 
excused for the last two periods in the 
forenoon. President Thomas will pre- 
side at the exercises. 

Dr. George F. Zook, former head of 
the department of history and political 
science at Penn State and now with the 
U. S. Bureau of Education, will deliver 
the address. Scholarship and marks- 
manship medals will be presented, an- 
nouncement will be made of scholar- 
ship awards and of honor society elec- 
tions, and fraternity scholarship cups 
will be awarded. Mrs. Grant will give 
several organ selections. 

Faculty members are urged to attend 
the exercises and occupy seats in the 
audience. Academic costume will not 
be worn. 

o 

CAMPAIGN RECEIPTS 

Campaign receipts for the past week 
were as follows: 

Luzerne $1245 

Montgomery 750 

Washington (County 212 

Centre 2 00 

Michigan HO 

Westmoreland 105 

Allegheny 100 

Bradford 100 

Chester 90 

Carbon 75 

Philadelphia ? 5 

Dauphin 50 

West Virginia 45 

Venango 10 

Total P204 



W - D 'CR0CKE TTt 

3 13 ,V«r,, _, 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 3 



State College, Pa., October 30, 1923 



NUMBER 8 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

NATURAL SCIENCE FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the Fac- 
ulty of the School of Natural Science 
in the Physics Lecture Room on Tues- 
day, October 30, at 4:30 p. m — E. H. 
Dusham, secretary. 

— p o • 

LIBERAL ARTS FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the Lib- 
eral Arts Faculty on Wednesday, Octo- 
ber 31, at 4:30 in room 25 of the Lib- 
eral Arts Building. — L. V. T. Simmo:>s, 
secretary. 

o 

COURSES END 

For the benefit of those instructors 
who are teaching half-semester sub- 
jects, it should be noted that the first 
half of the first semester ends Tuesday, 
November 6, at 5:20 p. m— C. P. Mae- 
Innis, college scheduling officer. 



COURSE REVISIONS 

According to the rules of the College 
Senate five copies of all revisions in 
undergraduate curricula and courses, 
regular and summer sessions, must be 
in the hands of the Chairman of the 
Committee on Courses of Study toy 
November 1, 1923. In addition, it is 
necessary that all information request- 
ed be supplied. — C. W. Stoddart, chair- 
man. 



PROBATION SECTION 

The following students are in the 
men's probation section for the first 
semester 1923-24: 

Bunn, Leonard J. 

Conway, Ward 

Costenbader, E. B. 

Fischer, H. F. 

Hellmich, A. E. 

Jeffrey, John W. 

Long, Isaac W. 

Longenecker, F. W. 

Merriman, T. S. 

Mulholland, A. T. > „■ ; ;,>'< 

Oldfield, R. G. . ,.i ' 

Shreve, B. A. 

Steele, George S. 

Stull, Harold W. 

Swisher, J. H. 

Thomas, G. M. 

Weinman, O. 

Williams, L. T. 1 

Wolfe, Ralph N. 

ROAD MAPS 

The Department of Public Informa- 
tion has on hand a new supply of road 
maps which are available to faculty 
members who find need for them. They 
may be obtained at the office, room 
175 Old Main. 



GEORGIA TECH TICKETS 

Regulations governing the distribu- 
tion of faculty tickets for the Georgia 
Tech game a week from Saturday were 
not drawn up in time for this week's 
issue of the Bulletin. However, it is 
likely that the same system as was 
used for the Navy game will be in 
vogue. 

Envelope-application blanks will pro- 
bably be distributed Tuesday and Wed- 
nesday of this week. They will then 
be returned with the designated cou- 
pon inside, said coupon entitling the 
holder to one $2.50 seat, or in case 
of married faculty members, to two 
such seats. Additional tickets may toe 
purchased at the same time. The or- 
ders will then be filled and tickets re- 
turned next week. No coupons will be 
accepted at the field on the day of the 
game. The Collegian will carry the full 
details of the distribution system. 



CALENDAR 



COMMITTEE ON PROGRAM 

The dedication of the new men's dor- 
mitory, the Frederick Watts Hall, has 
been set for Novemtoer 23. A commit- 
tee on program has been appointed, 
consisting of Dean Watts, chairman; 
Dean Warnock, A. E. Martin, J. H. 
(Mewine and S. K. Hostetter, from the 
College; Judge H. C. Quigley and .1. 
W. Henzey representing the citizens; 
and D. V. Bauder, representing the stu- 
dents. 



FOOTBALL RETURNS 

Telegraphic returns from the Penn 
State-Syracuse football game at Syra- 
cuse on Saturday will be given in the 
Auditorium, starting about 2:00. The 
Penn State Freshmen will play the 
Syracuse Freshmen on New Beaver at 
1:00. 



The number of hours of permissible 
absence from the college on the part of 
the various athletic teams shall be as 
follows: 

For the football team, not to exceed 
45 hours. 

For the baseball team, not to exceed 
60 hours. 

For the basketball team, not to ex- 
ceed 36 hours. 

For the wrestling team, not to exceed 
36 hours. 

For the track team, not to exceed 45 
hours. 

For the tennis team, not to exceed 36 
hours. 

For the soccer team, not to exceed 36 
hours. 

For the lacrosse team, not to exceed 
36 hours. 

For the boxing team, not to exceed 36 
hours. 



TUESDAY, October 30 

Natural Science Faculty meets, 4:30, 
Physics Lecture Room. 

WEDNESDAY, October 81 

Liberal Arts Faculty meets, 4:30, 
Room 25, L.A. 

SATURDAY, November 3 

Football, Penn State Freshmen vs. 
Syracuse Freshmen, 1:00. 

Telegraphic returns from Penn State- 
Syracuse game, Auditorium, 2:00. 

Club night at University Club. 

SUNDAY, November 1 

Chapel Speaker — Dr. Andrew Mutch, 
Presbyterian Church, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

CAMPAIGN RECEIPTS 

Campaign receipts for the past week 
were as follows: 

New York - $1485 

Montgomery 915 

California 100 

Wisconsin 100 

Delaware (County) 100 

Beaver - 75 

Washington (County) 69 

Berks -.. 50 

Perry _.._ 26 

TOTAL - - $2920 

o — 

ADDED TO AG. LIBRARY 

A classified list of all experimental 
projects carried on by the agricultural 
experiment stations of the United 
States has been placed in the library of 
the School of Agriculture. 

The total number of projects carried 
on by the experiment stations in 1922- 
23 was 5,156 or an average of about 
103 per station. The Pennsylvania sta- 
tion hs 123 active experimental pro- 
jects. 

■ -o 

TO ADDRESS UNIY. WOMEN 

Dr. Aurelia H. Bernhardt, President 
of Mills College, California, will be the 
guest of Miss L. V. T. Simmons over 
Saturday and Sunday. Dr. Reinhardt 
is the National President of the Amer- 
ican Association of University Women, 
and served as its delegate at the Inter- 
national Conference in Paris last year. 
She will address the State College 
Branch of the A. A. U. W. on Saturday 
evening of this week. 

. o 

CHAPLAIN'S OFFICE 

Dr. Metzger, college chaplain, has set 
up headquarters in room 282 Old Main 
where he will be glad to welcome fac- 
ulty members as well as students. His 
office hours will be from 8:20 to 10:30 
in the morning and from 1:30 to 3:00 
in the afternoon. 






in r ' n ~ 



..iij ^i9j£ii 



u.j vlt:-lil 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



VOLUME 3 



The Pennsylvania State Coll 




State College, Pa., November 6, 1923 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



NUMBER 9 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



NO CLASSES 

Although Pennsylvania Day is no 
longer observed as an official college oc- 
casion, Saturday of this week will be 
celebrated as a student social and ath- 
letic holiday. There will be no classes 
on Saturday morning. A soccer game 
with the Navy will be played at 10:00, 
while the Georgia Tech football game 
is at 2:30. There will toe a Glee Club 
Concert at 7:30 in the Auditorium. 



GRADUATE FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the Gradu- 
ate Faculty at 4:30 p. m. on Thursday. 
November 8, in the Foyer of the Audi- 
torium. Members of the instructional 
staff having charge of graduate courses 
are included in the membership of the 
Graduate Faculty. A complete list is to 
be found in the Announcement of the 
Graduate School for 1923-24. Individual 
notices will not be sent out. — F. D. Kern, 
dean. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 
Seniors 
Acquarone, Paul, Bot 
Schierer, C. A., CF 
Junior 
Allen, H. G., CF 

Sophomore 
Wise, Ralph W., DH 
Freshmen 

Crumb, Albert L., EE 
Gorman, Frank J., ICh 
Konikowsky, Edward T., ME 
Two-Year Ags 

Rovenolt, Milford L. 
iShadduck, Louis H. 
Special 

Schomaker, Chester F., M1E 



ADVANCED DEGREES 

Faculty members who have received 

! advanced degrees of any kind since 

filling out their personnel records for 

the President's Office are requested to 

j notify that office at once so that the 

j faculty list for the general catalogue 

may be correct. 



ENGINEERING LECTURE 

The engineering lecture to be delivered 
on Friday, November 9, at 4:30, in Old 
Chapel, will be on "Early American In- 
dustry." Professor J. O. Keller, head of 
the department of Industrial Engineer- 
ing, will be the speaker. Faculty mem- 
bers are invited to attend. 



DR. STECKER 

Another valuable faculty member was 
lost to the college last week when it was 
learned that Dr. H. Freeman Stecker, 
for twenty years a member of the Math- 
ematics Department, had passed away 
in a Baltimore Hospital on Tuesday 
morning. Death followed a lingering 
illness of some six months' duration and 
it was known for a long time that his 
condition was hopeless. 

It is said that Dr. Stecker ranked as 
one of the seven greatest mathemati- 
cians in the world, and he was a life 
member of most of the leading mathe- 
matical societies. He was one of two 
local faculty members to have the dis- 
t notion of a star after his name in the 
list of American men of science. For 
many years, he has been a figure in one 
of Penn State's student songs, the line 
"They've gone out from Stecker's Cal- 
culus" being familiar to most everyone. 
Moreover, "Doc" Stecker, as he was 
popularly known, was a familiar figure 
at Penn State's wrestling and boxing- 
meets for many years, serving always 
in the capacity of official time-keeper. 

President Thomas conducted the fun- 
eral services at Dr. Stacker's late home 
on Thursday afternoon and interment 
was made in the Branch Cemetery. 



-o - 



RED CROSS ROLL CALL 

The annual Red Cross Roll Call is 
scheduled to open on Sunday, November 
11, Armistice Day, and the State College 
Chapter is hoping for 100 per cent con- 
tribution this year. A special effort is 
being made to have families take out 
one subscription for the family rather 
than individual subscriptions for each 
member, because fifty cents on each sub- 
scription goes to the national organiza- 
tion of the Red Cross whether the sub- 
scription is for $1.00 or for $5.00. Nat- 
urally, the local chapter profits most by 
the larger contribution. 

A house-to-house canvass will be 
made on Sunday afternoon and faculty 
members are urged to aid with their an- 
nual membership dues. Not only is the 
national work of the Red Cross worthy 
of support, but the services of Mrs. 
Jones, the local Red Cross nurse, are 
proving invaluable to the community. 
&The cost of maintaining this nursing 
service must be met by funds raised in 
the annual Roll Call. 



GEORGIA TECH 

Georgia Tech tickets will be ready for 
distribution to faculty members at the 
Treasurer's Office today, Tuesday, dur- 
ing college hours only. They should be 
procured at this time to avoid confusion. 
No coupons will be accepted at the field 
on the day of the game. The game 
will start at 2:30 and faculty members 
are urged to get to their seats as early 
as possible. 



CALENDAR 

TUESDAY, November G 
Faculty members get Georgia Tech 
tickets, Treasurer's Office. 

WEDNESDAY, November 7 
Association of University Professors, 
7:30, Room 203 Eng. A. 
Spanish Club, 7:30. Old Chapel. 

THURSDAY, November 8 
Graduate Faculty meeting 4:30, Foyer 
of Auditorium. 

FRIDAY, November 9 
Engineering lecture, 4:30, Old Chapel. 

SATURDAY, November 10 
No classes. Fall Holiday. Soccer — 
Penn State vs. Navy, 10:00 New Beaver. 
Football— Penn State vs. Georgia Tech, 
2:30, New Beaver. Glee Club Concert, 
7:30, Auditorium. 

SUNDAY, November 13 
Chapel Speaker — Bishop Edwin H. 
Hughes, D. D., of the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church, Boston, Mass. 



A. A. U. P. 

The Pennsylvania State College Chap- 
ter of the American Association of Uni- 
versity Professors will hold a meeting in 
Room 203 Engineering A, at 7:30 p. m., 
on Wednesday, November 7. Professor 
I. L. Foster will speak of his three 
months in Europe. There will be an im- 
portant business meeting to consider the 
selection of a delegate to the National 
& nvention to be held in Columbus, 
Ohio, November 30 to December 1. Top- 
ics ito be considered at the convention 
will be discussed. — J. Ben Hill, Secre- 
tary. 

CAMPAIGN RECEIPTS 

Campaign receipts for the past week 
were as follows: 

New York City $1270 

Central New York , 1025 

Erie 520 

Centre 505 

New Jersey 325 

Columbia 300 

Cumberland 175 

Lackawanna 150 

Maine 150 

Bradford 100 

Elk 100 

Fayette 100 

Indiana (State) 100 

Philadelphia 30 

Vermont 30 

Cambria 10 

ToAal $4890 

o 

SPANISH CLUB 

The Corculo de les Amigos de la Len- 
gua Espanola will present a vocal and 
musical program on Wednesday even- 
ing, November 7, at 7:30 in the Old 
Chapel. All who are interested are cor- 
dially invited to attend. 



:■ LOG 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State Colle< 

iz 



Contributions must be aa 
brief as possible, and reach 
G, W. Sullivan, Bulletin .Edi- 
tor, 17 5 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 3 



State College, Pa., November 13, 1923 



NUMBER 10 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



COLLEGE SENATE 

The regular meeting of the College 
Senate will take place on Thursday 
evening, .November 15, at 7:30, in the 
Foyer of the Auditorium. 



BELOW GRADES 



Members of the teaching staff should 
note that "below grade" reports for the 
present semeester were duo on Wednes- 
day, November 7. — W. S. Hoffman, Reg- 
istrar. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

There will be a meeting of the fac- 
ulty of the School of Education on 
Tuesday November 13, at 4:30, in room 
121 Old Main. — H. G. Parkinson, secie- 
tary. 



ENGINEERING FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the School 
of Engineering Faculty to consider low 
grades on Monday,, November 19, at 
7:00 p. m„ in Room 200, Engineering 
D. — C. L. Kinsloe, Secretary. 



AGRICULTURAL FACULTY 

The regular meeting of the Agricul- 
tural Faculty and Research Staff has 
been postponed until Thursday, Novem- 
ber 22. — R. L. Watts, Dean. 
o 

COUNTY LIST 

The Registrar has just compiled a 
new County List of students. The 
names are arranged alphabetically ac- 
cording to counties and classes. Mem- 
bers of the Faculty may consult this 
list at any time by calling at the Reg- 
istrar's Office. 

ATTENDS MEETING 

Dean Sackett is attending the Land 
Grant College Association meeting in 
Chicago this week. He will read a 
paper on "English Technical Universi- 
ties", and lead in the discussion of two 
topics. These are: "The University 
and the Engineer" and "The Amount 
and Nature of Shop Work". He will 
also inspect the sewerage treatment 
works in Indianapolis and the testing 
plant of the Chicago Drainage Commis- 
sion. 



LECTURE ON PARIS 

"Paris" will be the subject of an il- 
lustrated lecture by Mr. Albert Robin 
of the Romance Language Department, 
to be given on Wednesday evening, No- 
vember 14, at 8:00 in the Old Chapel. 
Members of the Faculty and their 
friends are cordially invited to attend. 



1924 SUMMER SESSION 

Upon the recommendation of Dean 
W. G. Chambers,, the Council of Ad- 
ministration has taken the following 
action affecting the next Summer Ses- 
sion of the College: 

"1. That for the summer of 192 1. 
the Summer Session be limited to six 
weeks or thirty actual school ■lays. 

"2. That the session open Monday, 
July 7, (with registration beginning 
Saturday, July 5) and close Friday, 
August 15. 

"3. That recitation periods bo length- 
ened so as to permit the giving of 
regular three-credit course. 

"4. That in view of the lengthened 
recitation periods each instructor be 
limited to the teaching of two courses 
(which would amount to fifteen hours 
of teaching per week). 

"5. That students be limited to two 
full courses (six credits) as a standard 
schedule of work." 

Heads of departments which offer 
work in the Summer Session are asked 
to confer with the Dean of the School 
or' Education concerning proposed 
courses, and in recommending instruc- 
tors to adhere strictly to the rule which 
permits an instructor to teach in not 
more than two successive Summer Ses- 
sions. 

o 

RELIGIOUS CENSUS 

A religious census of all students 
under date of October 13, has been pre- 
pared by the Registrar's office. It 
shows a wide distribution of religious 
preferences. Presbyterians, Methodists 
and Lutherans rank first, second and 
third, respectively. The complete list 
follows: 

Presbyterian 753 

Methodist 640 

Lutheran 3G3 

Roman Catholic 2S8 

Reformed 207 

Protestant Episcopal 170 

Baptist 101 

Hebrew 78 

Evangelical 55 

United Presibyterian 4S 

United Brethren _, 37 

Society of Friends 35 

Church of Christ 30 

Congregational 24 

Dunkard 22 

Christian Science 19 

Moravian 6 

Mennonite 4 

Unitarian 4 

Church of God 3 

Universalist 3 

Greek Catholic 2 

Disciple * 

Schwenkfelder 1 

Spiritualist 1 

United Zion Children 1 

No preference indicated 20S 

Total 311u 



CALENDAR 

TUESDAY, November 13 

Education Faculty meeting, 4:30, 
Room 121 Old Main. 

THURSDAY, November 15 

College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of AwX,- 
torium. 

FRIDAY, November lo 

Musicale at University Club, mem- 
bers and partners. 

SATURDAY, November 17 
Football, Penn State Freshmen vs. 
West Virginia Freshmen, 1:00, New 
Beaver. Telegraphic returns, Penn 
State vs. Penn, 2:00, Auditorium. 

Entertainment Course number, 8:00 
Auditorium. 

SUNDAY, November 18 
Chapel Speaker — Dr. Albert J. Alex- 
ander, First Presbyterian Church, Bea- 
ver, Pa. 

MONDAY, November 19 

Engineering Faculty meeting, 7:00, 
Room 200 Engineering D. 



PHI BETA KAPPA 

All new faculty people who are mem- 
bers of Phi Beta Kappa are requested 
to send their names, with college and 
year of membership, at their earliest 
convenience, to Robert E. Dengler, sec- 
retary of the Penn State Association 
of Phi Beta Kappa. He will also be 
glad to have the names of any mem- 
bers of a faculty family who are Phi 
Beta Kappa. His office is in room 313, 
Main Building. 

o 

ENTERTAINMENT COURSE 

The second number of the Y. M. C. A. 

and Department of Music entertain- 
ment course has been arranged for Sat- 
urday evening, Novemberr 17, at 8:00 
in the Auditorium. Eugene Laurant, ;,/ 
magician extraordinary, is to be the at- ' 
traction and he is said to be one of the 
best in the business. For those not 
having course tickets, the admission 
charge will be seventy-five cents. 
o 

CAMPAIGN RECEIPTS 

Campaign receipts for the past week 
were as follows: 

Northern New York $1525 

Chester 208 

Allegheny 100 

Schuylkill 100 

Armstrong 75 

Union 50 

New Jersey 25 

Northampton 25 

Susquehanna 18 

Centre 5 

Total _.'. $2131 



*• H. CROCKETT, 
3 13 Mat v - 



3 LD 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



VOLUME 3 



The Pennsylvania State College 



State College, Pa., November 20, 1923 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



NUMBER 11 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

AGRICULTURAL FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the Agri- 
cultural Faculty on Thursday, Novem- 
ber 22d, at 4:30, in room 103 of the Ag- 
ricultural Building — R. L. Watts, dean. 



-o- 



STUDENTS withdra w 

During the past week the following 
tudents have left college: 
Seniors 
Knox, Miss Eleanor, HE 
Mullins, John P., AE 
Sophomores 
Gibson, Glenn D., Ch 
Murphy, Edwin L., PM 
Ramsey, Harry E., PM 
Watt, Ralph, Mng 

Freshmen 

Church, Prank E„ CE 
Smart, John E., AL 
Sweet, John K., CE 

Special 

Metzger, John, Ag 

POSTPONE DEDICATION 

The dedication of Frederick Watts 
fall, the new dormitory for men, which 
.■us originally scheduled for Friday, 
November 23d, has been indefinitely 
iostponed. 

■ o 

GRADE AVERAGES 

The Registrar has just completed 
veraging grades for the second semes- 
er of last year showing the relative 
itanding of the men and the women, 
he standing of fraternity and non- 
iraternity men, and the standing of 
'club" and non-club women. The fig- 
ires are of interest. 
Vverage grade women students. ..77.087 

Average grade "club" women SO. 471 

Vverage grade non-club women ...75.974 

Vverage grade men students 72.094 

Vverage grade fraternity men 71.078 

Vverage grade non-fraternity men 72.97G 
vverage grade all 4-yr. students ...72.568 
o 

WEATHER FLAGS 

The flying of weather signals on the 
lid Main flag pole has been discontin- 
ied because of the danger encountered 
'•nd also owing to the fact that con- 
siderable time was required for the 
vork. In order to still give weather 
ndications, a flag pole has been erected 
m the cupola of the Agricultural Ex- 
'eriment Station Building, and the reg- 
ilar weather flags will be displayed 
here in the future. 



COLLEGE EXAMINER REPORTS 

The following report on admissions 
with advanced standing this fall has 
just been prepared by Dr. Moore, Act- 
ing College Examiner in the absence 
of Dr. Marquardt : 

During the first semester of the ac- 
ademic year 1923-24, 10G new students 
entered this College with more or loss 
academic credit for advanced standing 
from 57 different schools, colleges and 
universities, as fellows: 

Alfred University, 1; Allegheny Col- 
lege, 3; Bethany, 1; Bloomsburg Nor- 
mal, 1; Bluffton College, 1; Brown, 1; 
Bucknell. 5; Univ. of Buffalo, 1; Car- 
negie Tech., 3; Colorado College, 1; 
Colorado School of Mines, 1; Columbia, 
2; Cumberland Vally Normal, 1; Uni- 
versity of Delaware, 3; University of 
Detroit, 1; Dickinson, 2; East Strouds- 
burg Normal, 1; Edinboro Normal, 2; 
Elizabethtown College, 1; University 
of Florida, 1; Franklin & Marshall, 2; 
Gettysburg, 1; Grove City, 3; Hobart, 
1; Hood College, 1; Juniata, 4; Key- 
stone State Normal, 1; Lafayette, 1; 
Lebanon Valley, 1; Lincoln University, 
1; Messiah Bible School JuniorCollege, 
1; Michigan Agricultural College, 1; 
Michigan College of Mines, 2; Millers- 
ville Normal, 3; Missouri University, 
1; Moravian College, 2; Mount Saint 
Marys College, 2; Mount Union Col- 
lege, 2; Muhlenberg, 3; College of City 
of New York, 1; Pennsylvania College 
for Women, 2; State Summer Sessions, 
7 ; Pennsylvania State Forest Acad- 
emy, 1; University of Pennsylvania, 
5; University of Pittsburgh, 9; Poto- 
mac State School, 1; Saint John Kanty 
College, 2; Slippery Rock Normal, 2; 
Southwestern State Normal, 1; Susque- 
hanna University, 1; Swarthmore, 1; 
Temple University, 1; Trinity College, 
1 ; Tufts College, 1 ; Ursirms, 1 ; Way- 
nesburg College, 2; University of Wis- 
consin, 1. 

These 100 students who entered with 
advanced standing were classified as 
follows: Seniors, 4; Juniors, 22; 
Sophomores, 55; Freshmen, 25. 

They entered the various schools as 
follows: Liberal Arts, 35; Education, 
34; Engineering, 13; Natural Science, 
11; Agriculture, 10; Mines, 3. 



CALENDAR 




ATTEND COAL CONFERENCE 

Dean Holbrook and Professor Chedsey 
of the School of Mines were delegates 
to the coal conference held by the 
American Academy of Political and So- 
cial Science at Philadelphia last week. 
About thirty papers were presented by 
representatives of the various points of 
view in the industry. Dean Holbrook 
addressed the conference on the sub- 
ject "The World's Present Fuel Re- 
sources". 



Agricultural faculty, room 10 



4:30. 

Venn .State Players, Auditorium, S:15. 

FRIDAY, November 23 

Ladies Night at University Club. 

SUNDAY, November 25 
Chapel Speaker — Dr. Frazer Metzger. 
College Chaplain. 

PE3N STATE PLAYERS 
The Penn State Players will revive 
T. W. Robertson's famous comedy, 
'Caste", on Thursday evening of this 
week, at 8:15, in the Auditorium. 
"Caste" is a good example of the arti- 
ficial comedies which were popular dur- 
ing the latter part of the nineteenth 
century. Since its New York premiere 
in L8G7 the play has been a. popular one 
foi ock companies. 

Tickets will be on sale at the State 
Shirt Shop tonight, Tuesday, from 
7:00 to S:00. Prices arc fifty and 
thirty-five cents. 

. o 

UNIVERSITY CLUB 

Ladies Night is scheduled for Friday 
night of this week at the University 
Club. Patronesses will be Mrs. E. B. 
Foi'bes, Mrs. D. C. Duncan, and Mrs. 
W. G. Chambers. Reservations for din- 
ner must lie made with Mr. Clayton not 
later than Wednesday noon, November 
21st. Saturday night will be club night. 

o 

CAMPA !G X RECEIPTS 

Campaign receipts for the past week 
were as follows: 

Blair $1461 

Dauphin 500 

Connecticut 300 

Alabama 100 

Northampton 100 

Bradford 55 

Allegheny 50 

Philadelphia 25 

Somerset 15 

York 5 

Total $2611 

o — 

PITT TICKETS 

Tickets for the Thanksgiving game 
with Pitt may be secured by faculty 
members in the same fashion as for 
the other games this season. Applica- 
tion blanks were distributed from the 
Athletic Association Office yesterday 
and may still be obtained today. The 
limit is two tickets, and the cost $2.50 
each. 



*»!>. CROCKETT, 

3 13 hi A I n eina. 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 



VOLUME 3 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

THANKSGIVING 

Classes will be suspended on Thurs- 
day of this week, Thanksgiving Day, 
which is listed in the college calendar 
as an official holiday. Classes will re- 
sume at the first hour on Friday 
morning. 

REGARDING ABSENCES 

There will be no fine levied for ab- 
sence before or after Thanksgiving 
Day. Absence at this time, however, 
will not be excused except for reasons 
which would form legitimate excuses 
at any other time. — A. R. Warnock, 
Dean of Men. 



SABBATICAL LEAVE 

In an early issue of the Faculty Bul- 
letin, mention was made of action by 
the Board of Trustees regarding leaves 
of absence and Sabbatical, Leave. Reg • 
ulations governing the former were 
given, but the action with respect to 
the latter was inadvertently omitted. It 
is as follows: 

Sabbatical Leave, for purposes of 
study, travel or research, on full pay 
for one-half year or on half -pay for a 
full year, to be granted by the Trus- 
tees on recommendation by the Dean 
and the approval of the President to 
those members of the Faculty of full 
Professional rank, who have served thee 
College efficiently for six years. In the 
case of administrative officers the 
leave is to be granted on recommenda- 
tion by the President for efficient 
service for six years, the pay to be on 
the same basis as above indicated. 

It is further recommended that these 
regulations go into effect at once and 
to whatever extent the budget will per- 
mit. 



CATALOGUE MATERIAL 

Copy for the 1923-24 General Cata- 
logue has been sent to the offices ot tne 
various deans for revision and correc- 
tion. Heads of departments should 
make sure that all errors in last year's 
catalogue, both typographical and oth- 
erwise, are corrected on this year's 
copy. 



CHAPEL SEATS 

The first two rows of seats on the 
right side of the Auditorium in the 
future will be reserved for members of 
the faculty who desire to attend daily 
chapel exercises. These will take the 
place of the seats on the platform here- 
tofore reserved for the faculty. This 
arrangement does not hold good fox- 
Sunday chapel, however. 



Contributions must be aa 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



State College, Pa., November 27, 1923 



NUMBER 12 



VISIT OTHER COLLEGES 

Following the annual meeting of the 
Land Grant College Association in 
Chicago on November 14-1G, President 
Thomas and R. H. Smith, college comp- 
troller, visited Iowa State College, the 
University of Wisconsin and the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota. Mr. Smith also 
stopped at Northwestern and Purdue 
Universities. 

Alumni Homecoming was being cele- 
brated at Iowa State at the time of their 
visit to that institution, and President 
Thomas made an address at the con- 
vocation. He made three other talks 
there, two of them to groups of Penn 
Staters. 

"All of these institutions showed the 
effect of greater state financial support 
than Penn State has received," Presi- 
dent Thomas said upon his return last 
/Thursday. "But not one of them 
could give us new ideas with respect to 
business administration; in comparison, 
our system here is unsurpassed, I be- 
l;eve, and we can feel ourselves fortu- 
nate indeed. 

"The spirit and loyalty of the stu- 
dents at Penn State is far above what 
we saw in these other and larger insti- 
tutions. It made us feel good to get 
back to Penn State." 

One of the most striking compari- 
sons, according to President Thomas, 
was the lack of farm land immediately 
adjacent to the agricultural school at 
each of the western institutions, this 
being especially true at Iowa State. In 
this respect, it is said that Penn State 
has the best located farm land and ex- 
perimental plots of any state college or 
university in the country. 

An item of more than ordinary in- 
terest that developed at the Land 
Grant College meeting was the laying 
of plans for the support of the propos- 
ed Purnell Bill that is to be introduced 
in the next Congress. This bill would 
provide Federal funds for the support 
of agricultural experiment station work 
in every state. A gradually increasing 
scale is proposed until a certain fixed 
annual appropriation of $85,000 is 
reached in seven years' time. The fund 
would start at $15,000 a year. 

o 

CAMPAIGN RECEIPTS 

Campaign receipts for the past week 
were as follows: 

Blair $3085 

Michigan 2000 

Delaware (County) 500 

Berks 300 

Ohio 225 

Philadelphia 225 

Massachusetts 150 

Westmoreland 100 

Cambria 38 

Indiana (County) 24 

Total- $6647 



CALENDAR 



THURSDAY, November 29 

Thanksgiving Day holiday. 
Telegraph returns, Penn State vs. 
Pitt, Auditorium, 2:00. 

SATURDAY, December 1 

Club night at University Club. Vaude- 
ville entertainment for members only. 

SUNDAY, December 2 

Chapel Speaker — Colonel John T. 
Axton, Chief of Chaplains, Washington, 
D. C. 

ATTEND MEETINGS 

Miss Edith P. Chace, head of the de- 
partment of home economics, attended 
the recent meeting of the Land Grant 
College Association in Chicago, where 
she discussed "Organization Problems 
in Home Economics Administration'' 
before the home economics section. 
Miss Chace was also chairman of a 
committee that was asked to make a 
report of a college health program. 
'.Miss Sarah M. Wilson, of the home 
economics department, attended the 
meeting of the Mountain Arts Associa- 
tion at Lock Haven and discussed the 
teacher training problem. 



o- 



LOST OPPORTUNITIES 

The Faculty Bulletin reaches every 
member of the faculty and is there- 
fore one of the best advertising medi- 
ums on the campus. Yet dramatic, 
musical and other organizations con- 
tinually fail to provide the editor with 
aovance information on their produc- 
tions, or with announcements concern- 
ing ticket sales, etc. In nearly every 
case where such an announcement ap- 
pears, it is because the editor took it 
upon himself to look up the informa- 
tion. 

Unfortunately the editor has other 
things to do in addition to putting out 
the Bulletin, so that time is not avail- 
able to gather bit by bit the information 
that should be eagerly volunteered. 
The Bulletin is open to the faculty for 
announcements concerning lectures and 
meetings. Golden opportunities to ad- 
vertise these affairs are being over- 
looked by those concerned. 



ENTRANCE EXAMS 

General entrance examinations will 
be offered at the opening of the second 
semester this year, for the first time 
in the history of the college, in order to 
accommodate those taking advantage of 
the admission of the 100 Replacement 
Freshmen. , 



"•^•CROCKETT. 
3 13 f,' a I •■ D » ^ 



-Ifi !! / , 1 I 



;«{;;, ,,' is^ J : "3_.;^ £" ' 






:■ ...,'- ,i,. i 



i i i i- 



• 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of Interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



VOLUME 3 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



State College, Pa., December 4, 1923 



NUMBER 13 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

COLLEGE SENATE 

Because of the Christmas holidays, 
the December meeting of the College 
Senate has been advanced to Thursday, 
December 13, at 7:30 in the Foyer of 
the Auditorium. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

There will be a meeting of the faculty 
of the School of Education on Monday, 
December 10, at 4:30, in Room 121 Old 
Main. — H. G. Parkinson, secretary. 



THE DIRECTORY 



A copy of the Student and Faculty 
Directory has been placed in the hands 
of all members of the faculty. The 
Registrar requests that corrections of 
iny kind be reported to him in writing 
n order that he may prepare copy for 
he general catalogue. 

o 

STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
tudents have left College: 

Freslimeu 

Gerhard, Lewis H., CE 
Jones, Herbert P., ME 
Oursler, John |T., ME 
Weaver, Robert C, ME 

Sophomores 

Brown, James E., ChA 
Moore, Samuel A., CF 
Wetzel Merle M., EE 

Junior 
Means, Robert H., Hort 

Special 
Darlington, Miss Edith, VHE 



MID-YEAR GRADUATES 

More than 90 seniors are listed as 
andidates for degrees at the mid-year 
invocation according to the records of 
the Registrar's office. The School of 
(Mines is the only school without rep- 
resentation in the mid-year class, while 
(the recently created School of Educa- 
;tion will graduate its tlrst quota of 
[students. 

Of those listed as eligible for mid- 
year graduation, 40 are in the School 
bf Engineering; 23 in the School of 
"-aberal Arts; 13 in the School of Ag- 
riculture; 8 in the School of Educa- 
tion; and 5 in the School of Natural 
|;cience. 

i Practically half of those who will re- 
ceive diplomas in January are not in 
[Ollege this semester, but completed 
heir work at the last Summer Ses- 
ion. Approximately 70 degrees were 
onferred at the mid-year exercises 
ist year. 



PENN STATE EE ACHES 

23,000 IN ONE YEAR 

Actual educational instruction was 
received by almost twenty-three thou- 
sand people from the Pennsylvania State 
College during the 1922-1923 collegiate 
year, according to statistics just an- 
nounced toy President John M. Thomas 
for inclusion in his annual report which 
is to be published soon. 

The college, as a state institution, re- 
gards the entire state of Pennsylvania 
as its "campus," and at least 20,000 
Pennsylvanians benefitted through resi- 
dent, extension class or correspondence 
study supervised by the college officials. 
The total number enrolled as resident 
and extra-mural students was 22,733, a 
i coord heretofore unsurpassed in the 
sixty-eight years ot Peun State's ex- 
istence. 

During the year there were 112 can- 
didates for advanced degrees; 3,241 stu- 
dents in tour year resident courses; and 
2,946 resident students in non-degree 
conferring courses, such as Summer 
tiession, two-year and winter agricul- 
tural courses. Almost 6,000 attended 
courses at the college. On the "state- 
wide campus" 414 were in teacher train- 
ing classes, in trades and industries; 
8,021 were in educational, engineering 
and mining extension courses, and 8,- 
4-iis were enrolled in the various agri- 
cultural, educational, engineering and 
home economics correspondence cours- 
es. There is every indication that the 
present year's record will exceed these 
figures. 



CALENDAR 



PHI KAPPA PHI 



Phi Kappa Phi initiation will be held 
Friday evening, December 7, at 6:00 
o'clock, in the basement of the Uni- 
versity Club. A dinner will follow the 
meeting after which there will be 
speeches by Dean Stoddart and Presi- 
dent Ira A. Hollis of Worcester Poly- 
technic Institute. Reservations for din- 
ner should be made at once with the 
secretary. Notices of the meeting have 
been sent to all members, if there are 
any members who have not received 
the notice please notify the secretary, 
Dr. 1. D. Foster, at once. 



FRENCH CLUB 

Le Salon de Mariane, the new 
French Club, will hold its first program 
on Thursday evening of this week at 
7:30 in the Old Chapel. An illustrated 
lecture on the World War will be de- 
livered by Mr. Albert Robin, and there 
will also be a musical program. An 
admission charge of twenty- five cents 
will be made, and seats may be re- 
served at the Romance Language of- 
fice, 120 Old Main. 



THURSDAY, December 6 

French Club, 7:30, Old Chapel. 
SATURDAY, December 8 

Soccer, Penn State vs. Lehigh, New 
Leaver. 

Club Night at University Club. 
SUNDAY, December 9 

There will be no chapel speaker. A 
musical program will be rendered. 



MAY BE 01 INTEREST 

Professor E. D. Walker has just re- 
ceived the following communication 
from the War Department which may 
be of interest to some members of the 
faculty who were in military service: 

"Recently the Comptroller General 
rendered a decision to the effect that 
those who were enlisted men of the 
Army of the United States (Regular 
Army, National Guard, and National 
Army; and attended the Officers' Train- 
ing Camp between the dates of July 
15, 1917, and June 30, 1918, are entitled 
to now receive the difference between 
their pay as enlisted men and $100 per 
month. Those who attended training 
camp after June 30, 1918, are not en- 
titled to this pay." 

Professor Walker will be glad to give 
additional information to any who may 
be interesete. 

o 

STUDENTS MAKE PREXY'S TIES 

President John M. Thomas, of the 
Pennsylvania State College, is wearing 
neckties that were made by students 
in the textile division of the State Col- 
lege engineering extension school at 
Allentown. The patterns for the de- 
sign of the material used in two ties 
he received last week were projected 
toy the twenty textile students who 
then wove the silk cloth from which 
the ties were made especially for Pres- 
ident Thomas. They were presented to 
the college executive by the class through 
John Allen, chairman of the Allentown 
committee in charge of the class in- 
struction. 

— o 

CAMPAIGN RECEIPTS 

Campaign receipts for the past week 
were as follows : 

Montgomery $6000 

Blair 417 

Allegheny 250 

New York HO 

Fayette 101 

Dauphin 100 

Illinois 50 

Susquehanna 50 

Maryland 30 

Washington (county) 25 

Schuylkill 20 

Total $7153 



w R ^ C K r * 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building-, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 3 



State College, Pa., December 11, 1923 



NUMBER 14 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

COLLEGE SENATE 

The December meeting of the Col- 
lege Senate will take place on Thurs- 
day evening of this week at 7:30 in 
the Foyer of the Auditorium. 



AGRICULTURAL FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the fac- 
ulty of the School of Agriculture on 
Thursday, December 13th, at 4:30 in 
room 103 of the Agricultural Building. 
— R. L. Watts, dean. 



LIBERAL ARTS FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the fac- 
ulty of the School of Liberal Arts on 
Wednesday, December 12th, at 4:30, 
in room 25 of the Liberal Arts Build- 
ing. — L. V. T. Simmons, secretary. 



INSPECTION TRIP 

The attention of all instructors con- 
cerned is called to the fact that offi- 
cial permission was granted to mem- 
bers of the student branch of the 
American Society of Mechanical En- 
gineers to go on an inspection trip 
to the new power plant at Saxton last 
Friday, December 7th. This permis- 
sion applied to senior and junior mech- 
anicals who were members of the soc- 
iety. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 

Junior 

Beard, George E., PM 
Sophomores 

Dechert, Oliver L., Hort 
Donley, Earl H., AE 
Hanna, Mark N., Ag 
Thompson, John L, CE 

Freshmen 

Faunce, David, IE 
McFeaters, D. Wade, Arch 
Thomas, William C, PM 



REGARDING ABSENCES 

The five dollar fine will be in ef- 
fect as to unexcused absences immed- 
iately before or after the Christmas 
vacation which begins on Friday at 
5:20 p. m. and extends to Thursday, 
January 3rd, at 8:00 a. m. Practic- 
ally no excuses will be issued for ab- 
sence at this time, except, of course, 
for serious illness. Instructors in 
practicum, laboratory and similar 
classes can help maintain an attitude 



of respect for this rule by announcing 
that these classes, as well as all other 
classes, will be conducted as usual. 

Whenever any students, even a very 
few, are excused early, the fact soon 
becomes known and all other students 
rush to the deans and instructors to 
argue for similar concessions. 

Students who are absent without 
leave on the last day before and the 
first day after the vacation should be 
barred from further class attendance 
until a permit to re-enter classes is 
shown to the instructor. — A. R. War- 
nock, Dean of Men. 



CALENDAR 



MERRY CHRISTMAS 

This being the final issue until after 
the holidays, the "Faculty Bulletin" de- 
sires to extend to every member of the 
Faculty most cordial good wishes for 
a right Merry Christmas and a Happy 
and Prosperous New Year. May the 
festive board groan with good things 
on Christmas Day and thus crowd out 
of mind contemplation of the many 
bills that will come in natural cours2 
with New Year's Day. 

For 1924, we will resolve to make 
the Bulletin a little newsier, a bit 
more informative; but to do so we 
must ask once more for the help and 
cooperation of every faculty member 
in the matter of contributions. The 
next issue of the Bulletin will be un- 
der date of January 8, 1924. 



JUDGE LINDSEY TO SPEAK 

The third number of the Y. M. C. A.. 
and Department of Music entertain- 
ment course will take place in the 
Auditorium tomorrow (Wednesday) 
evening at 8:15. Judge Ben B. Lind- 
sey, famous juvenile court jurist of 
Denver, will be the speaker and his 
subject will be "Why Boys Lie". Sin- 
gle admission tickets cost seventy- 
five cents, or regular course tickets 
may be secured at a twenty per cent 
reduction from the initial cost. Tick- 
ets are on sale during college hours 
at the Y. M. C. A. Hut. 



CAMPAIGN RECEIPTS 

Campaign receipts for the past week 
were as follows: 

Montgomery — $1500 

Allegheny H40 

Philadelphia - 250 

Erie 205 

Crawford - 100 

Lebanon 91 

Connecticut 50 

Lackawanna 36 

Elk 3 



WEDNESDAY, December 12 

Liberal Arts Faculty, 4:30, 25 L. 



A. 



Judge Lindsey speaks, 8:15, Auditor- 
ium. 

THURSDAY, December 13 

Agricultural Faculty, 4:30, 103 Ag. 

College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Audi- 
torium. 

Basketball, Penn State vs. Juniata, 
7:00, Armory. 

Christmas Party at University Club. 

FRIDAY, December 14 

Christmas vacation begins, 5:20 p. m. 
MONDAY, December 31 

Watch-Party at University Club, 8:30. 
Members and partners. 

THURSDAY, January 3 
Christmas vacation ends, 8:00 a. m. 
SATURDAY, January 5 

Basketball, Penn State vs. Susque- 
hanna, 7:00, Armory. 

Penn State Players, 8:00, Auditor- 
ium. 

UNIVERSITY CLUB 

The Christmas Party at the Univ- 
ersity Club on Thursday of this week 
will be in the nature of an all-family, 
pre-holiday celebration. The Kiddies' 
party will run from 4:30 to 8:00, and 
junior members and adults from 8:00 
to 12:00. A committee will look after 
the kiddies so it will not be necessary 
tor parents to remain with them un- 
less they wish to do so. However, par- 
ents should call for their children at 
eight o'clock. A ten o'clock plate sup- 
per will replace the usual six o'clock 
course dinner. 

Members should make reservations 
for both the plate supper and the 
kiddies' supper with Mr. Clayton not 
later than noon today (Tuesday). 



Total $3375 



PENN STATE PLAYERS 

The Penn State Players will pre- 
sent three one-act plays in the Audi- 
torium on Saturday evening, January 
5th. Members of the faculty desiring 
tickets are urged to send their appli- 
cation with a stamped, addressed en- 
velope to Mr. D. D. Mason, University 
Club. Tickets are free; a collection 
will be taken to defray expenses. 

— , o 

ATTEND MEETING 

Miss Sarah M. Wilson and Miss 
Louise G. Turner, of the Department 
of Home Economics, attended the 
meeting of the National Society for 
Vocational Education which was held 
in Buffalo last week. 



13 U A I N ELDG. 



*"> S** *-s *-!. 



published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 



VOLUME 3 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor. 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



State College, Pa., January 7, 1924 



NUMBER 15 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

XEW ANNUAL REPORT 

The annual report of the College for 
1922-1923 which has been compiled for 
the information of our constituency on 
somewhat different lines from former 
reports, is now in the hands of the 
printer. 

This report has been prepared with 
a view to present faithfully the pre- 
sent condition of the College, and to 
describe the work of the institution in 
its various schools and departments. A 
financial statement of the operation 
of the institution for the year ending- 
June 30, 1923, is included. 

Twenty thousand copies of this re- 
port will be printed as a number of 
"The Pennsylvania State College Bul- 
letin". A copy will be sent to each 
alumnus of the College. I am must 
anxious to place the remaining 14,000 
copies where they will do the most 
i good in the hands of representative 
Pennsylvanians, who are leaders in 
1 educational work, professional life, 
business activities and industrial en- 
terprises, and who are interested or 
ought to be interested in the education- 
al service and the adequate develop- 
ment of their State College. 

It is, I believe, well worth while for 
the College to prepare such a "con- 
stituents' list", and I should be very 
grateful to any members of our staff 
who will send me the names and ad- 
dresses of prominent and influential 
citizens of Pennsylvania (men or 
women), to whom we can, from time 
to time, send a copy of our annual re- 
port or any similar publication. 

JOHN M. THOMAS 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 

Senior 
Call, John S., LA 

Juniors 
Bossier, James, CE 
Hitchcock, Magdalene, VHE 

Sophomore 

Housman, Walter W., ME 
Freshmen 

Clifford, Wesley M., EE 
Turner, Wayne E., PM 



FINAL EXAMINATIONS 

On Saturday, January 19, at 12:10 
p. m., recitation and practicum for the 
first semester will end. Final exami- 
nations for all students will toe given 
beginning Monday, January 21, at 8:00 
a. m. and ending Saturday, January 
26, at 4:00 p. m. 



Any student having two examina- 
tions scheduled at the same time is 
required to report the fact in person 
at the Registrar's office, mi a special 
form there provided. To receive ad- 
justment such conflicts must be report- 
ed not later than noon on Saturday. 
January 12. 

Examinations by appointment will 
be scheduled during the week of Jan- 
uary 14, by the instructor concerned. 
Examinations as scheduled may not 
be changed without the permission of 
the Registrar.— W. S. Hoffman, Regis- 
trar. 

TRAVEL EXPESSE 

Instructions have been received from 
the Auditor General of the Common- 
wealth that hereafter all traveling ex- 
pense charged against State appropria- 
tions must be accompanied by receipts 
for all items except transportation and 
meals. Also that expense for Pullman 
for a distance of less than ninety miles 
will not be approved; and when used, 
Pullman check must accompany the 
expense account. In order that there 
may lie no confusion this practice 
should be made to apply to- all travel 
expenses regardless of whether from 
S'tate funds or not. — R.H.Smith. Comp- 
troller. 



GRADUATE COURSES 

The Department of Chemical Agri- 
culture will offer the following courses 
for graduates during the second se- 
mester: 

Chem. Agr. 17. 37, 38, 500, 501, 502, 
503. 

HAVE YOU A RADIO TALK J 

The radio broadcasting station re- 
opened last night. Programs will be 
given each Monday, Wednesday and 
Friday night at 8:00 until Commen e- 
ment. D. M. Cressw T ell, Director o; 
Public Information, has charge of 
making up programs. Last year he 
received a few responses from a far 
ulty questionnaire on subjects for rad- 
io talks. These suggestions are < n- 
■tirely inadequate to make up programs 
for the balance of the year. He, there- 
fore, requests that all faculty mem- 
bers or administrative officers who feel 
that they have a message to put "on 
the air" from the local station, com- 
municate with him at once. 



SPANISH CLUB 

The Circulo de los Amigos de la Lcn- 
gua Espanola will present a varied 
musical program on Wednesday even- 
ing, January 9, at 7:30 in Old Chapel. 
All interested in Spanish life are cor- 
dially invited to attend. 



CALENDAR 

TUESDAY, January 8 
Liberal Arts Lecture, President 
Thomas, Old Chapel. 7:00. 

WEDNESDAY, January 3 

Spanish Club, 7:30, Old Chapel. 
FRIDAY, January 11 

I'enn State Players at University 
Club. 

SATURDAY, January 12 

Basketball, Penn State vs. Carnegie 
Tech, Armory, 7:00. 

SUNDAY, January 13 

Chapel Speaker — Dr. Frazer Metz- 
ger. 

CAMPAIGN VOTES 

During the present week an effort 
will be made to secure a campaign 
pledge from every new student and 
from every new member of the fac- 
ulty. Don V. Bauder is in charge of 
the canvass of the thousand men stu- 
dents, and Miss Alverna Burdick. of 
the 119 women students. Dr. S. W. 
"Fletcher will supervise the campaign 
among the 71 new faculty members 
who have not yet contributed. 

Next week there will be a team of 
four or five campaigners at work in 
Erie county, and for the week or two 
after that a similar campaign is being 
planned among the two hundred or 
more alumni in New York City who 
have not yet made their contribution. 
There has been but little campaign 
activity during the vacation. Since 
the last issue of the Bulletin, receipts 
have been as follows: 

Lebanon - --- $7S5 

Alleghenv .. _ 760 

V}rle - - - 434 

Oarfield 200 

r>- '-■-.- - ■■ 200 

-. ■ ■, 150 

Bradford .. ... 100 

Faeultv — 60 

60 

: i i LSI r 50 

50 

Juni tta - 50 

Miscellaneous 186 



Total 



$3285 



FREE LECTURE COURSE 

The annual series of Liberal Arts 
lectures will start this evening, with 
President Thomas as the speaker. His 
subject will be "The Argument for 
Penn State". The lectures will be on 
(Tuesday evenings, at 7:00, in the Old 
Chapel. Next week's lecture will be 
by Dr. Sparks on "The Development 
of American Transportation". 



W . P . C R C K E T T , 



1 3 U A I N BLDG. 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsyl 



isylvania State College 



Ooniributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 3 



State College, Pa., January 15, 1924 



NUMBER 16 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



COLLEGE SENATE 

The regular meeting of the College 
Senate will take place at 7:30 on Thurs- 
day evening, January 17, in the Foyer 
of the Auditorium. 



AGRICULTURAL FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the faculty 
of the School of Agriculture on Tues- 
day, January 15, at 3:30, in Room 103 
Ag.— R. L. [Watts, Dean. 

o — 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the faculty 
of the Graduate School this afternoon 
(Tuesday) at 4:30, in the Foyer of the 
Auditorium. — F. D. Kern, Dean. 

o 

MID-YEAR GRADUATE'S 

The attention of all instructors is 
called to the following list of Seniors 
who expect to finish their course and 
get their degree at the approaching Mid- 
year Convocation. 

The grades of these iSeniors should be 
reported on a separate sheet marked 
"Mid- Year Graduates" in order that 
they mey be recorded at once, without 
being sorted out from a multitude of 
grade sheets belonging to other stu- 
dents. 

No grades of mid-year graduates 
should reach the Registrar's office later 
than 9:00 a. m., Saturday, January 26. 
Anderson, H. O. Hunter, A. E. 
Ayers, T. T. Hunter, L. C. 

Barber, G. R. Konegen, W. 

Bedenk, F. J. Lafferty, H. D. 

Bender, R. E. Lederer, H. G. 

Benze, T. W_. Lanks, H. C. 

Billings, Miss J. L. Ljghtner, G. H. 
Bezilla, E. G. McCandless, L. N. 

Boyle, J. A. MoMahan, J. S. 

Carr, D. M. McMullen, F. C. 

dinger, G. C. McWilliams, J. W. 

Cook, C. H. Miller, D. B. 

Corbin, C. R. Miller, J. F. 

Crum, D. L. O'Donnell, F. F. 

Cummings, J. F. p ar k, Miss M. J. 
Davies, W. E. Paul, F. O 

Davis, H. E. Rear'ick', W. S. 

Day, C. R. r 0SSj C . H. 

Doty, J. R. Rudolph, H. R. 

Dreibelbis, F. R. Schlosser, H. E. 
Edmiston, R. W. Simmons, C. S. 
Elder, R. T. Sterner, L. M. 

Giddings, F. B. Thomas, H. L. 

Hamimell, R. H. Toy, S. P. 
Hansen, N. A. Vog'el, J. H. 

Heckman, F. J. Wiliaimson, R. F. 

Horner, W. M. Wolf, F. W. 

Worthington, Miss S. 

REGISTRATION DAYS 

Registration days for the second se- 
mester for all old students are Wednes- 
day, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday 
Until noon, of this week. For new stu- 
dents the days are January 25 and 26. 



CAMPAIGN RECEIPTS 

Campaign receipts for the past week 

were as follows: 

Athletic Association $110,000 

New men students (To Friday 

night) 64,100 

New women students (To Fri- 
day night) 2,17;. 

Other sources 517 

Total $176,792 

No report can be made of the cam- 
paign among new members of the fac- 
ulty. Both the student and the faculty 
campaign, it is hoped, will be finished 
this week; and next week final figures 
can be given for each, with an up-to- 
date total for the whole campaign fund. 

STUDENTS CHANGE SCHOOLS 

The Registrar's office has compiled 
information concerning changes in 
courses according to schools at the 
beginning of the first semester this 
fall. There were 108 such changes, 
Liberal Arts leading in gains and En- 
gineering losing the most. In tabular 
form these changes are as follows: 

To From 

Agriculture — -.. 11 IS 

Education — - 16 9 

Engineering 6 34 

Liberal Arts — 43 14 

Mines 4 10 

Natural Science 8 14 

Probation Section 20 9 

Total - - - 108 108 

The following four students have 
changed their courses and have in- 
curred entrance conditions as indi- 
cated. Until these deficiencies are re- 
moved these students will receive s un- 
der the college regulation, freshman 
classification: 

J. F. Haumesser, 1 unit in Language. 
R. T. Hamilton, 2 units in Language. 
E. H. McCann, 2 units in Language. 
C. D. Blair, 1 unit in Mathematics. 



MISS GIBBONS HONORED 

Miss Rebckah M. Gibbons, daughter 
of Professor W. F. Gibbons, of the 
English department, has been appoint- 
ed director of nutrition for the south- 
ern division of the American Red 
Cross. She will be in charge of nutri- 
tion work in seven states and will 
have headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia. 
Miss Gibbons was formerly a member 
of the chemistry department at Penn 
State, and she received her master's 
degree here in nutrition work under 
the late Dr. Armsby. She has been 
at the University of Chicago for the 
past two years and has practically 
completed her work for the doctorate 
degree. 



CALENDAR 

TUESDAY, January 15 

Agricultural faculty meeting, 3:30, 
Room 103 Ag. 

Graduate faculty meeting, 4:30, Foyer 
of Auditorium. 

Liberal Arts Lecture, Dr. Sparks, 
"The Development of American Trans- 
portation", Old Chapel, 7:00. 

Association of University Professors 
meeting, Room 203 Erg. A., 8:00. 
WEDNESDAY, January Id 

Lecture on the "Riviera", by Mr. 
Albert Robin, 7:30, Old Chapel. 
TKIRSDAY, January 17 

College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Audi- 
torium. 

SATURDAY, January 19 

Basketball, Penn State vs. Gettysburg, 
Armory, 7:00. 

Y. M. iC. A. Course concert, Pablo 
Casals, cellist, Auditorium, 8:00. 
SUNDAY, January 20 

Chapel Speaker — Dr. Robert Bagnell, 
of Grace Methodist Episcopal Church, 
Harrisburg. 

MID -YEAR FRESHMEN 

Many first-class high schools wil 
be graduating a few seniors late in 
January or at the beginning of Feb- 
ruary. The opportunity for them to 
continue their education at that time 
instead of waiting until the following 
September is a new one and is little 
known throughout the state. The col- 
lege wishes to secure desirable appli- 
cants for admission to the replace- 
ment class of one hundred freshmen 
to be admitted at the opening of the 
second semester. Application blanks 
will be mailed from the office of the 
Registrar promptly upon receipt of 
requests. 

Faculty members who know persons 
about to be graduated from high 
school can secure from the Registrar 
information as to the method of ob- 
taining admission. 



YOTE ON PEACE PLAN 

Every member of the faculty will be 
afforded an opportunity during the week 
of January 14 to express his or her 
opinion on the peace plan recently 
awarded the Bok Prize of $100,000. 

It is requested that each member of 
the faculty mark, sign, and attach the 
ballot appended to the copy of the plan 
which he will receive, and leave the 
ballot in his office for collection. 



NO LECTURE NEXT WEEK 

The next lecture in the Liberal Arts 
series is scheduled for February 5, with 
Dr. E. W. Runkle as the speaker. Dr. 
Sparks will speak tonight. 



W.r>. CROCKETT. 



3 13 MAIN 



3 LP 



B L. I ' «* • 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State Coll 



eC^e Contributions must be as 

£5> brief as possible, and reach 

G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 3 



State College, Pa., January 22, 1924 



NUMBER 17 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



GRADE REPORTS 

At a recent meeting of the Council 
of Administration held on January 14, 
the following action was taken : 

"All grade reports at the end of any 
semester are due at the offices of the 
cleans and of the Registrar one week 
after the date of the examination; or, 
in case there is no examination, one 
Teek after the last meeting of the 
class. All delinquent instructors are 
to be reported to the dean concerned." — 
W. S. Hoffman, secretary. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 

Junior 
Burgener, Glen, MG 

Sophomores 
Clark, Robert J., E-E 
Hawley, Oliver, OF 
Noll, Austin L., EE 

Freshmen 
Burner, Paul M., CF 
Munhall, Albert C, PL 
JNaylor, Albert E., PM 

Two-Year Ag' 
(MoConnell, Archie S. 

CAMPAIGN RECEIPTS 

Campaign contributions during the 
past week were as follows: 

New men students $5,375 

New women students 815 

New faculty members 725 

Erie 2,173 

Elk 500 

McKean 400 

Warren 150 

Berks 100 

Butler 100 

Michigan 100 

Bucks 82 

Lancaster 75 

Allegheny 74 

Massachusetts 45 

Northampton Club (benefit)— 30 

Connecticut 30 

Clearfield 20 

Northampton 10 

Northumberland 10 



Total - - $10,814 

The total returns from the recent 
campaign work at State College up to 
Saturday noon were as follows: 

New men students $69,475 

New women students 3,090 

New faculty members 725 

The local campaign is not yet com- 
pleted. For the present, activity in the 
student campaign has been slackened 
3n account of impending examinations. 
The up-to-date campaign total is ap- 
proximately $1,570,000. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT 

At the December meeting of the ex- 
ecutive committee of the Board of 
Trustees, the following minute was 
drawn up: 

"The Trustees desire to place on rec- 
ord their sense of great loss in the 
■death of Professor Joseph Moody Wil- 
lard, head of the department of mathe- 
matics, and of Doctor H. Freeman 
Stecker, professor of mathematics. 

"Professor Willard came to The 
Pennsylvania State College in 1893 and 
for thirty consecutive years adminis- 
tered the department of mathematics. 
He was a competent scholar, a faithful 
and efficient teacher, and a man of 
strong Christian character. He exerted 
always a wholesome and positive in- 
fluence in the college in the direction 
of sound scholarship, earnest academic 
■work, and the highest ideals of indi- 
vidual character. He represented the 
best traditions of American academic 
life and the debt of the college to him 
is greater than can be expressed. 

"Doctor Stecker gave distinction to 
the faculty of The Pennsylvania State 
College for twenty years of devoted 
service. His attainments in the field 
of pure mathematics placed him among 
the first of American mathematicians. 
His contributions in mathematical re- 
search were recognized as notable both 
albroad and in our own country. A 
scholar and teacher of the first order, 
a devoted friend of his students while 
maintaining the highest standards of 
scholarship, his name should stand high 
on the roll of those who have notably 
served this institution." 



-o- 



PUBLIC MEETING 

Members of the faculty who are in- 
terested in the improvement of State 
College as a place of residence are urg- 
ed to attend a public meeting to be 
held in Old IC'hapel on Friday, January 
25, at 7:30 p. m. The meeting is for 
the purpose of discussing the prelimi- 
nary report -of the Zoning Commission 
appointed by Borough Council. 

Mr. B. H. Halderman, expert on city 
planning of the State Bureau of Muni- 
cipalities, will be present to discuss the 
problem. After the views of the citi- 
zens are secured, Borough Council will 
consider the passage of a Zoning Ordin- 
ance. 



FACULTY MEMBERS HONORED 

At the recent annual convention of 
the Coal Mining Institute of America, 
held at Pittsburgh, Dean Holbrook of 
the School of Mines was elected vice- 
president of the Institute for the en- 
suing year. Professor Chedsey of the 
mining department has 'been elected a 
memlber of the board of directors of the 
Johnstown Mining Institute. 



CALENDAR 



FRIDAY, January 25 

Ladies' Night at University Club. 

Public Meeting, Old Chapel, 7:30. 

SATURDAY, January 26 

Basketball — Penn State Freshmen vs. 
Gettysburg Freshmen, 6:30; Penn 
State vs. Bucknell, 7:30. 

SUNDAY, January 27 

There will be no chapel exercises be- 
cause of the "between-semesters" holi- 
day. 

MONDAY, January 28 

Second semester begins, 8:00 a. m. 

TUESDAY, January 29 

Mid-year Convocation, Auditorium, 
7:30 p. m. 



ENGINEERING NOTES 

Dean Sackett attended a very im- 
portant conference called by the Na- 
tional Industrial Conference Board in 
New York last week. The National 
Industrial Conference Board is an or- 
ganization represented by 50,000 indus- 
tries in the United States. It has re- 
cently taken up the question of tech- 
nical education as a preparation of 
men for the industries, and called to 
New York prominent engineering edu- 
cators to meet with the Committee on 
Education representing the industries. 
The purpose is to bring to the smaller 
industries the realization of the im- 
portance of technical education. The 
industry which does not make use of 
the latest scientific and technical 
knowledge and skill will find itself 
handicapped. 



CONCERT AND DANCE 

The Department of Music is planning 
a concert and dance to be given by the 
glee club, assisted by the men's and 
girls' varsity quartettes, on Saturday, 
February 2. The concert will be given 
in the Auditorium at 7:45 and will be 
followed by dancing in the Armory. 
The proceeds are to be used by Direc- 
tor Grant for the establishment of a 
fund to purchase new practice pianos 
for the department. * The instruments 
are badly needed and it is hoped that 
the concert will toe well-attended. 

The price of tickets is $1.00, admit- 
ting to both the concert and dance. 



UNIVERSITY CLUB 

Ladies' Night at the University Club 
will be celebrated on Friday evening of 
this week with dinner and dancing. 
The patronesses will be Mrs. A. E. Mar- 
tin, Mrs. D. F. McFarland, and Mrs. 
M. S. McDowell. Reservations should 
be made with Mr. Clayton. 



W.D. CROCKETT, 

3 13 MAI N ELD Q 



- 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 3 



State College, Pa., January 29, 1924 



NUMBER 18 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

GRADE REPORTS 

The attention of all members of the 
teaching staff is again called to recent 
action of the Council of Administration 
concerning grade reports: 

"All grade reports at the end of any 
semester are due at the offices of the 
deans and of the Registrar one week 
after the date of the examination; or, 
in case there is no examination, one 
veek after the last meeting of the 
class. All delinquent instructors arc 
to be reported to the dean concerned." 



S TIDE > TS WITH DRA W 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 

Senior 
Breth, J. E., EE 

Sophomores 
Johnston. Roy B., CF 
iTruxel, Paul E., PL 
Ward, John W., ICh 

Freshmen 
R'ealey, Edward J., PM 
McCoog, Clarence H., CE 



TRUSTEES ELECT 

The annual meeting of the Beard of 
Trustees was held in Harri.sburg last 
Tuesday. The following officers were 
re-elected: President, Judge H. Walton 
Mitchell; vice-president, J. G. White; 
secretary, Dr. J. M. Thomas ; and the 
Fxecuitive Committee, composed of 
Vance C. McCormick, E. S. Bayard, M. 
,L. Lowry, E. R. Pettebone, J. L Orvis, 
J. P. Shields, and Judge Mitchell. W. 
G. Murtorff, assistant comptroller, was 
chosen,' as acting-treasurer to fill the 
!* icancy caused by the reshrnatio i o2 
P. K. Peet. 



GLEE CLUB CONCERT 

A combined concert and dance will 
le given by the glee club, assisted by 
the men's and girls' varsity quartettes, 
on Saturday evening of this week. The 
concert will itake place in the Auditor- 
ium at 7 : 30, followed toy dancing in the 
Armory. Tickets are $1.00, admitting 
to both concert and dance. 

o 

ATTEND MEETINGS 
Dean Sackett and Professor E. D. 
Walker attended the annual meeting 
iof the American Society of Civil Engi- 
neers in New York last week, and the 
I former also attended a power conser- 
vation meeting in Philadelphia at which 
the "Giant Survey of Pennsylvania" 
I was discussed. In this connection the 
college has been asked to make a study 
or the possible uses of electric power 
on the farm, and the School of Agri- 
culture, with the aid of the School of 
Engineering, is planning to make euch 
a study. 



M 10-YEAR CONVOCATION 

WILL TAKE PLACE TONIGHT 

The annual Mid-Year Commence- 
ment Exercises will take place in the 
An litorium this evening (Taesda\ ) at 
7:30. A class of approximately 30 
men and women will receive bachelor 
degrees while six advanced degrees 
will also be conferred. Although the 
exercise's will be informal, the college 
administrative officers and members 
of the teaching staff will occupy seats 
oil the stage. Academic costume is not 
necessary but may be worn. There 
will be no faculty procession. 

President Thomas will confer the de- 
grees and he will also make the ad- 
dress to the graduating class. The in- 
vocation will be given by Dr. Frazer 
Metzger. Candidates for advanced de- 
grees are requested to assemble with 
the undergraduates in the Foyer of 
the Auditorium at 7:00 and to march 
i;i the procession. 

The following are candidates for ad- 
vanced degrees: Master of Science — 
John W. From, Agricultural Educa- 
tion: Austin L. Patrick, Agronomy: 
Wesley E. Romberger, Chemistry; 
Charles J. Stucky, Chemistry ; Mech- 
anical Engineer — Charles H. B. Hotch- 
kiss and Robert Y. Sigworth, both of 
State College. 



CALENDAR 



ENTERTAINMENT COURSE 

The fifth number of the annual Y. 
M. C. A. and Department of Music en- 
tertainment course is booked for Friday 
evening of this week in the Auditor- 
ium. Alton Packard, cartoonist, will 
tot the attraction, and he comes well 
recommended as an entertainer. Sin- 
gle admission tickets are 75c and will 
be on sale at the Hut during regular 
college office hours. 

The attention of faculty members is 
also called to the sixth numtoer of the 
entertainment course, Reinald Wer- 
renrath, baritone, who will appear on 
Saturday, February 9. Single admis- 
sion tickets for this number will cost 
$1.50, seats going on sale at the Hut 
on February 2. 



CATERING CLASS 

A catering class will be conducted 
every Monday by the senior class in 
Institutional Management of the De- 
partment of Home Economics. In this 
class, the students will be prepared to 
cater for special luncheons, dinners, 
teas, receptions, and banquets. The 
class is also planning to seive severa' 
seventy-five cent dinners that will be 
open to anyone who cares to make re- 
servation individually or for a special 
table. Notice of these dinners will be 
given later. Arrangements for special 
functions should be trade as soon as 
possible, and not later than two weeks 
in advance of the desired date. 



TUESDAY, January 29 

Mid-year Convocation, 7:30, Audi- 
t« l'ium. 

FRIDAY, February 1 

Alton Packard, cartoonist, S:00. Audi- 
torium. 

SATURDAY, February 2 

Basketball — Penn State Fresh vs. 
Carnegie Tech Fresh, Armory. 

Glee Club concert — dance, 7:30, Audi- 
torium. 

Card Party at University Club. Mem- 
bers and partners. 

SUNDAY, February 3 

No chapel speaker. A musical pro- 
gram has been arranged. 

PENN STATE PLAYERS 

The Penn State Players will present 
Kauffman and Connelley's popular 
farce "To the Ladies" on February S, 
in the Auditorium. Tickets can now 
'be secured from D. D. Mason, Univer- 
sity Club, the price being fifty and. 
seventy-five cents. Members of the 
faculty are urged to secure their tick- 
< I:, at once to insure good seats. 

o — — 

LIBERAL ARTS LECTURE 

The next number of the free lecture 
series will take place on Tuesday even- 
ing, February 5, at 7:00 o'clock in Old 
Chapel. The speaker will be Dr E. W. 
P.unkle, whose subject has beeen an- 
nounced as "Views and Reviews of 
Penn State." The lecture will be il- 
lustrated. 

o — 

FORESTRY PRIZE 

The Honorable Charles Lathrop 
Pack, of Lakewood, New Jersey, presi- 
dent of the American Tree Association, 
has presented to the College a fund of 
$1,000, the proceeds of which will con- 
stitute a prize to be awarded each year 
to a student in the Forestry Depart- 
ment who excels in the writing of for- 
estry as it affects the public. Mr. 
Pack's idea in establishing this prize is 
to help to train forestry students so as 
to increase their ability to write and to 
speak on both public and private for- 
estry. 

o— 

CAMPAIGN RECEIPTS 

Campaign receipts for the past week 
wsire as follows: 

Men students $1750 

New York City 1330 

Warren 350 

Faculty 75 

Lehigh 25 

Allegheny 5 

Elk „_ __ 4 

Total $3539 



■ . n . 

3 13 



,$ 



Ji 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
Item- "* interest to the facul- 



v OLUME 



Th 



e 



Pennsylvania State College 

:n 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan. Bulletin Edi- 
toi 175 Main Building:, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



Stale College, Pa., February 5, 1924 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



ENGINEEBING FACULTY 

A meeting of the faculty of the. School 
of Engineering to consider student rec- 
ords is called for Tuesday evening, Feb- 
ruary 5, at 7:00 in Room 200, Engineer- 
ing D. — iC. L. Kinsloe, secretary. 



STUDENTS WITKDBAW 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 

Junior 
Trevorrow, George; C, Mng 

Soplioniores 
Gilson, Alfred A., CE 
Kile, Charles W., ME 
Ramsay, Arthur, ME 
Reynolds, Simeon R., Mng 
White, Orval W... AE 

Freshmen 
Griffin, Wayne, CE 
Peek, Efoen M., CE 
Reed, Thomas N., CE 
Thompson, Truman B., AE 
Two- Year Ag\ 
Morrow, Walter P. 

MEMOEIAL SEEVICES 

The college chapel exercises on Wed- 
nesday and Thursday mornings will be 
memorial services for the late Former- 
President Woodrow Wilson. Br. Dun- 
away will speak on both mornings. 



o 

EEUISTEAE'S OFFICE MOVED 

Due to extensive repairs that are toe- 
ing made to the Registrar's office on 
the first floor of Old Main, the Regis- 
trar and his staff have been forced to 
taka up temporary quarters in the Nat- 
ural History Museum, 211 Main. The 
College Examiner and the College Sch- 
eduling Officer may also be found at 
that location. 

In their temporary quarters, these 
college officials have no telephone con- 
nection so that they cannot be reached 
except by personal visitation. The stu- 
pendous task of recording grades for 
the past semester is going forward 
steadily under handicaps, which leads us 
to agree with Mr. Hoffman when he 
says that although he and his staff 
are quarcered in the museum, all the 
"dead ones " are behind glass. 



"WEBBENEATIX HEEE SATUEDAY 

Reinald Werrenrath, famous baritone, 
will appear at Penn State on Saturday 
evening of this week at 8:00 in the 
Auditorium. He comes as the sixth 
feature of the annual Y. M. C. A. and 
Department of Music entertainment 
course. Tickets are on sale, at the "Y" 
Hut, the price being $1.50. 



ON LEAVES OF ABSENCE 

The following members of the Fac- 
ulty are spending a leave of absence 
authorized by the Board of Trustees: 

W. A. Broyles, Professor of Agricul- 
tural Education, at University of Illi- 
nois. 

W. E. Butt, Assistant Professor of 
Economics, Yale University. 

A. L. Carter, Assistant Professor of 
English, Fellow of the Scandinavian 
Foundation, Copenhagen, Denmark. 

B. W. Daily, Associate Professor of 
Education, Columbia University. 

F. Marguerite Erikson, Instructor in 
Plome Economics Extension, Columbia 
University. 

H. R. Gamble, Instructor in Archi- 
tectural Engineering, at Fountaine- 
bleau, France. 

P. P. Henshall, Assistant Professor of 
Machine Shop Practice, with the J. J. 
Nesbitt Company, Atlantic City, N.J. 

J. C. Hudson, Instructor in Physios, 
Harvard University. 

Zora Klain, Assistant Professor of 
German, University of Pennsylvania. 

R. D. Lewis, Instructor in Agronomy, 
Cornell University. 

C. E. Marquardt, Professor of Rom- 
ance Philology and College Examiner, 
Harvard University. 

D. S. Mead, Instructor in English, 
Princeton University. 

F. L. Pattee, Professor of American 
Literature, University of Illinois. 

H. W. Popp. Assistant Professor of 
Botany, Thompson Institute. 

H. W. Shoenberger, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of English, University of Penn- 
sylvania. 

F. R. Smith, Assistant Professor ot 
Physics, University of Michigan. 

Mary Spalding, Instructor in Home 
Economics Extension, Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

Major M. D. Welty, Professor of Mili- 
tary Science and Tactics, Fort Leaven- 
worth, Kansas. 

L. Evelyn Wilson, Assistant in Home- 
Economics Extension, at Douglas, Ga. 



o 



LIBEEAL AETS 1ECTUBE 
Tonight's lecture in the Liberal Arts 
series will be given by Dr. Runkle on 
"Views and Reviews of Penn State" at 
7:00 in the Old Chapel. Next week's 
talk will be by Dr. Frazer Metzger, 
college chaplain, on "Abraham Lincoln", 
at the same time and place. 



EELIGIQUS DISCUSSION 

All members of the faculty who are 
interested in the religious and social 
conference which will be conducted by 
Sherwood Eddy from February 17 to 
19, are invited to meet for discussion at 
4:30 today (Tuesday), in Room US, 
Main Building. 



NUMBER 19 



CALENDAR 

TUESDAY, February 5 

ing faculty meeting, 7:00, 
i 200, Eng. D. 
Liberal Arts Lecture, 7:00, Old Chap- 
el. 

Penn State Grange, public lecture 
hour, 8:00, Room 100, Hort. 

FEIDAY, February 8 
Penn State Players, 3:15, Auditorium. 
PUEDAY, February 9 

Athletic Events. Penn State vs. Syra- 
cuse, wrestling, 2:00; West Branch Y. 
M. iC. A.. 1 oxing,4:00; Penn State Fresh- 
men vs. St. Francis College, basketball, 
6:30; Penn State vs. Duqucsne, basket- 
ball, 7:30. 

Reinald Werrenrath, baritone, Audi- 
torium, 8:00. 

Club night at University Club. 
SUNDAY, February 10 

Chapel Speaker — Dr. Henry PI. Twee- 
dy, Yale Divinity School, New Plaven, 
Conn. 

PENN STATE PLAYEES 

Faculty members who enjoy good 
American fun and plenty of it will do 
well to see the Penn State Players on 
Friday evening of this week in their 
production of "To The Ladies" which 
will be given in the Auditorium at 8:15. 
had a long and successful run 
on Broadway only a season ago and is 
guaranteed to furnish an evening of 
merriment. Tickets may be ordered 
through D. D. Mason, University Club, 
and iLey will also be on sale at the box 
office on the night of the performance. 
Price, fifty and seventy-five cents. 

o — 

CAMPAIGN RECEIPTS 

Campaign receipts for the past week 
were as follows : 

New York City $1770 

New Jersey 1500 

New Students 300 

(Chester 270 

Faculty 125 

Luzerne 125 

Dauphin 105 

heny 100 

Bradford 100 

Bucks 50 

Pike 13 

Monroe 10 



Total 



An aracle on "The Course in Great 
Literature for College Undergraduates", 
by Professor A. L. Carter, of the Eng- 
lish department, appeared in the Jan- 
uary issae of the Educational Review. 
Professor Carter is now on a leave of 
absence at the University of Copenhag- 
en. 



" y* 



'■'< . P. CRpex: TT , 
3 13 V A I N B L G 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State 



Y13UL 




Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan. Bulletin Edi- 
tor 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturdav 



VOLUME 3 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

TEACHING SCHEDULE 
Each member of the teaching staff 
will please send to the Scheduling Of- 
ficer before February 19, a copy of his 
ictual schedule, indicating the room 
(number and building) in which he is 
located at any given time. 



REPORT CLASSROOM VACANCIES 

A larger number of sections meet- 
ing this semester has created an un- 
usually heavy demand for classrooms. 
It is requested, therefore, that mem- 
bers of the teaching staff immediately 
notify the College Scheduling Officer 
concerning sections which now meet in 
different rooms or at different hours 
from those originally scheduled. If 
sections have been disbanded, that in- 
formation should also be given, indi- 
cating the former hour and place of 
meeting. 

This information should be forward- 
ed at once in writing' to the Schedul- 
ing Officer, 214 Old Main.— C. P. Mac- 
Innis. 



COLLEGE STUDENTS IN U. S. 
The following article on "College Stu- 
lents in the United States" was written 
3y Professor A. H. Espenshade and ap- 
peared in the January 19th issue of 
SCHOOL AND SOCIETY; it should be 
jf interest to all members ctf the fac- 
Jlty: 
"A recent publication of the Bureau of 
ducation gives some interesting facts 
md figures about the number and dis- 
ribution of college and professional stu- 
lents in the United States. The figures 
ire based upon the statistical returns 
or the year 1920-21. 

"In that year there were 448,267 stu- 
dents attending colleges and profession- 
il schools. New York leads all the 
itates in taking care of 55,130 students, 
nore than one-tenth of the total. Penn- 
ylvania stands second, with 36,262 stu- 
lents attending its colleges. Six states 
vith at least twenty thousand students 
ach — New York, Pennsylvania, Illinois, 
)hio, Massachusetts, and California — 
each a total of 201,145, or nearly one- 
lalf of the whole number. 

At the bottom of the list stands Dela- 
ware with 402 students in attendance, 
'he six states standing lowest in the 
■umber of students in their colleges are 
>elaware, Wyoming, New Mexico, Ne- 
ada, Arizona, and Idaho, with an ag- 
regate attendance of 4373. 
"In number of students in proportion 
J the population the District of Colum- 
ia leads all the states, with one college 
tudent to every 96 persons. Tennessee 
cands at the bottom, with one student 
) 604 people. Pennsylvania ranks 
■venty-seventh, with one student in 
'ery 252 inhabitants. 
Nineteen states teach more students 
fan are residents of the state; that is, 



State College, Pa., February 12, 1924 



thera are twenty-nine states that do not 
take care of as many college students as 
reside within the state. In this latter 
list it is rather surprising to find three 
New England states — Maine, Vermont, 
and Connecticut. The nine states each 
of which teaches at least a thousand 
more students than are residents of the 
state- are — Massachusetts, 8064; New 
York, 5848; District of Columbia, 5118; 
Iowa, 3701; Michigan, 2451; California, 
1979; Pennsylvania, 1771; Virginia, 
1330; and Wisconsin, 1007. 

The foregoing nine states care for 
31,269 more college students than are 
resident within their borders. This 
number of excess students is greater 
than the total number of students in 
attendance at all the colleges of seven- 
teen states. 

The- eight states each of which takes 
care of the education of at least a 
thousand fewer students than are resi- 
dents of the state are — New Jersey, 
5545 less; Texas, 2225 less; Mississi- 
ppi, 1596 less; Ohio, 1395 less; Kansas, 
1292 less; West Virginia, 1241 less; 
Kentucky, 1127 less; Arkansas, 1074 
less. 

These eight under-privileged states 
have a total of 16,495 college students 
living within their borders in excess of 
the number attending their colleges. 

Two isolated facts of particular in- 
terest are these: (1) Pennsylvania 
stands at the very bottom of the list in 
•receiving the smallest per capita ap- 
propriation for its state institutions of 
higher education, which is seventeen 
cents. (2) At the present time 51 
per cent of high school graduates in 
the United States enter college. 



A. A. A. S. 

At a joint meeting of the American 
Association for the Advancement of 
Science and the Liebig Chemical So- 
ciety to be held at 8:00 on Monday 
evening, February 18, in Room 200, 
Old Mining Building, Dr. H. E. Barn- 
ard, director of the American Institute 
of Baking, will speak on the subject 
"How Science Serves the Baker." Tim 
lecture will be open to the public. 

Preceding the lecture, at 6:30, the 
A A. A. S. will hold a dinner-meeting 
at the University Club when officers 
will be elected. 



SALE OF MEAT 

The sale of fresh and cured meai 
being conducted by the Department oi 
Animal Husbandry will be continued 
throughout the semester until Com- 
mencement. The schedule of hours at 
h lie meat can be purchased at 
the retail shop in the stock judging 
pavilion is as follows : 

Monday— 10:00 to 12:00. 

Tuesday— 10:00 to 12:00; 2:00 to 5:03. 

Wednesday— 11:00 to 12:00. 

Thursday— 2:00 to 5:00. 

Friday— 3:00 to 5:00. 

Saturday— 9 : 00 to 12:00. 



NUMBER 20 

CALENDAR 

TUESDAY, February 12 

Liberal Arts Lecture, 'Abraham Lin- 
coln.' by Dr. Metzger, Old Chapel, 
7:00. 

Second hearing on proposed Zoning 
Ordinance, Nittany Theatre, 8:00 p. m. 
SATURDAY, February 16 

Wrestling, Penn State vs. Spring- 
field. 

Club night at University Club. 

SUNDAY. February 17 
Chapel Speaker — Dr. Sherwood Eddy, 
oi New York. 

MONDAY, February 18 
A. A. A. S. dinner-meeting, Univer- 
sity Club, 0:30; public lecture by Dr. 
H. E. Barnard, Room 200, Old Mining, 
8:00. 

DIl. THOMAS IN FLORIDA 

President and Mrs. John M. Thomas 
are spending the month of February at 
Deland, Florida, enjoying a well-earned 
rest after a most strenuous year of 
activity for Penn State. Dr. Tho^ias ex- 
pects to return about the first of March. 

o 

LIBERAL ARTS LECTURE 
Next week's lecture in the Liberal 
Arts series will be given by Dr. F. W. 
.Pierce, his subject being "Schiller in the 
Literature of Germany and of the 
World". Tonight (Tuesday) at 7:00 in 
Old Chapel, Dr. Metzger will speak on 
"Abraham Lincoln". 

o 

ATTENDED CONFERENCE 
Professor A. J. Wood, representing 
the American Society of Mechanical 
Engineers and the college engineering 
experiment station, attended an impor- 
tant conference in New York last week 
called by the Engineering Division of 
the National Research Council. The 
purpose of the conference was to lay 
hefo.re the Council the necessity of co- 
ordinating the various interests and 
extending the investigations so that 
constants ox accepted value may be es- 
tablished. 

o — 

CAMPAIGN RECEIPTS 

Campaign receipts for the past week 
were as follows: 

New York $2090 

New Students 1400 

New Jersey 805 

Erie 290 

Chester 165 

Mercer 60 

Luzerne 25 

Bucks 1S 

Faculty 4-" 

Jefferson ° 

Bradford 4 

Lycoming 2 

Total $4879 



W .P.CROCKETT. 
313 Sv'AIN 3LHG. 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

Tivr 



VOLUME 3 

OFFICIAL NOTICES 

COLLEGE SENATE 

The regular meeting of the College 
Senate will be held on Thursday even- 
ing, February 21, at 7:30, in the Foyer 
of the Auditorium. 



AGRICULTURAL FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the faculty 
of the School of Agriculture on Thurs- 
day afternoon, Feb. 21, at 4:30, in Room 
103 Ag.— K. L. Watts, dean. 



LIBERAL ARTS FACULTY 

The Liberal Arts faculty will meet on 
Wednesday, February 20, at 4:30, in 
Room 25 Liberal Arts Bunding — L. V. 
T. Simmons, secretary. 



STUDENTS DROPPED 

The following students were dropped 
from college at the end of the first 
semester under the ru L y per cent rule. 
The names are given in alphabetical 
order according to the classification of 
•"he Student Directory: 

3 Abbott, James Henry, ICh 
*""4 Allen, Charles H., AL 

A Allison, Everett D., Ag 

3 Anskis, Reginald V., Ch 

4 Applegate, Ralph M., Ech 
4 Backderf, Ivan C, CF 

4 Baer, May Elizabeth, CF 

4 Barton, Robert J., EE 

3 Beeman, Charles H., Mng 

3 Beer, Kenneth E., CF 

4 Brahin, Charles, AL 

4 Briesacher, William R., CE 
j 4 Briola, Patrick P., PL 
t^4 Buck, Emil C, CF 

4 Campbell, Clifton J., ME 
I 4 Carlucci, Herbert J., ME 

3 Clarke, Donald B., EE 

4 Coffman, William J., AL 
3 Conrad, Leroy C, Ech 

3 Copeland, Kenneth, AEd 

4 Corl, Harold Joseph, EE 
3 Cover, Morris V., ICH 

3 Crossen, William H., EE 

4 DePierre, Francis.AH 

3 DeWitt, Stanley A., Hrt 

3 Downey, Joseph E., PM 

4 Durner, Paul M., CF 

4 Enck, Carrell E., AEd 

4 Farnsworth, Arney L., Ag 

3 Fellows, Charles E., ICH 

3 Finch, James M., AE 

4 Fitler, Henry B., CF 

3 Foerster, Frederick L., ICH 
j AFrutchey, Irvin W., Ag 
: 3 Gartoer, W. Arthur, EE 
j 2 Gerhard, Hugh F., DH 

3 Ghrist, Thomas S., IE 

3 Golembiewski, J. B., CE 

4 Gracey, James C, Ag 
4 Graff, George F., Met 

4 Gruber, Charles A., AEd 
3 Hanchett, Donald, ICH 
3 Harsh, Melvin H..RME 
3 Hinckley, Herschell A., EE 
3 Houck, Joseph F., PM 
A Howell, Harold Hops, Ag 



Contributions must be * = 
bi ief as possible, and reach 
G W. Sullivan. Bulletin Edl 
tor. 175 Main Building, nol lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturda\ 



State College, Pa., February 19, 1924 



4 Humphreys, Robert Lee, PL 
4 James, Walter Scott, Hrt 

3 Jarmolowicz, C, PM 

2 Jordan, Henry iS., FF 

4 Karlen, Wm. Paul, PL 
4 Kemp, Marion H., AL 

4 Kirk, Robert M., Mng 
2 Lederer, Milton M., EE 

2 Loy, Paul B., EE 

3 McCann, Ernest H., CF 
A Magill, Kirk W., Ag 

3 Mallory, E. R., EE 

4 Mapes, Dean M., IE 

4 Marshall, Clifford R., Met 
4 Mease, Charles L., ME 
4 Meise, Joseph D., Ag 
4 Morgan, G. H., PM 
3 Morris, John E., Mng 
3 Moury, Norman B., NS 

3 Noecker, Luke J., PM 
UPage, Tilghman A. 

4 Paxton, Harry D., NS 
4 Petrilli, Philip F., TT 

3 Poole, Robert H., Ech 

4 Putney, Willard, CF 
3 Rayl, F. W., OF 

3 Repsher, Harry F., ME 
3 Reynolds, Simeon, Mng 
3 Robinson, Robert G., CE 

3 Rockwell, Clea M., PM 

4 Shank, John R., CF 

2 iShutt, Jesse J., DH 

3 Siebert, Carl C, IE 

4 ISkinner, Kenneth C, AE 

3 Sours, Marion D., EE 

4 Stahle, Robert R., Ech 

3 Sutherland, Edward D., EE 
2 Titus, Donald F., EE 

2 Trevorrow, George C., Mng 

3 Vought, Marlen E., PM 
3 Watson, Alvin C, IE 

3 Woche, Albert W., !CE 

2 Wood, Harry Maxwell, RME 
2 Wood, Thomas E., Ag 

4 Young, Frederick W., Ag. 



NUMBER 21 



The following were dropped from the 
School of Engineering: 

3 Dieffenbaugh, Richard C, EE 

2 Kelly, Edward F., EE 

3 Kerr, Andrew, CE 

3 Reid, Kenneth R., ME 

o 

PERMANENTLY DROPPED 
The following students were dropped 
permanently toy the schools indicated: 

4 Adams, Ralph Harold, PL 
2 Bausam, Harry W., CF 

2 Cimtoala, Joseph A., EE 

4 Cunningham, Theodore M., LA 

3 Finnegan, John A., EE 

3 Rigby, John E., ME 

4 Trout, Harry P., CF 

o 

LIBERAL ARTS LECTURE 

Next Tuesday's lecture in the Lib- 
eral Arts series will be given by Pro- 
fessor Hugo Bezdek on "The Place of 
Athletics in College Life." The lecture 
svill be in Old Chapel at 7:00. Tonight's 
lecture will be by Dr. F. W. Pierce on 
"Schiller in the Literature of Germany 
and of the World." 



CALENDAR 

WEDNESDAY, February 20 
liberal Arts faculty meeting, 4:30, 
Room 25 L. A. 

THURSDAY, February 21 

Agricultural faculty meeting, 4:30, 
Room 103 Ag. 

College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Audi- 
torium. 

FRIDAY, February 22 
Basketball, Penn State vs. Pitt: 
Freshman game, 6:30; varsity, 7:30. 
Dinner-dance at University Club. 

SATURDAY, February 23 
Wrestling, Penn State vs. Navy, 2:30; 
boxing, Penn State vs. Syracuse, 7:00. 
SUNDAY, February 21 
Chapel Speaker — Dr. Metzger. 

STUDENTS REINSTATED 
The following students who were 
dropped have been reinstated in the 
Probation Section: 

3 .Schantz, Joe H., PM 

4 Steele, Tracey F., Ch 
3 Reid, Kenneth R., ME 

The following dropped students were 
reinstated: 

3 Kearney, William H., OiA 

3 Moore, George B., DH 

4 Reynolds, Nevin R., ICH 

3 iShenck, Daniel L., LArch 
3 Wil'ford, John F., ChA 



SWEDISH SCIENTIST HERE 
Mr. H. Edin, chemist at the Swed- 
ish Royal Agricultural Experiment 
Station, Stockholm, has been at the 
college for the past three weeks study- 
ing- the work that has been done by 
the Institute of Animal Nutrition. Mr. 
Edin was sent to this country to make 
a study of experiment stations, more 
particularly the methods of nutrition 
investigations with farm animals. 

He has been studying the respira- 
tion calorimeter, the only one of its 
kind in the world, and also the reports 
ol the nutrition work djne here. The 
Swedish Experiment Station is plan- 
ning to build respiration chambers for 
cattle and smaller animals following 
Mr. Edin's tour of inspection. He will 
remain here for another week or two. 



CAMPAIGN RECEIPTS 
Campaign receipts for the past week 
were as follows: 

New York City $1570 

New Students 500 

Allegheny 130 

Indiana (state) 100 

Schuylkill 100 

Minnesota 50 

Lancaster 35 

South Carolina 30 

Delaware county 25 

Beaver 15 

Total $2555 



' : • • n . c r c -~ v - 

*■' * • w v*f r- 



^ x O 



" ; A in bldg 



Published every Tuesday 
iring the college year as a 
eans of making official an- 
juncements and presenting 
»ms of interest to the facul- 



The Pennsylvania State Coll 



allege 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



3LUME 



State College, Pa., February 26, 1924 



NUMBER 22 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



.COLLEGE SENATE 

Lack of a quorum prevented the meet- 
s' of the College Senate last week, 
se meeting' will be held on Thursday 
eaing of this week at 7:80 in the 
>yer of the Auditorium when it is 
ipod there will be a full turnout. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

Since the close of the first semester, 
e following students have left college: 

Seniors 
essersmith, C. E., ME 
ishler, Gilbert, EE 
lulie, G. J., CE 
jsseter, N. J., Arch 

Juniors 
eighan, H. A., PL 
hlicker, Dorothy, AL 

Sophomores 
)Mb, J. V. AL 
)naldson, R. O., Mng 
)ttshall, W. C. B., CE 
ill, C. F. A., Ag 
■illoran, C. M., Met 
hnson, F. C, ME 
.mlball, IC. W., LA 
chards, H. C, ME 
tigleton, H. C, Ch 
lyder, S. C, Ech 
oker, J. W., AE 

Freshmen 
len, Edward S. Jr., PM 
lird, D. C, Ag 
effenbacher, R. L., Met 
irborow, W. C, EE 
•egory, D. E., TT 
las, R. L., LArch 
orton, C. E., EE 
nisely, W. G., EE 
srolov, J., TT 
onaghan, J. H., Arch 
rkis, Abraham, PM 



STUDENT GARDENS 

Th$ Department of Horticulture an- 
'Unces that Student Gardens will again 

available at the close of the college 
■ar in June upon payment of a fee of 
.00. These- gardens will be 20X40 feet 

size and will be planned and exec- 
ed by students in Hort. 3 and 203. 
pplications should be made by letter 

F. W. Haller or to the Division of 

getable Gardening. 



ATTEND MINING MEETING 

Dean Holbrook, Professor McFarland. 
id Professor Chedsey, of the School of 
ines, attended the annual meeting of 
.e American Institute of Mining and 
etallurgical Engineers in New York 
st week. Dean Holbrook, as chairman 
the Educational Committee of the 
istitute, presented a report on safety 
lucation. Professor Chedsey gave a 
'Port on the industrial relations be- 
[f'een miner and employer. 



FELLOWSHIPS 

Announcements of various available 
research and graduate study fellowships 
are being received by Dean F. D. Kern 
of the Graduate School, and in a belief 
that some members of the faculty may 
be interested, a list of those already re- 
ceived is given herewith. These are 
listed as ibriefly as possible, and more 
detailed information concerning them 
may be obtained from Dean Kern. 
National Research Council Fellowships 
in Biological Sciences: Post-Doctorate 
fellowships in zoology, botany, anthro- 
pology, and psychology; the basic sti- 
pends are $1800 for unmarried men and 
$2300 for married men. 
The American- Scandinavian Foundation 
Travelling Fellowships: Twenty fellow- 
ships of 'at (least $1000 for graduate study 
in the Scandinavian countries; 10 in 
Sweden, 5 in Denmark, 5 in Norway; 
various subjects. 

Universities Bureau of the British Em- 
pire: Research studentships, 200 pounds 
per year, Trinity College, Cambridge; 
election to be made at the end of July. 

and in every subsequent year. 
Yale University: Two Seessel Fellow- 
ships, $1500 each, in biology; four Bish- 
op Museum Fellowships, $1000 each, an- 
thropology, botany, zoology, geology, or 
geography for investigators in the Pac- 
ific Ocean region. 

University of California: Numerous 
fellowships in chemistry, commerce, 
medicine, electrical engineering, history, 
agriculture, and other subjects, yield- 
ing amounts varying from $500 to $1500. 
The University of Pennsylvania: Two 
Harrison Fellowships, $1500 each, any 
field included in the Graduate School; 
ten fellowships, $1000 each, exemption 
from fees, and a $50 book fund, any 
subject; one fellowship in physics, 
$1000; six fellowships for women, $200 
— $250 and exemption from fees. 



PREPARING RADIO ARTICLES 

Faculty members who prepare ar- 
ticles for broadcasting at the college 
radio station are urged to insert as 
frequently as is consistent with the 
nature of the article the expression 
"Penn State' or "The Pennsylvania 
State College." This precaution is nec- 
essary for the benefit of the thousands 
of people "listening in" over the en- 
tire territory east of the Rocky Moun- 
tains, many of whom may pick up the 
local station in the midst of a talk. 
Their hearing one of these expressions 
in the course of the talk aids in their 
identification of the station broadcast- 
ing. Some talks will not lend them- 
selves to this practice, but where pos- 
sible this precaution should be taken. 
— D. M. Cresswell. 



CALENDAR 

TUESDAY, February 26 

Liberal Arts lecture, Professor Bez- 
dek, 7:00, Old Chapel. 

THURSDAY, February 28 

|C:oliege Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Audi- 
torium. 

SATURDAY, March 1 

Basketball, Penn State Freshmen vs. 
Kisk'i. 

SUNDAY, March 2 

Chapel Speaker — The Reverend Ralph 
B. Urmy, of Bellevue Methodist Church, 
Believue, Pa. 



REGISTRAR'S OFFICE OPEN 

The Registrar and his staff, including 
the Scheduling Officer and College Ex- 
aminer, have returned to their regular 
offices on the first floor of Old Main 
where they are transacting business as 
usual. The offices have been complete- 
ly renovated. 

O' 

LIBERAL ARTS LECTURE 

Next Tuesday's lecture in the Liberal 
Arts series will be given by Dr. H. M. 
Jjattenhouse, on "The- Book of Job: A 
Literary Study". Tonight's lecture at 
7:00 in Old Chapel will be given by 
Professor Hugo' Bezdek on the subject 
"The Place of Athletics in College Life". 



DRESSMAKING COURSE 

Faculty women and wives of faculty 
members may be intertested in a series 
of lessons on the making of washable 
dresses now being given by the Depart- 
ment of Home Economics. The lessons 
are open to any one interested and are 
held on Wednesday evenings from 7:15 
to 9:15 in Room 14 of the Women's 
Building. 



CAMPAIGN RECEIPTS 

Campaign receipts for the past week 
amounted to §1300. 



FACULTY MEN HONORED 

A number of members of the agricul- 
tural faculty were, honored at the re- 
cent Farm Products Show in Harris- 
burg. Dr. S. W. Fletcher was re-elect- 
ed secretary of the State Horticultural 
Association, and W. B. Nissiey was el- 
ected secretary of the. vegetable grow- 
ers branch of that association. The 
(State Poultry Association selected H. 
D. Munroe as their secretary, and vot- 
ed to send H. C. Knandel to the World's 
Poultry Congress in Spain this year. 

H. H. Havner was re-elected secre- 
tary of the Breeders' and Dairymen's 
Association, and E. B. Fitts as a mem- 
ber of the board of directors. The Here- 
ford Breeders' Association elected F. L. 
Bentley as their secretary, and W. H. 
Tomhave, as a director. The Pennsyl- 
vania Sheep and Wool Growers' Asso- 
ciation re-elected W. B. Connell secre- 
tary*, 



» . . C R ■ C K £ T T , 

3 13 U A I N B L D G , 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
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Items of Interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
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er than 11 A. M. each Saturdav 



VOLUME 3 



State College, Pa., March 4, 1924 



NUMBER 23 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

RE-EXAMIN ATIOM S 

It is not necessary for students to 
present re-examination permits in ord- 
er to take re-examinations as scheduled 
for the various days in -March. A com- 
plete list of all students entitled to the 
re-examinations will in all cases be 
mailed to the department head concern- 
d— W. S. Hoffman, Registrar. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
tudents have left college: 

Junior 
Dunbar, V. D., C'F 

Sophomores 
3J?rkaniper, Joseph, IE 
31eil, C. E., CF 
fullerton, James W„ Hrt 

Freshmen 
r ernsler, George R., Ag 
lush, Theodore, CF 
Vard, Robert A., CF 
■Volfe, J. F„ PL 



STUDENT'S DROPPED 

The following students have been 
ropped from college : 

Under 50% Rule 
Elsler, John M., Hrt 

Permanently 
Maurer, Earl W., AH 



STUDENTS REINSTATED 

The following dropped students have 
een reinstated: 
Wood, Thomas E., Ag 
Briola, P. P., PL 

The following students have been re- 
stated in the Probation Section: 
Abbott, James H., UCh 
Farnsworth, Arney L., Ag 

o ■ 

INSTRUCTORS' SCHEDULES 

Only aibout one-half of the members 
f 'the teaching staff have as yet com- 
lied with the request of the College 
Scheduling- Officer to furnish him with 

copy of their complete teaching sched- 
le. Those who have- not already at- 
ended to this matter are asked to do 
o at once. — C. P. Maclnnis. 

ATTENDS CONFERENCE 

Professor R. W. Grant, of the music 
epartmlent, after taking the glee club 
3 the New York intercollegiate contest 
fet Saturday, left for Rochester, N.Y., 
'here he will attend the annual con- 
erences of Eastern Music Supervisors, 
larch 4 to 8 inclusive. Professor Grant 
a charter member of the organiza- 
on and is chairman of the board of 
irectors. 



GRADUATE ENROLLMENT 

The following figures on the enroll- 
ment of the Graduate Schoul fur the 
present semester have just been com- 
piled by Dean F. D. Kern : 
Tclal number of graduate students — 126. 
New students: From Penn iState — 9. 
Other institutions — 5. 
Women students — 13 (12 carrying class 

■work; 1 working on thesis), 
'total carrying class work — 95. 
Thesis, only — 12. 
Technical degrees — 19. 
Number of graduate students already 
possessing Master's' degrees — 1C. 
Of the 107 resident students the ma- 
jors are as follows: 

Agriculture — 21, distributed as follows: 
Agronomy 2; Animal Husbandry 1: 
Agricultural Economics 1; Botany 5; 
Chemical Agriculture 5 ; Dairy Hus- 
bandry 5; Horticulture 1; Bacteri- 
ology 1. 
Education — 16, distributed as follows: 
Agricultural Education 5: Home Eco- 
nomics 2; Education and Psycho- 
logy 9. 
Ung-ineering — 14, distributed as follows: 
Civil engineering 2; Electro-chemical 
engineering 3; Industrial engineering 
4 ; Mechanical engineering 5. 
Liberal Arts — 33, distributed as follows: 
Economics 5; English 14; German 1; 
History 2; Mathematics 5; Philoso- 
phy 1 ; Romance Languages 5. 
Mines — 4, distributed as follows: Geol- 
ogy 2; Metallurgy 1; Mining 1. 
Natural Science — 13, distributed as fol- 
lows: Chemistry 10; Physics 3. 
Unclassified — 6. 

The growth of the Graduate School is 

indicated by enrollment figures of this 

year compared with those of a year ago : 

1922-23 1923-21 

First semester 107 121 

Second semester 117 126 



A. A. U. P. ELECTIONS 

At a recent meeting of the Penn State 
Chapter of the American Association 
of University Professors, the following 
officers were elected for the calendar 
year, 1924: 

President, Professor C. A. Bonine; 
vice-president, Miss Lo'uise B. Moss ; 
secretary, Dr. Henry W. Thurston; and 
treasurer, Dr. F. W. Pierce. 

o 

ASKED TO HELP 

The Department of Agricultural Edu- 
cation has received a request from the 
National Farm School, located near 
Doylestown, to inspect their plant, to 
Observe the work of their school, and 
to help them reorganize their plan of 
instruction. 

o 

ATTENDS DEDICATION 

Professor J. A. Ferguson, head of the 
forestry department, read a paper at 
the dedication of the New Yale For- 
estry School Building- at New Haven, 
last week. 



CALENDAR 

TUESDAY, March 4 

Liberal Arts Lecture, Dr. Batten- 
house, 7:30, Old Chapel. 

THURSDAY, March C 

Basketball, Penn State vs. Allegheny, 
7:00. 

SATURDAY, March 8 

Athletic events — Penn State vs. Cor- 
ntll, wrestling; Penn State Freshmen 
vs. West Virginia Freshmen, wrestling; 
Penn State vs. Lafayette, basketball. 
Wrestling will probably be in afternoon, 
basketball in evening. 

SUNDAY, March 9 

Chape! Speaker — Bishop F. J. Me- 
Connell, D.D., of Pittsburgh. 

DR. THOMAS RETURNS 

President Thomas returned Saturday 
from Deland, Florida, after a month 
of well-earned vacation, and he is now 
back at the helm of the good ship Penn 
State ready to steer a steady course 
along the next lap of the journey to- 
ward a Greater Penn 'State. 



ROOKS FOR JAPAN 

The recent 'earthquake and conflagra- 
tion in Japan destroyed the libraries of 
several important educational institu- 
tions. At the Imperial University of 
Tokyo alone, more than 500,000 volumes 
were lost. A number of American col- 
leges and universities are gathering 
gifts of books for Japanese libraries, the 
movement being fostered by the Car- 
negie Endowment for International 
Peace. 

Penn State has been asked to help, 
and books of all sorts and kinds will be 
welcome, particularly those in the fields 
of law, philosophy, political economy, 
sociology, fine arts, literature, and the 
natural sciences. Books written by 
faculty members and autographed by 
their authors will be highly valued. 

Any faculty members who desire to 
donate books to this cause may leave 
them with Dr. Runkle at the Carnegie 
Library. 

— o 

LIBERAL ARTS LECTURE 

Tonight's lecture in the Liberal Arts 
series will be given by Dr. H. M. Bat- 
tenhouse on "The Book of Job: A Lite- 
rary Study", at 7:00 in Old Chapel. 
Dean C. W. Stoddart will be next Tues- 
day's speaker at the same time and 
place, his subject being announced as 
"The Menace to Education." 

CAMPAIGN RECEIPTS 

During the past week campaign re- 
ceipts reached the low-water mark, 
amounting to only $768. Only about 35 
per cent of the new members of the 
faculty have contributed to the cam- 
paign. 



-o 






v<.^-"" . ttl.pG 



% \ O 



^^ 



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The Pennsylvania State College 



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brief as possible, and reach 
O. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
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VOLUME 



State College, Pa., March 11, 1924 



NUMBER 24 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



LIBERAL ARTS FACULTY 

The Liberal Arts faculty will meet 
on Wednesday, March 12, at 4:30, in 
Room 25, Liberal Arts Building. — L. V. 
T. Simmons, secretary. 

o — — 

EDUCATION FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the fac- 
ulty of the School of Education on Mon- 
day, March 17, at 4:30, in Room 121, 
Old Main. — H. G. Parkinson, secretary. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 

Senior 
jRupehinsky, A. J. W., For 

Juniors 
Irvine, J. A., Ag 
Rowland, W. C„ CF 
Stick-man, Henrietta, ML 
Freshmen 
Burd, Harry R., AH 
Gager, F. Malcolm, EE 
Quimby, A. G, Jr., EE 
Rush, Jesse J. Z., Ag 
Wisnewski, W. B., PM 



LIBERAL ARTS LECTURE 

Tonight's lecture in the Liberal Arts 
series will be given by Dean C. W. 
Stoddart on "The Menace to Education", 
at 7:00, in Old Chapel. Next Tuesday's 
lecture will be given by Director R. W. 
Grant on "The Attributes of Music as 
an Art." This lecture will be given in 
the Foyer of the Auditorium. 



FREE CONCERT 

A free concert will be given under 
the auspices of the French Club on 
Wednesday evening, March 12, at 7:15 
in the Foyer of the Auditorium. 



CAMPAIGN RECEIPTS 

Campaign receipts for the past week 
were as follows: 

New York $1660 

(Massachusetts i 470 

Blair 354 

Payette , 270 

(Philadelphia 150 

JButler 100 

New Student 100 

{Texas 100 

jOrawford 75 

jMaryland , 75 

Berks 50 

(Clinton , 50 

(Perry 50 

|New Mexico , 25 

[Bradford 15 

Illinois 5 



TEACHING POSITIONS 

Arrangements have been made for 
graduate students, who are taking their 
advanced degrees this year, to enroll 
with the American Council of Educa- 
tion, Division of College and University 
Personnel. Pleads of departments 
should call the attention of graduate 
students who are interested in securing 
college teaching positions to this mat- 
ter. Blanks can be secured from the 
Dean of the Graduate -School, who will 
be glad to explain the matter more in 
detail to interested students. It should 
be borne in mind that only students 
taking their graduate degrees this year 
are eligible for enrollment. 



PENN STATE PLAYERS 

The Penn State Players will present 
as their anniversary production Gals- 
worthy's melodrama, "Loyalties", on 
March 28 and 29 in the Auditorium. 
This will lie the first presentation of 
"Loyalties" by amateurs in this coun- 
try; in fact the performance has never 
been given by an American company. 
Mr. Galsworthy himself gave the Play- 
ers permission to produce his play. 

Tickets for the performance will be 
fifty cents, seventy-five cents, and one 
dollar. Mail order blanks have been 
seiu to members of the faculty, and 
these will be filled upon receipt. The 
general sale of tickets will start Mon- 
day, March 24, at 7:00 p. m. at the 
iState Shirt iShop and will continue 
throughout the week. Additional mail 
order blanks may also be secured at 
the .Shirt Shop. 



ATTEND II. E. .CONFERENCE 

The Department of Home Economics 
was represented at the Seventh Annual 
Conference on Home Economics and 
Agriculture for the North Atlantic Re- 
gion called by the Federal Board for 
Vocational Education in Philadelphia 
last week by Miss Edith P. Chace, Miss 
iSarah M. Wilson, and Miss Louise G. 
Turner. Miss Chace discussed the top- 
ic, "Relation of the Home Economics 
Teacher to the Health Program." Miss 
Turner reported the results of a ques- 
tionnaire which was sent out by the 
Department of Home Economics on 
"Vocational Experience as a Part of the 
Teacher Training Curriculum." 



Total 



- $3549 



AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY 

The Council of the American Chem- 
ical iS-ociety at a recent meeting voted 
to establish a local section at State 
College, comprising the counties of Cen- 
tre, Clearfield, Clinton, Union, Mifflin, 
Huntingdon, Lycoming, and Blair. An 
organization meeting has been called for 
Wednesday, March 12, at 7:30, in the 
Amphitheatre, Chemistry Annex. 



CALENDAR 

TUESDAY, March 11 

Liberal Arts lecture, Dean Stoddart. 
7:00, Old Chapel. 

WEDNESDAY, March 12 

Liberal Arts faculty meeting, 4:3,0, 25 
L. A. 

SATURDAY, March 15 

Athletic events — Penn State vs. V. M. 
I., boxing; Syracuse, basketball; Penn 
iState Freshmen vs. Franklin and Mar- 
shall Academy, boxing; Hollidaysburg 
Y. M. C. A., wrestling. 

University Club. Dean Holbrook will 
speak; "Travelling off the Beaten 
Paths", 8:15. 

SUNDAY, March 10 

Chapel Speaker — Dr. William L. Saw- 
tclle, First Presbyterian Church, Scran- 
ton, Pa. 

MONDAY, March 17 

School of Education faculty, 4:30, 121 
Old Main. 

NEW BOOK BY DR. CROCKETT 

"A Satchel Guide to Europe", by W. 
J. Rolfe and W. D. Crockett, has just 
been announced by a New York pub- 
lishing house, this being the forty- 
fourth edition of the volume, thorough- 
ly revised and brought up to date. Mr. 
Rolfe is deceased, so that the revised 
guide-book is almost entirely the 'work 
of Professor Crockett of the Classical 
Languages department. 

Professor Crockett spent all of last 
year in Europe, with Rome as his head- 
quarters. The book, which was last 
published to 1914, is more than twice 
the former size due largely to the 
World War. It meets the demands of 
both the rapid and the leisurely tourist 
and ,is so interesting to read that one 
forgets it is a guide-book. 



TALKS ON MINE SAFETY 

Dean Holbrook of the School of Mines 
attended an international conference of 
British and American engineers in Pitts- 
burgh last week, the conference being 
called by the U. S. Bureau of Mines for 
the purpose of outlining a research and 
investigation program in which the U. 
IS. Bureau of Mines and the British Go- 
vernment Department of Mines may act 
cooperatively. Dean Holbrook address- 
ed the conference on the subject "The 
Personal Element in Mine Safety." 



ATTENDS MEETINGS 

Miss Edith P. Chace, of the Depart- 
ment of Home Economics, attended the 
meetings of the Department of Super- 
intendence of the N. E. A. in Chicago 
recently. On her way to Chicago she 
addressed the Allegheny County home 
economics teachers on the subject, 
"New Emphasis in Home Economics." 






Published every Tuesday 
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Items of interest to the facul- 
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er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



/OLUME 3 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



COLLEGE SENATE 

The regular meeting 1 of the College 
Senate will be held on TI ursday eve- 
ning', March 20, at 7:30 in the Foyer 
f the Auditorium. 



AGRICULTURAL FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the fac- 
ilty of the School of Agriculture on 
rhursday, March 20, at 4:30, in Foom 
03, Agricultural Building — R. L. 
Vatts, Dean. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
tudents have left college: 

Sophomore 

Balthauser, George W., Hrt. 

Freshmen 
Culbertson, J. F., EE. 
Curnow, H. R., OF. 
Offner, Leon, TT. 

Special 

Landis, William B., Ag. 



STUDENTS DROPPED 

The following students have been 
dropped from college: 
3 Duncan, Elizabeth, VHE. 

1 Kowalewski, Helen, LA. 

2 Mahle, Alberta, TT. 

2 Wilson, Donna M., TT. 



STUDENTS REINSTATED 

The following students have been 
reinstated in the Probation Section: 
3 Duncan, Elizabeth. 
2 Wilson, Donna M. 



A. A. A. S. ELECTIONS 

The following officers have been 
chosen for the calendar year by the 

[State College Branch of the American 

'Association for the Advancement of 

'Science: 

Chairman, Dr. D. F. McFarland; vice- 

| chairman, Professor R. A. Dutcher; 
treasurer, Mi's. Pauline Beery Mack; 

(executive committee, Miss Edith P. 

J £hace and Professor J. A. Ferguson. 
The office of secretary is a four-year 

) office and does not expire until next 

1 year, Professor J. Ben Hill being the 

j present incumbent. 



LIBERAL ARTS LECTURE 

Tonight's lecture in the Liberal Arts 
series will be given by Director Rich- 
ard W. Grant on the subject "The At- 
tributes of Music as an Art," at 7:00, 
in the Foyer of the Auditorium. Next 
Tuesday's speaker will be Professor 
C. A. Bonine, his subject being "Vol- 
canoes and Earthquakes." 



State College, Pa., March 18, 1924 



TECHNICAL DEGREES 

The following changes in the re- 
qr rements for the granting of tech- 
nical degrees were passed by the Col- 
lege Senate at its last meeting: 

1. The present requirement for the 
technical degree (as A.E., C.E., E.M.. 
etc.) is based on the completion of 
three years of professional work, and 
on the presentation of a satisfactory 
thesis. To give proper recognition of 
the professional standards represented 
by these degrees, certain additional re- 
quirements have been added. 

2. Not less than three years shall 
have elapsed from the time of receiv- 
ing his first degree in engineering be- 
fore a graduate of this institution shall 
be permitted to file his application for 
a technical degree. 

3. A technical degree (as A.E., C.E., 
E.M., etc.) may also be granted to an 
engineer of approved practical exper- 
ience who is a graduate in engineering 
of another institution of equal rank, 
on completion of at least three years 
of full-time teaching of, or research 
work in, engineering in a professorial 
grade in this institution, and upon the 
presentation of an acceptable thesis 
and the fulfillment of all the other re- 
quirements for technical degrees. 

4. Each application for a technical 
degree shall include evidence of a sat- 
isfactory professional record which 
must be approved by the executive 
committee of the school to which it i? 
referred by the Dean of the Graduate 
School, before the application will be 
formally accepted by the Graduate 
School. 

5. The statement of the Graduate 
School Announcement under "Thesis" 
shall be revised to read as follows: 

THESIS — This shall correspond in 
Co -m to the Master's thesis described 
above. Immediately following regis- 
tration, the candidate must submit for 
approval an outline of his proposed 
thesis, and at least six weeks prior 
to the day on which the degree is to 
be conferred, two copies (one original 
and one carbon) of the completed the- 
sis must be in the office of the Dean 
of the Graduate School. The thesis, 
properly approved by the head of the 
department concerned, shall be filed 
with the Dean of the Graduate School 
at least two weeks before the day on 
which his degree is to be conferred. 
The candidate may be required to ap- 
pear in person to defend his thesis. 

o 

ENTERTAINMENT COURSE 

The seventh number of the T. M. C. 
A. and Department of Music entertain- 
ment course will be given in the Au- 
ditorium on Saturday evening of this 
week at S:00. Marie Sundelius, famous 
Swedish-American prima donna, is 
considered to be one of the leading 
attractions of the year. 

Tickets for the concert can be se- 
cured at the Y. M. C. A. Hut, or at 
the box office. The price is $1.50. 



NUMBER 25 



CALENDAR 



TUESDAY, March 18 
Liberal Arts lecture, Director Grant, 
7:00, Foyer of Auditorium. 
THURSDAY, March 20 

Agricultural faculty meeting, 4:30, 

103 Ag. 
College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Audi- 
torium. 

FRIDAY, March 21 

Penn State Players, at University Club, 

8:15. Members and partners. 

SATURDAY, March 22 

Intercollegiate Boxing Tournament. 
Preliminaries, 2:00; Finals, 7:00. 
Penn State, Navy, Penn and Syra- 
cuse. 

Marie Sundelius, concert, Auditorium, 
8:00. 

SUNDAY, March 23 

Chapel Speaker — The Right Reverend 
John C. Ward, D. D„ of Erie, Pa. 



ENGINEERING GRADUATES 

The Registrar has just completed a 
tabulation showing the number of 
Bachelor degrees in engineering sub- 
jects conferred in Pennsylvania dur- 
ing the college year 1922-23. This in- 
cludes graduates of Bucknell, 'Carnegie 
Tech, Lehigh, Lafayette, University of 
Pennsylvania, University of Pitts- 
burgh and Penn State. 

The tabulation included the course 
i/i Industrial Chemistry at Penn State 
as this corresponds to Chemical Engi- 
neering at the other institutions. A 
total of 785 engineering degrees were 
granted, and of that number Penn 
State had 258, or practically one-third. 
The combined graduates of the other 
institutions totaled 527, so that Penn 
State graduated practically half as 
many as all of the others combined. 
This college was the only one to give 
degrees in Milling Engineering, Elec- 
trochemical Engineering, Railway Me- 
chanical Engineering, and Architec- 
tural Engineering. 

The totals by colleges were as fol- 
lows: Penn State 258; Carnegie Tech 
120; Lehigh 108; Penn 107; Pitt 91; 
Bucknell 62; and Lafayette 39. 

o 

CAMPAIGN RECEIPTS 

Campaign receipts for the past week 
were as follows: 

New Jersey $750 

New Student 100 

Schuylkill 100 

Western New York 100 

Franklin 78 

Allegheny 50 

Faculty 25 

Lackawanna 25 

Lycoming 10 

Beaver 7 

Elk 2 

Total $1247 



w.D.CROCKLTT . 
313 MAIN BLPG. 



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Items of Interest to the facul- 
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The P 



nnsylvania State 



ege 



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G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
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KLUME 3 



State College, Pa., March 25, 1924 



NUMBER 26 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

BELOW GRADE REPORTS 

Below grade reports, due at the end 
y{ the first eight weeks of the present 
semester, aire due at the office of the 
ians as of March 22.— W. S. Hoffman. 

Registrar. 



BELOW GRADES FOR WOMEN 

All instructors reporting below grades 
or women students at the end. of eighi 
weeks are requested to send a copy of 
hese below grades to Miss Ray, Dean 
jf Women. 



ENGINEERING FACULTY 

A meeting of the School of Engineer - 
ng faculty to consider low grades is 
:alled for Wednesday, April 2, at 3:30 
n Room 200, Engineering D — C. L 
iHnsloe, secretary. 



NUMERICAL GRADES 

At its meeting last week, the College 
Senate voted that beginning with the 
present semester all student grades be 
■sported by the Registrar in numbers 
ind not by the .letters A, B, C, D, and E. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 
Sophomores 
Ritts, Orne L., ME 
'Sensenieh, Chester, IE 



LIBERAL ARTS LECTURE 

Tonight's lecture in the Liberal Arts 
jeries will be given by Professor C. A. 
3onine at 7:00 in the Old Chapel. The 
subject will be "Volcanoes and Earth- 
uiakes". Professor Bonine changed 
lates with Dr. Crocket who was origin- 
lily scheduled for tonight. Next week's 
eoture will be by Dr. O. F. Boucke on 
Aspect's of Federal Finance in 1924". 



HONORED WITH OFFICE 

At the eighth annual convention of 
Eastern Music Supervisors held at 
Rochester, New York, recently, Direc- 
or Richard W. Grant of the Depart- 
nent of Music was elected president 
>f the association, which has a mem- 
bership of between seven and eight 
bndred. Director Grant is a charter 
neimber of the organization. 



UNIVERSITY CLUB 

Ladies' Night will be celebrated at the 

[University Club on Friday, March 28, 

nth dinner, dancing and cards. Reser- 

ations for dinner must be made with 

St. Clayton not later than Wednesday. 



PENNA'S POPULATION 

The Bulletin is in receipt of an inter- 
esting contribution dealing with the dis- 
tribution of population in Pennsylvania. 
It brings out some unusual angles of 
the problem, as follows: 

Of the 8,720,017 people of Pennsyl- 
vania, more than one-fourth live in the 
small triangular area around. Philadel- 
phia formed by the four counties of 
(Philadelphia, Delaware, Chester, and 
Montgomery. The area of this triangle 
is 1579 square miles, which is but one- 
thirtieth of the area of the entire state. 

If a line be run from the town of 
Montgomery in Lycoming county to the 
northeastern corner of the state, and if 
the Susquehanna river from Montgom- 
ery to Harrisburg is used as a western 
boundary, and if this line be run south 
from Harrisburg to the Maryland line, 
approximately 18 additional counties will 
be cut off, comprising another fourth of 
.he population. This area covers about 
22 per cent of the state. 

One-half of the population of Penn- 
sylvania, therefore, lives in these two 
districts which have a combined area 
of only one-fourth of the state. 

In the western part of the state, if a 
line be drawn, around the seven counties 
of Allegheny, Beaver, Washington, Fay- 
ette, Greene, Westmoreland, and. Cam- 
bria, another fourth of the population 
will 'be found within this area, which is 
less than one-eighth of the state. 

The remaining fourth of the people 
of Pennsylvania occupy the other 38 
counties, which comprise an area of 
more than three-fifths of the state. 



PENN STATE PLAYERS 

Galsworthy's melodrama "Loyalties" 
will be presented in the Auditorium on 
Friday and Saturday nights of this week 
by rhe Penn .State Players under the di- 
rection ctf Professor A. C. Cloetingh. 
"Loyalties" will be the anniversary of- 
fering of the Players and it is being 
hailed as the best play of the year. The 
performances will begin at 8:15. 

Tickets were placed on sale at the 
Shirt Shop starting last night and they 
will be on sale all this week and at the 
box office on the nights of the perform- 
ances. Prices are fifty cents, seventy- 
five cents, and one dollar. 



SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT 

On the reverse side of this week's Bul- 
letin will be found a complete summary 
of enrollment by schools, classes, and 
courses for the present semester, exclud- 
ing special students. It shows that the 
total numeer of students now in college 
numbers 3017, divided as follows: Seni- 
ors, 543; Juniors, 656; (Sophomores, 815; 
Freshmen, 919; and Two-Year Ags 84. 

The School of Engineering leads with 
1054 students, Liberal Arts is second 
with 629, and Agriculture third with 550. 



CALENDAR 



TUESDAY, March 25 
Liberal Arts lecture, Professor Bonine 
7:00, Old Chapel. 

FRIDAY, March 28 
Ladies Night at the University Club. 
Penn State Players, 8:15, Auditorium. 
Intel-scholastic basketball semi-finals 
7 : 00, Armory. 

SATURDAY, March 29 
Interseholastic basketball finals. 
Penn State Players, 8:15, Auditorium. 

SUNDAY, March 29 
Chapel Speaker — Dr. Fraser Metzger. 

TUESDAY, April 1 
Liberal Arts lecture, Dr. Boucke, 7:00, 
Old Chapel. 



THESPIAN TICKETS 

Faculty members may make reser- 
vations for tickets to "The Magazine 
Cover Girl", the annual Thespian pro- 
duction, by notifying J. M. Lee, at the 
S. A. E. house. The performance will 
')■■ given in the Auditorium on Satur- 
day evening, April 5, at 7:00. Due to 
complaints by faculty members who 
were unable to secure tickets in pre- 
vious years, the general sale will not be 
held until Thursday night of this week, 
thus giving the faculty opportunity to 
the price seats desired. 

Tickets will be $.75, $1.00, $1.50, and 
$2.00 and faculty members should state 
the roe seats desired. 

o 

INSTITUTIONAL DINNER 

The catering class of the Home Eco- 
nomics department will hold an open 
dinner in the "Women's Building at 5:45 
p.m. on Monday, March 31. Either one 
dollar or seventy-five cent dinners may 
lie ordered. Anyone wishing to reserve a 
rlace or a table for a special party 
please notify the Home Economics of- 
fice by Wednesday, March 26. 

— o 

CAMPAIGN RECEIPTS 

(Campaign receipts for the past week 
were as follows: 

New Jersey $3970 

Chester 544 

New York 260 

Erie 207 

Philadelphia , 200 

Crawford 150 

Bedford . 100 

Greene 100 

Cameron 60 

Jefferson 25 

Bucks - 

Total $5621 

o 

OMICRON NU 
Anyone knowing of a member of Omi- 
cron Nu living in State College is re- 
quested to get in touch with Miss Day 
at Hillcrest as soon as possible. 



Present Enrollment by Schools and Classes 
for Second Semester 



itf, 



Senior Junior 


Soph. 


Fresh. 2-Year 


Total 


School of Agriculture 










Agro. 


7 


8 


8 






A. H. 


25 


14 


15 






Bot. 


1 


1 








Ch. Ag. 


10 


12 


13 






D. H. 


27 


33 


36 






For. 


5 


8 


10 


13 




Hort. 


25 


22 


16 






L. Arch. 


6 


1 


16 


9 




P. H. 


4 


4 


7 






Agric. 






6 


104 




First Year 








43 




Second Year 








41 




Total 


110 


103 


127 


126 84 


550 


School of Education 










Ag. Ed. 


18 


19 


14 


15 




Home Econ. 


11 


18 


14 


15 




Teach. Train. 


33 


43 


37 


52 




V. H. E. 


14 


16 


23 


23 




Total 


76 


96 


88 


105 


365 


School of Engineering 










A. Eng. 


10 


6 


20 


24 




Arch. 




7 


8 


7 




C. E. 


24 


35 


57 


73 




Ech. E. 


9 


8 


13 


16 




E. E. 


69 


73 


90 


116 




I. E. 


25 


24 


38 


50 




I. E. (Lum. Opt.)3 


12 


8 


1 




M. E. 


33 


46 


52 


71 




Mllg. 


1 


1 




3 




R. M. E. 


2 


3 


5 


5 




S. E. 


3 


2 


1 






Total 


179 


217 


292 


366 


1054 


School of Liberal Arts 










Arts & Lette 


rs 44 


50 


39 


62 




C. & F. 


65 


88 


118 


83 




Pre-Legal 




12 


37 


31 




Total 


109 


150 


194 


176 


629 


School of Mines 












Cer. 








3 




Met. 


15 


10 


13 


12 




Mining 


10 


21 


27 


37 




Mng. Geol. 


5 


3 


5 


5 




Total 


30 


34 


45 


57 


166 


School of Natural Science 










Chem. 


7 


IS 


6 


33 




Ind. Chem. 


18 


16 


23 






N. S. 


4 


6 


3 


3 




Phys. 


2 


2 


1 


1 




Pre-Medical 


8 


17 


36 


52 




Total 


39 


56 


69 


89 


253 



GRAND TOTAL 543 656 815 919 84 

Note: This report does not include special students. 



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,UME 3 



State College, Pa., April 1, 1924 



NUMBER 27 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

SENATE COMMITTEES 

Hie attention of c.iairmen of standing 
nmittees of the Senate is called to 
tide II, Section 4 of the By-Laws, 
|ch states the duty of each standing 
mmittee "at the May meeting of the 
liege Senate to make a written report 

duplicate summarizing its activities 
ring the current college year." — John 

Thomas. , 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
tfdents have left college: 

Freshmen 
ffibraczinskas, Even A., Ag 
Fleck, Martin Wj., CE 
Hill, Joel R., Mng 
Homan, Forest F., AEd 



COMMENCEMENT COMMITTEE 

M accordance with the action of the 
Jllege Senate of February 23, 1024, 
thorising the appointment of a com- 
ttee to consider the recommendations 

the Committee on Student Welfare 
,ide to the Senate on the above date 
d other matters relating to the Com- 
ancemeni program, the following corn- 
ttee is hereby appointed: 
Reproueiitiitg- the College Senate; 
ofessors S. W. Fletcher, L. V. T. Sim- 
>ns, C. L. Kinsloe, W ,S. Dye, Jr., and 

S. Hurrell. 
Representing' the Alumni: Messrs. R. 

Smith, '05; E. N. Sullivan, '14; B.. 

imsser, '94; E. W. Nick, '07; and 
R. Oehrle, '16. 
Representing- tlie Students: Messrs. 

"V. Bander, R. F. Mears, W. G. Wie- 
d, M. E. Mitchell, and R E. Long-acre. 
Dr. Fletcher will serve as convener of 
committee. — John M. Thomas, Presi- 
nt. 



REGISTRAR ON TRIP 

William S. Hoffman, Registrar of the 
Uege, left here on Friday to attend 

twelfth annual meeting of the Ameri- 
a Association of Collegiate Registrars 

Chicago. Enroute, he will visit the 
gistrar's offices at Carnegie Institute 
Technology, University of Pittsburgh, 
rthwestern University, University of 
icago, Ohio State University, Purdue 
iversity and the University of Illi- 



LIBERAL ARTS LECTURE 

tonight's lecture in the Liberal Arts 
ies will be given by Dr. O. F. Boucke, 

'Aspects of Federal Finance in 1924", 
7:30 in Old Chapel. Next Tuesday's 
cure, the final one of the series, will 

iven by Dr. W. D. Crockett, his sub- 
t being "On the Road to Carcas- 
ne." 



SCHOLARSHIP DAY 

Scholarship Day exercises for this 
semester will be held on Tuesday, April 
8, at 11:20 a. m„ in the Auditorium. Dr. 
Josiah H. Penniman, President of the 
University of Pennsylvania, will be the 
speaker of the occasion and the pro- 
gram will include the announcements of 
elections to the various honor societies, 
the award of the President Sparks 
medal, and musical selections. 

A large representation of the faculty 
is desired and it is urged that they use 
their influence to secure as large an at- 
tendance of students as 'may be possible. 
Regular college classes will be suspend- 
ed during the fourth hour in the fore- 
noon because of the Scholarship Day 
exercises. 



CALENDAR 



PENN STATE RADIO NIGHT 

Announcement has been made that 

the night of Wednesday, April 9, will be 

Penn State Night at the college radio 

n, and Penn State 

alumni and friends all over the country 

been advised to tune in o-n * 
for that evening. President Thomas, 
Deans Watts, Sackett, Stoddart, and 
Holbrook, officers of the Alumni Associ- 
ation, and a. number of other faculty 
i will greet Penn Staters via radio 
on that evening. Music will be furn- 
ished by the Varsity Quartet, a mando- 
lin sextette, and other student musi- 
cians. The program is scheduled to run 
from 8:00 to 11:00. 



THESPIAN SHOW 

The annual production of the Thes- 
pians, "The Magazine Cover Girl", will 
toe given in the Auditorium next Sat- 
urday evening, April 5, at 8:15. The 
play was written by R. B. Voskamp, a 
member of the Junior class, with music 
by Hummel Fishburn, H. E. Schlosser, 
and D. L. Auchenbach. It is reported 
to be the best Thespian show in years. 
Tickets will be on sale tonight at the 
Co-op, and on Saturday night at the 
box office. 



SILVER BAT CONFERENCE 

The annual Y. II. C. A. summer con- 
ference at Silver Bay, Lake George, 
New York, comes this year between 
sessions, June 12 to 19. Members of the 
faculty who are interested in attending 
the conference are asked to see the Y. 
M. C. A. Secretary. 



FIRST BALL GAME 

The opening game of the Penn State 
ball season is scheduled for Satur- 
day, April 5, with Juniata College as the 
■:ion. If the weather man is kind 
this week, the game will probably be 
played, as the diamond will dry out 
rapidly. 



TUESDAY, April 1 
Liberal Arts lecture, Dr. Boucke, 7:00, 
old Chapel. 

WEDNESDAY, April 2 
Engineering faculty meeting, 3:30, 
Room 200, Eng. D. 

SATURDAY, April 5 
Baseball, Penn State vs. Juniata, New 
Beaver. 

Thespians, 8:15, Auditorium, 
SUNDAY, April 6 
Chapel Speaker — Dr. Charles Foster 
Kent, of New Haven, Conn. 

TUESDAY, April 8 
Scholarship Day exercises, 11:20 a. m., 
Auditorium. 

WHEN IN PITTSBURGH— 

Faculty members of any Penn State 
school who have business in Pitts- 
burgh at any time and who feel that 
e a worth-while message for 
the general public that might be given 
as a radio talk, are asked to get in 
with D. M. Cresswell, 223 Old Main, 
nts can be made to schedule 
.such speakers on programs of the IvDKA 
radiophone station from the studio at 
:hc plant of the National Stockman and 
Farmer. Notice of such appearances 
e given the Pittsburgh authori- 
ties at least ten days or two weeks in 
advance. 



o 

SUMMER COMMENCEMENT 
n or the first time in its history, the 
college will hold commencement exer- 
at the close of the Summer Ses- 
sion this year, according to action of 
the trustees taken at a recent meeting. 
In previous years, regular students who 
completed their work during a Summer 
Session were forced to wait until the 
following Mid-Year Convocation to re- 
ceive their degrees. Under the new ar- 
ng:mient, the college will hold grad- 
uation exercises three times a year. 

o — 

CONSERVATION COUNCIL 
The annual meeting of the Pennsyl- 
\ ania :Si.ate Conservation Council will be 
held at State College on Friday and Sat- 
urday, May 23 and 24, according to an- 
nouncement by Professor J. A. Fergu- 
son, secretary of the council. 



CAMPAIGN RECEIPTS 
Campaign receipts for the past week 
were as follows: 

Warren $551 

Blair : __ 250 

New Jersey 216 

McKean 36 

Crawford 35 

Faculty 10 

Indiana (County) 2 

Total $1100 






3 13 :.' A I N BLDG 



* 



Published every Tuesday 
luring the college year as a 
neans of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
terns of interest to the facul- 



The Pennsylvania State College 



WLUME 3 



MF.H'».ltrjm RQ:EX3Xl.MUXi3XJTC'n: 7t 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



COLLEGE SENATE 

The April meeting of the College 
■ate, regularly scheduled for Thurs- 
iy, April 17, will not be held at that 
me 'because of the Easter recess. In- 
ead, the meeting will be held on Tues- 
ly evening, April 15, at 7:30 in the 
oyer oif the Auditorium. 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

There will be a meeting of the fac- 
lty of the School of Education on 
fonday, April 1-1, ati:30, in Room 121, 
Id Main — H. G. Parkinson, secretary. 

STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
tudents have left college: 

Juniors 
Kikendall. Clark, CE 
Markley, Marcus A., AH 

Freshmen 
Linton, Donald W., EE 
VanDine, Charles G., CE 



OX INSPECTION TRIPS 

A number of students will leave on 
lie annual spring inspection trips this 
?eek, including all Seniors in Engineer- 
fig, Junior Chemists and Industrial 
)hemists. Senior and Junior Metallurg- 
rts, and Junior Miners and Mining Geol- 
gists. 

All Engineers will leave April 9, to be 
'one until the opening of the Easter 
ecess. Junior Chemists and Industrial 
Chemists leave today for a similar 
leriod. 

Senior Metallurgists left lost Sunday, 
fhile the Junior Metallurgists leave 
omorrow -morning. Junior Miners and 
/lining Geologists will leave on Sunday, 
Lpril 13, and will not return until April 
8. The mining inspection trips in most 
ases run through the Easter holiday 
leriod. 

GLEE CLUB CONCERT 

Th-e Glee Club Concert, which is to he 
he final number of the Department of 
itusic and Y. M. C. A. entertainment 
•ourse, will be given on Saturday even- 
tig of this week instead of Friday even- 
ng as originally announced In the 
ourse program. Faculty members 
hould note this change. The concert 
jrilltoe given in the Auditorium at 8:15. 
j The Glee Club, under the direction of 
professor R. W. Grant, will be assisted 
y J. Sherman Schoonmaker, at the 
'iano, and Mrs. Irene Osborne Grant, 
t the organ. As an added feature of 
he program the Music department has 
©cured Miss Marguerite Schuilling, of 
few York, noted mezzo-soprano. 

Tickets for the concert can -be se- 
ured at the Y. M. C. A. Hut. 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



State College, Pa., April 8, 1924 

TO HEAD FRENCH INSTITUTE 
Announcement has been made toy the 
Summer Session authorities of the es- 
tablishment of an Institute of French 
Education as part of the coming (Sum- 
mer 'Session and of the appointment of 
Professor H. P. Williamson de Visme to 
take charge. 

-Professor de Visme is the founder of 
the famous French School at Middle- 
bury .College, attended each summer by 
over 200 students of the language, and 
Penn State is fortunate in securing his 
services. He will become a member of 
the permanent faculty of the college and 
during the regular college term will 
teach French in the Department of Ro- 
mance Languages, of which Professor I. 
L. Foster is the head. 



NUMBER 28 



ADMIRAL SIMS TO SPEAK 

Rear-Admiral William S. Sims win 
be the chief speaker at a student mass 
rveeting which will be held in the Au- 
ditorium on Thursday evening for the 
purpose of impressing on the students 
the importance of law enforcement 
and the observance of the Eighteenth 
Amendment. Admiral Sims will L ake 
for his suhject "The Undergraduate 
and the Eighteenth Amendment," an 
address that he has given before the 
student bodies of a number of othe" 
institutions. 

The meeting has been planned en- 
tirely by students, but faculty mem- 
bers who are interested are invited to 
attend. 



LIBERAL ARTS LECTURE 

Tonight's lecture in the Liberal Arts 
series will be the final one of the year. 
Dr. W. D. Crockett will be the speak- 
er, his subject being "On the Road to 
Carcassonne." It will be given in Old 
Chapel at 7:00. 

TO ADDRESS CONVENTION 

Professor R. U. Blasingame, of the 
Department of Farm Machinery, has 
been asked to speak at the National 
Sales Convention of the Delco Light 
Company, at Dayton, Ohio, this week. 
His -suhject will he "Relation -of Elec- 
tricity to Agriculture". 



NEW BOOK BY DR. DOTTERER 

The Macmillan Company has an- 
nounced the publication this month of a 
Mook by Dr. R. H. Dotterer, of the De- 
partment of Philosophy at Penn State. 
The title of the book is "Beginners' 
Logic". 

o 

SCHOLARSHIP DAY 

Scholarship Day exercises will be 
held at 11:20 this (Tuesday) morning 
in the Auditorium, all classes being 
suspended for that hour. Dr. Josiah 
H Penniman, President of the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, will be the speak- 
er. 



CALENDAR 



TUESDAY, April 8 
Liberal Arts lecture, Dr. Crockett, 
7:00, Old Chapel. 

WEDNESDAY, April 9 
Penn State Radio Night, 8:00 to 11:00. 

SATURDAY, April 12 
Base/ball, Penn State vs. Susquehanna, 
2:30. New Beaver. 

G-lee Club Concert, 8:15, Auditorium. 

SUNDAY, April 18 
No chapel speaker. A program of 
Easter -music has been arranged. 
MONDAY, April II 
Education faculty meeting, 4:30, 121 
Old Main. 

TUESDAY, April 15 
College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Audi- 
torium. 

WEDNESDAY, April Hi 
Easter recess begins, 5:20 p. m. 

PENN -STATE ON THE AIR 
Preparations have been completed for 
the first Penn State Radio Night at 
the college broadcasting station tornor 
row evening from 8:00 to 11:00, Eastern 
Standard Time. Alumni elulbs in many 
cities -and towns all over the United 
States have arranged to gather tomor- 
row night to "listen in" en the pro- 
gram that will be of special interest to 
them. President Thomas, Dr. Sparks, 
and many other faculty people will have 
'brief messages to "put on the air", 
Penn State songs and yells, and music 
by the various student musical organi- 
zations will complete a 100 per cent 
Penn State program from W P A B. 



-o- 



DR. KERN ON LEAVE 

At a recent meeting of the execu- 
tive committee of the Board of Trus- 
tees, a brief leave of absence was 
granted to Dr. F. D. Kern, dean of the 
Graduate School and Professor of Bot- 
any, in order that he might accept 
an invitation from the Porto Rican 
government to study and collect fungi 
there during the coming summer. 

Dr. Kern received the invitation 
from the Commissioner of Agriculture 
and Labor, and it comes as a tribute 
to his attainments as a student of 
parasitic fungi. For many years Dr. 
Kern has conducted researches alo-g 
these lines and he is an acknowledged 
authority on the subject. 

He plans to leave here just before 
Commencement to be gone about two 
months. In his ahsence, Dr. E. W. 
Eunkle, secretary of the Graduate 
School, will have charge of graduate 
enrollment for the Summer Session. 



CAMPAIGN RECEIPTS 

Campaign receipts for the past week 
amounted to $1,113. 



:: . P 



313 KA1 



CKOCr^'T . 

ELD' • 



fj 



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during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
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items of interest to the facul- 
ty 



The Pennsylvania State College 



Contributions must be aa 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
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VOLUME 3 

OFFICIAL NOTICES 

COLLEGE SENATE 

The April meeting of the College Sen- 
ate will be held this (Tuesday) evening, 
at 7:30, in the Foyer of the Auditorium, 
instead of the regular Thursday even- 
ing data which comes during the Easter 
recess. 

— o 

THE EASTER RECESS 

The Easter recess begins Wednesday. 
April 16, at 5:20 p. m., and ends at 8:00 
a. m., on Thursday, April 24. 

Students absent without official ex- 
cuse on the last day before or the first 
lay after vacation should be barred 
from classes by their instructors until 
they have paid the five dollar fine and 
•eceiced a re-admission permit. 

By Council cif Administration action, 
instructors are forbidden to change 
he regular schedule of classes before 
ind after vacation. In case of practi- 
:um subjects, however, where the prac- 
tice is to excuse students when the day's 
issignment is completed, ths same prac- 
ice may be followed at vacation peri- 
ls. — A. R. Warnock, Dean of Men. 



State College, Pa., April 15, 1924 



NUMBER 29 



STUDENTS DROPPED 

The following- students have been 
trapped permanently from the schools 
ndicated: 

3 Chamberlain, Alan C, EE 

2 Church, CharlesR., ME 

4 Duey, Carl W., ME 

3 Galbreath, Joseph W., EE 
3 John, David R., EE 

3 Krumrine, George D., CE 
3 Meller, Carl B., RME 

3 Rainey, Ross M., IE 

4 Rugh, Kenneth A., PM 
2 Slagle, Cladius D., ME 

The following student has been 
ropped under the fifty per cent rule: 
1 Trimble, James R., Met 
The following student has been 
'Topped from college for unsatisfactory 
cholarship: 

4 Resides, Frank E., IE 

TO STUDY HIGHWAYS 

Professor J. E. Kaulfuss, of the De - 
artment of Civil Engineering, will 
lake a study of highway conditions in 
-'*nois, Indiana, Ohio, and Pennsyl- 
ania during the Easter vacation per- 
% starting in his car from Chicago 
nd driving to State College through 
idianapolis, Columbus, and Pitts- 
^rgh. He expects to leave Chicago on 
riday of this week and to make the 
stance of about 750 miles in three 
iys or less. 

In connection with the trip, Profess ■ 
Kaulfuss has expressed a willing- 
?ss to bring back with him any Penn 
ate faculty member who might be in 
ncago and who would be returning 
that time. 



FATHERS' DAY 

The fourth annual celebration of 
Fathers' Day has been set for May 3 
and special efforts are toeing exerted to 
make this year's gathering the best 
ever. To this end, President Thomas 
has just sent a letter to the fathers of 
all Perm .State students extending to 
them a cordial invitation to visit the 
college on that occasion. 

A full program for the entertainment 
of the fathers is being arranged, in- 
cluding general smokers, on Friday 
night; five different athletic contests, 
on Saturday; a mass meeting, and get- 
together in the Armory, on Saturday 
night; and special chapel exercises at 
which President Thomas will speak, on 
Sunday. 

Almost a thousand fathers have al- 
ready joined the association of "Parents 
of Penn State", or the "Pops" as they 
are called, and many more will have 
opportunity to enroll this year. It is to 
the interests of the college that the 
fathers be kept in as close touch with the 
services being rendered by Penn State 
as is possible, and Fathers' Day is the 
greatest help in that direction. 

Faculty members can 'aid in making 
this day a success by personally inter- 
esting themselves in the fathers of the 
students with whom they are in inti- 
mate contact. It is this personal inter- 
est that makes the "Dads" enjoy their 
visit and cements their loyalty to Penn 
State. 



CALENDAR 



-0- 



A I) DRiESS'ES MEETING 
Professor J. B. Shaw, of the Deport- 
ment of Ceramics, was a speaker at a 
section meeting of the .American Re- 
fractories Association held in Altoona 
last week. The subject of his address 
was "The Ceramic Industry in Penn- 
sylvania." 



TO REPRESENT PENN STATE 
Miss L. V. T. Simmons, head of the 
Department of German, has been nam- 
ed to represent the college at the ninth 
annual convention of the American 
Association of University Women 
which will be held in Washington, D. 
C, on April 21 to 25. 

o 

CAMPAIGN RECEIPTS 

Campaign receipts for the past week 
were as follows: 

Massachusetts $ 986 

Crawford 500 

Centre 230 

Connecticut 100 

Greene 100 

Allegheny 50 

Wayne 50 

Philadelphia 35 

Total $2051 



TUESDAY, April 15 
College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Audi- 
torium. 

WEDNESDAY, April 18 
Easter recess begins, 5:20 p. m. 

SUNDAY, April 20 
Easter Day, no chapel. 

THURSDAY, April 24 
Easter recess ends, 8:00 a. m. 

FRIDAY, April 25 
Dadies' Night at University Club. 

SATURDAY, April 26 
Baseball, Penn State vs. Boston Col- 
lege, New Beaver, 2:30. 

SUNDAY. April 27 
Chapel Speaker — Dr. Alexander Mac- 
Coll, Second Presbyterian Church, 
Philadelphia. 

THIRD ANNIVERSARY 

Today. April 15, marks the third an- 
niversary of the arrival of Dr. Thomas 
upon the Penn State campus to take 
u.i his duties as president. The three 
years have been most progressive ones 
for the college, and in working for the 
advancement of Penn State, President 
Thomas has been tireless. The BUiL- 
IETIN voices the congratulations of 
the faculty to Dr. Thomas on what 
has already been accomplished and 
pledges the loyalty and cooperation of 
all in making the future ever brighter. 



HONOR STUDENTS 

The elections to honor societies an 
ncunced at the Scholarship Day exer- 
cises last week show some interesting 
facts which have heen compiled by 
Dean Warnock, 

A disproportionate number of hon- 
ors have apparently gone to students 
coming from the smaller communities of 
the state. Jersey Shore has the best 
record with three of its students mak- 
ing Phi Kappa Phi. Pittsburgh is next 
with two honor men. 

Twenty-eight of the 64 men students 
winning honors belong to national 
and local social fraternities. Delta Sig- 
ma Phi and Kappa Delta Rho lead 
with three each. Alpha Zeta, profes- 
sional agricultural, has seven. 

'Watts Hall has six honor men and 
Old Main dormitory has three, but Old 
Main has the distinction of having the 
winner of the President Sparks Prize 
for the student having the highest av- 
erage in the college. 



NEXT BULLETIN APRIL 29 

Due to the Easter vacation period 
there will be no Faculty Bulletin pub- 
lished next Tuesday, April 22. The next 
issue of the Bulletin will be under date 
of April 29. 



2 L n G 



3 ] ;: .' : 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
Iteir 3 of interest to the facul- 
ty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G, W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M each Saturday 



VOLUME 3 



State College, Pa., April 29, 1924 



NUMBER 30 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

FATHERS' DAY 

Penn State will celebrate its fourth 
annual Fathers' Day on Saturday. An 
effort has been made this year to get 
the fathers here in large numbers. Th.- 
students are arranging an excellent 
program for the entertainment of the 
visitors. It remains for the faculty to 
do their part in making the "Dads" 
feel a warm welcome to the campus. 
This can best be done by making a 
personal effort to meet the fathers of 
students with whom you are in most 
intimate contact. 

I am sure that you will Willingly 
cooperate in making this Fathers' Day 
one that the parents will long remem- 
ber and one that will everlastingly 
cen nt their friendship and loyalty to 
Per . State. 

JOHN M. THOMAS. 



TO GRANT Ph. D. DEGREE 

At a meeting during the Easter hol- 
idays, the executive committee of the 
Board of Trustees approved the recom- 
mendation of the College Senate for 
the granting of the degree of Doctor 
I of ' hilosophy and sanctioned the re- 
[qui ements as drawn up by the faculty 
of the Graduate School. These will be 
given in a later edition of the Bulletin. 
The enrollment of candidates for the 
iPh. D. degree will start immediately 
for the opening of the fall term next 
September. 

o 



"COLLEGE PRESS" 



/ 



i The College Senate at its last meet- 
ing approved a recommendation of the 
iSenate Committee on Publications 
; which was as follows: 

"That the Senate recommend to the 
Board of Trustees the allotment in the 
budget of a modest sum of money with 
which to begin a series of publications 
of a learned and research character 
I under the title of 'The Pennsylvania 
I State College Studies' or 'The Penn- 
sylvania State College* Press'." 
1 The executive committee of the 
trustees at its meeting last week 
j thought favorably of the project and 
left it to the President and the Comp- 
troller to determine the feasibility of 
allotting the necessary funds. 

PHI BETA KAPPA 

I The spring meeting of the State Col- 
lege Association of Phi Beta Kappa will 
be held at the Centre Hills Country Club 
Ion Monday evening, May 5, at 7:30. Dr. 
|Thomas F. Crane, foirmerly dean of Cor- 
nell University, will speak on "Economy 
jbf Time in Study". 

Any Phi Beta Kappa members of the 
faculty Who are not yet members of the 
local association should communicate 
with the secretary, Professor T. E. Gtra- 

catt. 



JOIN THE "POPS" 

On the faculty there are now 15 or 
20 persons eligible to membership who 
have not yet joined the Parents' As- 
sociation; and nearly a hundred grad- 
uates of Penn State, whose parents 
are not members. Attention is also 
called to the fact that the "parents of 
future students" are also eligible to 
membership. Those who wish to join 
the "Pops," or who will try to induce 
their parents to join, can secure all 
necessary information from M.-S. Mc- 
Dowell, the secretary-treasurer of the 
Association, or from A. H. Espen- 
shade. 

o 

PINAFORE 

The presentation by the Music de- 
partment of Gilbert and Sullivan's com- 
ic opera "Pinafore" in the Auditorium 
on Thursday evening, May 8, will mark 
an important step forward in the 
growth and development of music at 
Penn State. No pains or expense are 
being spared to make the venture meet 
with complete success. 

Director Richard W. Grant will have 
general charge of the production and 
will direct all vocal work. He has se- 
cured Mr. Maurice Darey of the Way- 
burn Studios to take charge of the 
dancing and staging. Mr. Darcy is the 
man who was responsible for the ex- 
cellent Thespian show. Professor A. 
C. Cloetingh will design and supervise 
all scenic effects. 

"Pinafore" will be the main event of 
Penn State's contribution to National 
Music Week. The proceeds of the op- 
era will be added to the fund for the 
purchase of new pianos for the Audi- 
torium. 

There will be an advanced sale of 
reserved seat tickets at the Co-op to- 
night, (Tuesday), at 7:00. 

— o- 

TO SPEAK TO WOMEN 

Dr. Edith Hale Swift, of the American 
iSocial Hygiene Association, will speak 
to women students in Old Chapel today 
(Tuesday) at 2i30; and W. edne,sda y at 
4:30 and 6:45. Women faculty members 
and wives of faculty members are in- 
vited. 

O' 

CAMPAIGN RECEIPTS 

The following contributions have been 

received since the publication of the 
last Bulletin: 

Massachusetts $2660 

New York 990 

Butler ! - 500 

Erie 8° 

Faculty 80 

Allegheny > 75 

Philadelphia 50 

Bucks 30 

Ohio 30 

Chester 25 

Wayne 1 — 25 

$4545 



CALENDAR 



TUESDAY, April 29 

American Association of University 
Professors, final meeting, 7:30, Uni- 
versity Club. 

WEDNESDAY, April SO 

Spanish Club, 7:30, Old Chapel. 
FRIDAY, May 2 

Baseball, Penn State vs. Georgia 
Tech, 4:20, New- Beaver; Syracuse 
Freshmen, 4:20, Old Beaver. 

Fathers' Mass Meeting, 7:00. Audi- 
torium. 

SATURDAY, May 3 

Fthers' Day. Athletic events — Geor- 
gia Tech. baseball; Syracuse, track; 
Syracuse, lacrosse; Syracuse, freshman 
baseball. See posters for time of 
events. 

SUNDAY, May 4 

Chapel Speaker — President Thomas 

PENNY. ACADEMY OF SCIENCES 

A group of scientific workers of the 
State met at Harrisburg during the 
Easter holidays and effected the pre- 
liminary organization of the Pennsyl- 
vania Academy of Sciences. Its objects 
are to further scientific research, par- 
ticularly in matters related to Penn- 
sylvania; to promote intercourse be- 
tween those engaged in it, especially in 
this State; and to prepare for publi- 
cation reports that may achieve its 
aims. Dr. F. D. Kern, dean of the 
Graduate School, was elected treasur- 
er of the organization. 

Any person engaged in any depart- 
ment of scientific work is eligible for 
active membership, and those who 
join before the next meeting, when 
the constitution comes up for final 
adoption, will be listed as charter mem- 
bers. The fee is two dollars the first 
year and one dollar each subsequent 
year. Many members of the faculty 
are eligible for membership and may 
join the organization by seeing Dean 
Kern. 

o ' — 

EDUCATOR TO SPEAK 

Dr. Edgar Fahs Smith, former pro- 
vost of the University of Pennsylvania 
and distinguished chemist, educator, and 
author, will address the State College 
section of the American Chemical iSoc- 
iety on Thursday, May 1, at 8:00 p. m. 
in the Chemistry Annex. The lecture 
is open to the general public. 
_ 

SPANISH CLUB 

The Circulo de los Amigos de la Len- 
gua Espanola will give a special mus- 
ical program on Wednesday evening, 
April 30, at 7:30 in Old Chapel. Those 
interested in Spanish music and life are 
cordially invited to attend. 



W.D. CROCKETT . 
3 13 KM» BLPO 



:i.t -..-. . - - 









Published every Tuesday 
luring the college year as a 
neans of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
tems of interest to the facul- 
:y. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

:n 



VOLUME 3 



State College, Pa., May 6, 1924 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



NUMBER 31 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

There will be a meeting of the fac- 
•lty of the School of Education on Mon- 
ay, May 12, at 4:30, in Room 121, Old 
Iain. — H. G. Parkinson, secretary. 



SUMMER REGISTRATION 

Students now in college who expect 
o take work in the Summer Session 
/•ill be registered on Friday and >Satur- 
ay May 16 and 17. The registration 
roeess recently authorized by the 
touncil of Administration will be used 
>r the first time on these dates. The 
tepis in registration under the new 
ieme will be as follows: 

1- — The student prepares at the office 
f his scheduling officer, a daily sehe- 
ule. The form to be used 'will be one 
f the regular schedule cards now in 
! se; both sides of the card will (be filled 
ut although nothing concerning fees 
i ill be added by the scheduling officer. 

2.— The student takes this schedule 
pproved by the scheduling officer, to 
ie office of the Registrar where a 
'anket form supplying information for 
11 departments and offices of the col- 
ge is filled out. The Registrar in- 
jects and approves the blanket form 
id keeps it and the trial schedule sub- 
mitted by the student. 
:.3— The student goes to the Treas- 
rer's office, pays his fees, receives a 
>py of his schedule and a receipt which 
also a matriculation card good for 
ie Summer Session. 

j -1. — The Registrar sends to each of 
ie offices concerned the information 
Deviously furnished by the student at 
pious points on the campus. — W. S. 
ibftfrnan, Registrar. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

' During the past week the following 
udents have left college: 

Senior 
ibompson, John W., CE 

Junior 
Inderson, W. L., DH 

Sophomores 
(lair, Morgan H., L\H 
ongeneoker, Frank W., CF 
iarkins, Robert W., IE 
Freshmen 
jurman, Miss Lurene, ALi 
[iorewood, John H., Ag 



STUDENT RE-INSTATED 

The following student has been re- 
stated in the school indicated: 
Bisler, John M., Hrt 



UNIVERSITY CLUB 

A (business meeting and smoker for 
diversity Club members will be held 
the clufo house on 'Saturday evening, 
ay 10, ait 8:00. 



THREE YEARS OF PROGRESS 

President John M. Thomas has just 
completed his third year at Penn Statu 
and a review of his administration to 
date by the Bulletin brings to light 
the many progressive steps that have 
been accomplished. Among these the 
following are outstanding: 

Policy. — This was defined in his in- 
augural address. 

Organization. — The Graduate School 
and the School of Education were or- 
ganized; the College Senate was con- 
stituted as legislative body in place of 
the general faculty; the Council of 
Administration was reorganized as the 
President's cabinet; Library re-organ- 
ization was planned. 

Public . Relations. — Contacts were 
made through addresses in -13 counties; 
four Attorney General's opinions rat- 
ed the college as a state institution; 
educational results from the Cam- 
paign; Annual Report issued and sen: 
to 20,000 constituents. 

Plant. — $8,000,000 Bond Issue Bill 
passed Legislature of 1923; 251 acres 
added to farms by purchase; 302 
acres leased with option to buy; men's 
dormitory system begun with Frederick 
Watts Hall; Varsity Hall started; beef 
cattle barn completed; $1,500,000 pledg- 
ed for Welfare buildings: development 
plan adopted; campus improvement 
plan outlined; $41,000 added to trust 
funds. 

Instruction. — Correlation of courses 
of study through permanent Senate 
Committee; improvement of Summer 
Session program; courses added in 
Ceramics and Highway Engineering; 
simplification of -'courses, %s%ecially in 
Liberal Arts; Department of Agricul- 
I'ral Economics established; Teacher 
Training Extension established; Engi- 
neers' Unit of R. O. T. o. esablished. 

o 

WATER GLASS EGGS 
The Poultry department will have 
for sale during the month of May eggs 
suitable for putting down in water 
glass. These eggs will be selected, 
fresh, infertile, and of good quality. 
All orders must consist of at least ten 
dozen eggs. A flat price of 25 cents a 
dozen will be charged and all sales are 
for cash only. 

Orders should be left at the Poultry 
Husbandry office, Room 206, Hort 
Building. 

o 

CAMPAIGN RECEIPTS 

■Campaign receipts for the past -week 
were as follows: 

New York '$1125 

Erie —- . 292 

Butler i85 

New Jersey 105 

Allegheny i 1°° 

IClearfield 100 

Bucks j 8 

Total $1915 



CALENDAR 



THURSDAY, May 8 

Baseball, Penn 'Stats vs. Gettysburg, 
4:20. 

Pinafore, comic opera, Auditorium, 
8:15. 

SATURDAY, May 10 

Baseball, Penn State vs. Bucknell, 
2:30; tennis, Bucknell, 2:30. 

Business meeting at University Club, 
S:U0. 

SUNDAY, Miiy 11 

Chapel Speaker — Dr. W- Warren 
Giles, First Reformed Church, East Or- 
ange, N. J. 

MONDAY, May 12 

Education faculty meeting, 4:30, 121 
Old Main. 

TO A OMIT 1000 FRESHMEN 

The executive committee of the 
Board of Trustees at its meeting dur- 
ing the? holidays took action limiting 
the incoming freshman class next fall 
to 1000. The Registrar will not start 
granting admissions until July. 
o 

"PITS AFORE" ON THURSDAY 

Preparations are practically complete 
for tlie staging of 'Pinafore" in the 
Auditorium on Thursday evening, May 
8, at 8:15. This famous comic opera 
is being staged by the Department of 
Music as Penn State's feature contri- 
bution to National Music Week, and will 
be under the direction of Richard JV. 
Grant, assisted by the Wayiburn Studios 
and by Professor A, C. Oloetingh. 

The proceeds of the performance ai*e 
to be added to the fund for the pur- 
chase of new pianos for the Auditorium, 
a most worthy object. Arrangements 
have been made for an advance sale of 
tickets to take place at the Co-op to- 
night (Tuesday), at 7:00. The price of 
tickets is $1.25, $1.00, and 75 cents. 



RADIO BROADCASTING 

Radio broadcasting programs are rap- 
idly filling up for the balance of the 
college year. Those faculty members 
who feel that they have suitable radio 
subjects for broadcasting are requested 
to get in touch with Program Director 
'Oresewell as soon as possible. It is 
likely that .broadcasting from the college 
station will stop for the summer about 
the first of June. 



MOCK SALE 

The annual dairy fitting and showing 
contest and mock sale held by the Dairy 
Husbandry department will .take place 
in the stock pavilion on Saturday, May 
10, at 1:00. 



W.D.CROCKETT . 

3 1 3 M A i N B L P G 



Tiina'!! 



Published every Tuesday 
luring the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
Items of interest to the facul- 
ty 



The Pennsyl 

FACULT 



a State College 

BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 3 



State College, Pa., May 13, 1924 



NUMBER 32 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



COLLEGE SENATE 

The College iSenate will meet on Thurs- 
day, May 15, at 7:30, in the Foyer of the 
Auditorium. 



NATURAL SCIENCE FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the fac- 
ulty of the School of Natural Science 
today (Tuesday) at 4:30, in the Physics 
Lecture Room. — E. H. Dusham, Secre- 
tary. 



LIBERAL ARTS FACULTY 

The Liberal Arts faculty will meet on 
Wednesday, May 14, at 4:30, in Boom 25, 
Liberal Arts Building. — L. V. T. Sim- 
mons, 'Secretary. 

o 

AGRICULTURAL FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the faculty 
pf the School of Agriculture on Thurs- 
day, May 15, at 4:30, in Room 103, Agri- 
cultural Building. — R. L. Watts, dean. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 

Sophomores 
Mien, James D., Met 
Balles, P. W., IE 

Freshman 
3sler, Miss Martha, HE 



SUMMER REGISTRATION 

| In accordance with the reguations an- 
nounced last week, registration of stu- 
dents now in college for the Summer 
[Session will take place on Friday, May 
16, all day, and on iSaturday, May 17, 
until noon.— W. S. Hoffman, Registrar. 



FORMER FACULTY MEMBER DIES 

Word has recently been received of 
the sudden death of Mrs. William D. 
'Clark (nee Emma McFeely), at lOhapel 
Kill, N. C. Mr. Clark died last year. 
'.Both Mr. and Mrs. Clark were members 
erf the Penn iState faculty for a numtber 
of years and had many warm friends 
ihere. 



CAMPAIGN RECEIPTS 

For the past week the campaign re- 
ceipts bave been as (follows: 

freshmen $1500 

^ew York 795 

New Jersey 700 

?ork 92 

Bradford 84 

: Jnion 8 

Clinton 2 



Total __. 



$3181 



GOOD PROGRAM FRIDAY 

The (School of Engineering especially 
invites members of the faculty to at- 
tend the open meeting of the fifth annu- 
al Industrial Conference to be held in 
the Auditorium at 8 o'clock on Friday 
evening. 

The speakers include Alba B. Johnson, 
a trustee of the college and president of 
the iState IChamfoer of Commerce, who 
will tell of "The Mussolini Movement" in 
Italy; Judge W. D. B. Ainey, chairman 
of the Pennsylvania Public iStervice 
'Commission, who will speak on the ac- 
tivities of that body; and W. H. Conn ell, 
engineering executive of the State High- 
way Department, who will speak on 
"Qualifications for Various Lines of Ser- 
vice in the State Highway Department". 
The talk of Mr. Johnson should prove of 
special interest 'to Penn State faculty 
members. The conference will bring 
from 50 to 75 industrial representatives 
from all parts of the state. 
_ o 

RESEARCH WORK ON MEAT 

A fund has been established by the 
National Livestock and Meat Board for 
scientific research on the nutritive 
value of meat. The object is to deter- 
mine the fundamental facts regarding 
meat as a component of the human 
diet. The investigations will be con- 
ducted through fellowships paying $2400 
each, the work to be carried on at var- 
ious laboratories chosen with reference 
to the particular problems to be stud- 
ied. 

This research fund , will be adminis- 
tered by a special committee of the 
National Research Council of which Dr. 
E. B. Forbes, Director of the Institute 
of Animal Nutrition, has been elected 
chairman. Experimental work on this 
project will begin July first. 



BOOK BY DR. BATTENHOUSE 

The Century Publishing Company has 
announced the publication of a volume 
in Century Readings in the New Testa- 
ment, prepared by Dr. J. W. Cunliffe, 
of Columbia University, and Dr. H. M. 
Battenhouse, of the Department of Eng- 
lish at this college. This is the com- 
panion volume to Century Readings in 
the Old Testament which came from 
the press in August, 1923. 

A second edition is being prepared 
to be published under a single cover 
and is to be called Century Readings 
in the Bible. 



OPINION SOUGHT BY CONGRESS 

Dean Holhrook accepted an invitation 
to appear before the Congressional Com- 
mittee on Mines and Mining in Wash- 
ington last week to give expert testi- 
mony regarding certain bills pertaining 
to mining which have been Introduced 
into Congress. 



CALENDAR 



TUESDAY, May 13 

Natural Science faculty meeting, 4:30, 
Physics Lecture Room. 

Baseball, Penn .State vs. W. Va. Wes- 
leyan, 4:20, New Beaver. 

WEDNESDAY, May 14 

Liberal Arts faculty meeting, 4:30, 
25 L. A. 

THURSDAY, May 15 

Agricultural faculty meeting, 4:30, 103 
Ag. 

College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Auditor- 
ium. 

FRIDAY, May 16 

Open meeting, Industrial Conference, 
8 : 00, Auditorium. 

SATURDAY, May 17 

Intei-scholastic track, 10:00 a. m.; 
finals. 2:00 p. m. 

Lacrosse. Penn State vs. Cornell, 3:30; 
baseball, Freshmen vs. Bucknell Re- 
serves, 3:30. 

Penn State Players at University Club, 
S : 30. Members only. 

SUNDAY, May 18 

Chapel speaker — Dr. Edwin Hey] Delk. 
!St. Matthew's Lutheran Church, Phila- 
delphia. 

TO CLOSE OLD MAIN DORMS' 

Recent action by the Trustees will 
eliminate the use of Old Main as a men's 
dormitory after the close of the present 
college year. The 155 students now 
rooming in the buiding have been noti- 
fied to vacate their rooms following 
Commencement. Although loath to cut 
down on the already limited dormitory 
space at the college, the Trustees felt 
that the upper floors of the buiding were 
no longer safe for dormitory use. Class- 
rooms and offices will still be maintained 
in the building. 

The building has been used as a dormi- 
tory for 61 years, having been completed 
in 1863, the first structure on the cam- 
pus. 

o- 

GOWNS FOR COMMENCEMENT 

All faculty members desiring caps and 
gowns for Commence'ment are requested 
to send the following information to R. 
iS. Fitch, Delta Upsilon House, through 
whom they Imay be ordered, before 
Thursday, May 15: Name, degree held, 
address, height, weight, hat size, chest 
measurement, and length of gown desir- 
ed. Fee of $2.50 .must accompany order. 

o 

MISS SIMMONS HONORED 

Professor L. V. T. Simmons, head of 
the Department of German, has been 
elected to the Council of the Pennsyl- 
vania iState Modern Language Associa- 
tion for the term 1924 to 1927. 



"' • n . CROCKETT 

* i * 

3 1"? 8 * * ? M -, 

*■ A i N b L n G 



Published every Tuesday 
liring' the college year as a 
leans of making: offici;! an- 
ouncements and presenting 
iems of interest to the facul- 



ae rennsyivania 






lege 



OLUfvIE 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



JUNE SENATE MEETING 

it the meeting of the College Sen- 
last week it was decided to hold 
June meeting on Tuesday, June 3, 

ead of at the regular date, which 

aes after Commencement. 
o 

HR1STMAS RECESS CHANGED 

:he College Senate at its meeting 
t week voted to change the date for 
! opening of the next Christmas vaca- 
h cram Tuesday, December 23, to 
idly, December 19, at 5:20 p. in. This 
1 acid four clays iio the vacation per- 



.SENTQR GRADES 

fife graduating class this ye; ■ : 

otber over 500. Instructors having 
liars in their classes are earnestly re- 
lated to report Senior grades to the 
gistrar at .the earliest possible mom- 
:.lln the event that a portion of the 
.si is exempt so that some grades 
So reported earlier, please do so. 
^■brder to be sure .that all names 
Relucted, instructors are requested 
miestion .their classes to ascertain 
tljtere are any Seniors enrolled, 
aaes should be reported on separate 
ets and .plainly 'marked "Si. 
afles" on both the sheet and the en- 
lope. 

fine Registrar will consider the per- 
ial delivery of all grades to this of- 
Sis a distinct favor. All Senior 
ides .should be in the hands of the 
Sifitrar not later Ikon 4:30 p. m.. on 
■fcesrtriy, Juno 4. — W. S. Hoffman, 
gistrar. 

in ODES SC HOLARSHIPS 

Members of the faculty who arc in- 
'ested in (students eligible for ap- 
intment to Rhodes Sehoilarships are 
ted to send the names of such stu- 
nts to Professor E. D. Walker, chair - 
an of the Committee on Academic 
Wards, as soon as possible. 

BAND CONCERT 

V free concert, arrangements for 
iich have been made by the French 
Jib, will be given in the Auditorium 
Thursday evening at 8:15. The mili- 
y band, under the direction of Mr. 
ompson, and other musical organiza- 
ne will take part in the concert. 



BOOK REVIEW BY DR. PATTEE 

)r. Fred Lewis Pattee, head of the 
partment of English who has been 
a leave of adsence during the pre- 
t college year, contributed to the 
ril issue of the Yale Review a review 
several books by William Lyon 
3lps and Stuart P. Sherman. 



TY 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



State College, Pa., May 20, 1924 

HOW PENN STATE SELECTS 

INCOMING FRESHMAN CLASS 
By Wm. S. Hoffman, Registrar 
Most state institutions accept for ad- 
mission all well qualified applicants who' 
are graduates of approved high schools 
within the state, and who meet the en- 
trance requirements for the course in 
Which they are (interested. For the past 
■' '.;.- The Pennsylvania State College 
has not been able to admit nearly all 
qualified candidates on account of 'lim- 
cl i i iss-room and laboratory facilities, 
due to inadequate support from the 
state. 

The first step in the admission of a 
m w freshmen class therefore is to de- 
fine its size. For the past four 
velars the number of freshmen admit - 
red has been about one thousand each 
. oar. As scon as the size of the 
man Blase has been fixed, the whole 
number is divided among the thirty or 
more courses offered by the college in 
o ■ rtions based upon the enrollment 
1. i-eshnsan class for the two or 
three years preceding. For September. 
".". with one thousand freshmen to 
■ admitted, the quota by schools is as 
!i !1 "A's: 

Agriculture 165 

Education 100 

Engineering 400 

LCbi ill Arts 15o 

Mines So 

Natural Science 105 

Another distribution then has to be 

made on the basis of the population of 

}■■.■ state, with an apportionment to 

,■.■ h county of its proper quota accord - 

to its population. The quota for 

representative counties <is as follows: 

r. rks 23 

Butler 

Chester 14 

As >■ i.on as the quotas for the various 
counties and for the several courses 
have been determined, the actual pro- 
i ; ■ of admission can begin. Applica- 
! ions for any year are not received be- 
fore January first of that year. Until 
Lhis year no one has been notified of 
.■ ceptanoe for admission before July 
first, all applications being placed on 
file until the numerous high schools of 
the -state have bold their commencement 
raises and all applicants have had a 
fair chance to file their credentials. 

In the more crowded courses, eucih as 
Electrical Engineering and Commerce 
and Finance, where the number ef ap- 
plicants is far in excess of the quota 
that can be accepted, only those who 
'Stand On the upper third of their high 
s hoel class have a good chance at se- 
curing' admission. In certain other 
courses, where the pressure is not so 
great, praat'icallly all applicants who 
meet entrance requirements can be ac- 
cepted. This is especially true of can- 



NUMBER 33 



CALENDAR 

WEDNESDAY, May 21 
Lecture, 7:15, Room 200, Engineering D. 
FRIDAY, May 23 
School of Education picnic, 4:30, For- 
estry Woodl'Ot. 

Ladies' Night at University Club. 

SATURDAY, May 24 
Baseball, Penn State Fresh vs. Pitt 
Fresh, 2:30, New Beaver. 

SUNDAY, May 25 
iel -Speaker — Bishop EtlhcQibert 
Talbot, D.D., of Bethlehem, Pa. 

didates who seek 'admission to 1 /the 
School of Agriculture. 
Even though Penn State cannot ac- 
ommodate .more than half the appli- 
cants who wish to enter, the Registrar 
always welcome from the faculty let- 
tens of recommendation in behalf of 
applicants with outstanding ability. 



STEAM FROM ELECTRICITY 
An interesting lecture on the design, 
construction, and operation of steam 
boilers, including the exhibition of an 
electrically heated glass boiler which 
permits one to observe hew steam is 
formed and how it circulates, is sched- 
ulcd for Wednesday evening, May 21, 
■■■; 7:15 in Room 200, Engineering D. 

The speaker will be Mr. R. Eugene 
Foresman, of E. Keeler Company. All 
Interested are invited to attend and it 
is requested that they be in their seats 
in good Lime so that the demonstration 
may begiin promptly. 

o — 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION PTCNTC 
The first annual picnic for faculty 
m ers, wives, and students of the 
'School of Education will take plac'e on 
Friday, May 23, at 4:30, in the woodlot 
between the golf course and New Bea- 
ver Field. A fee of thirty-five cents 
will be charged per person. 

o 

UNIVERSITY CLUB 

Ladies Night at the University Club 
will toe held on Friday, May 23, with 
dinner and dancing. Reservations for 
the dinner should be made with Mr. 
Clayton by Wednesday noon. 



CAMPAIGN RECEIPTS 
For the past week Campaign receipts 
■have been as follows : 

Lackawanna $501 

Philadelphia 355 

Lancaster 55 

Montgomery 50 

New Jersey 50 

Bradford 30 

Delaware (county) 25 

Fayette 16 

Total $1082 



' • H. CROCKETT . 
2 13 MAIN BLDG 



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Published every Tuesday 
luring the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
Items of interest to the facul- 
ty 



Tie Pennsylvania State Coll 




Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 3 

OFFICIAL NOTICES 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the Grad- 
uate faculty on Tuesday, June 3, at 
3:30, in the Foyer of the Auditorium. — 
F. D. Kern, dean. 

o — — 

GRADE REPORTS 

Attention of members of the instruc- 
tional staff is called to the notice in 
last week's Bulletin concerning Senior 
grades. 

Grades for ail Seniors should be on 
file in the offices of the Deans and of 
the Registrar not later than 4:30 p. m., 
on Wednesday, June 4. 

■ Numerical grades must be submitted 
for all persons scheduled for any sub- 
ject except in the case of those who 
have had approved drop schedules or 
for whcsn a deferred grade has been 
authorized. The regulations concern- 
ing deferred grades are as follows: 

1. That deferred grades be given 
students only on account of serious ill- 
ness, illness at home, or other equally 
important reasons for absence from 
examinations or for aJbsence during a 
considerable period just preceding exa- 
minations. 

2. That the period during which ; 
grade may be deferred shall not ex.-e- 
four weeks from the ~ end of the sem- 
ester. At the end of that time, for 
good cause, the period may be extended 
by special action. 

3. That the school in which the stu- 
dent is registered be responsible for 

[ranting all deferred grades amd foot 
informing the Registrar, and also foi 
informing the Deans when deferred 
grades are granted for subjects taught 
in their schools; that further details of 
administration be left to each school. 

4. That when a student is absent 
from an examination a grade "deferred' 
shall he reported only when such is 
authorized. When a grade has not been 
"deferred", the instructor should report 
:sucih grade as his judgment dictates 
when a student is absent from, an exa- 
'miniation. — W. S. Hoffman, Registrar. 

PROFESSOR FRIES HONORED 

I Professor J. A. Pries, associate direc- 
tor of the Institute of Animal Nutri- 
tion, has been signally honored by be- 
jing elected to membership' in the Swed- 
ish branch of "Nordiska, Jordbi uksfor- 
jskares Porening". This is in recogni- 
tion of the research work in animal 
nutrition accomplished at this college. 

The society is composed of scientific 
| investigators in subjects relating to ag- 
riculture, and it includes the four coun- 
tries Sweden, Norway, Denmark, and 
Finland. Professor Fries has the mark- 
ed distinction of bemg the only repre- 
sentative from the United States in the 
society. 



State College, Pa., May 27, 1924 

NEW COMMANDANT APPOINTED 

Announcement has recently been 
made that Lt. Col. Clenard McLaughlin, 
now stationed at Fort Leavenworth, has 
been detailed by the war department to 
take charge of military instruction at 
Penn State starting next September. 
He will succeed Captain G. L. Febiger 
who has been commandant for the past 
year. The latter will attend the sum- 
mer camp at Camp Meade and in the 
amd will report for duty at the infantry 
school at Fort Benning, Ga. 

Colonel McLaughlin enlisted in the 
army as a private in 1897 and served 
through the Spanish-American war, 
coming out a sergeant. He remained 
with the airmy and became a captain 
in 1011. He was given the temporary 
rank of major at the outbreak of the 
world war in 1917, and was made major 
in 1918. Two years later he received 
the rank of lieutenant-colonel. He is 
now in a special command and general 
staff schcicil at Leavenworth. 

.!)!(, KELLY WIN'S PRIZE 

A piper submitted by Dr. J. P. Kelly, 
of the Botany department, has been 
awarded a prize by the Boston Society 
of Natural History, which organization 
annually offers two prizes for the best 
memoirs written in the English lan- 
guage, on subjects proposed by the Soc- 
iety. In 1924, any subject in the field 
of Botany was acceptable. 

Dr. Kelly's subject, "The Inheritance 
of Dcuhleneiss in Phlox", was based on 
a considerable body of original and un- 
y.uMli-hed work done at Penn State 
where he has been investigating in- 
heritance problems in Phlox for the 
= i >en years. The prize, which in ad- 
dition to the honor, carries with it an 
i r. 1 rarium of fifty dollars, is a tribute 
to the fine research work which he has 
been doing. 

o ■ 

APPLIED ART EXHIBIT 

There will be an exhibition of the 
work of the Freshman girls in the 
course in Applied Art today (Tuesday) 
in the Fine Arts Museum, 284 Main 
Building. The hours are from 3:00 to 
5:00, and from 7:00 to 9:00. Problems 
in block-painting, batik, tied amd dyed 
work, and parchment will be on dis- 
play. 

o — 

CAMPAIGN RECEIPTS' 

-Campaign receipts for the past week 
have been as follows: 

Allegheny $860 

Freshmen 700 

Washington (county) 500 

New Jersey 150 

Faculty 25 

Huntingdon 6 

Clinton 4 

Total $2245 



NUMBER 34 



CALENDAR 



THURSDAY, May 39 
Military field day. Afternoon class- 
es suspended. 

FRIDAY, May 30 
Memorial Day holiday. Athletic ev- 
ents — Fre-:hman baseball, Harrisburg 
Tech, 10:00; Kiski, 4:00; varsity base- 
ball, Ursinus, 2:30. 

SATURDAY, May 31 
Baseball, Penn State vs. Ursinus, 
2:30. 

SUNDAY, June 1 
No chapel — Examination week. 

TUESDAY, June 3 
Graduate -faculty meeting, 3:30, Foy- 
er of Auditorium. 

College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Audi- 
torium. 

MEMORIAL DAY 

Friday of his week. Memorial Day, 
will be regularly observed as a general 
uoliege holiday and all college exercises 
will be suspended for the clay. War vet- 
eran organizations of the community 
have arranged for a parade and appro- 
priate Memorial Day exercises in the 
morning, when General Muir and other 
prominent officers will be present. Ath- 
letic events for the day include a Fresh- 
man baseball gume with Harrisburg 
Tech in ihe morning, and a varsity 
game with Ursinus and Freshman game 
with Kiski, both in (lie afternoon. 

o — — 

RADIO STATION TO CLOSE 

The college radio broadcasting sta- 
tion will close for the summer following 
a Memorial Day program on Friday 
evening which has been arranged by the 
war veteran organizations. Broadcast- 
ing will be resumed after the opening 
of college in the fall, probably about 
October first. 

MILITARY FIELD DAY 

The annual military review and field 
day will take place on Thursday after- 
noon of this week starting at 2:00. All 
college exercises will be suspended for 
the afternoon. Major General Charles 
H. Muir, commander of the Third Corps 
Area, R. O. T. G, with headquarters in 
Baltimore, will be the official review- 
ing officer and will be accompanied by 
other prominent military men. The re- 
view will take place on Holmes Field. 

o 

DOMESTIC ART EXHIBIT 

There will be an exhibition of the 
work of Domestic Art classes on Wed- 
nesday of this week at 7:30 p. m., in 
Room 14, Women's Building. An ex- 
hibition of posters made by students in 
Household Chemistry will be included. 



p, 

1 3 



1 N 



i i . 

sin s 



_> 



Published every Tuesday 
luring the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the facul- 



Pennsylvania State College 







Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 A. M. each Saturday 



VOLUME 3 



State College, Pa., June 3, 1924 



NUMBER 35 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

COLLEGE SENATE 

The June meeting of the College Sen- 
ate will fake place this (Tuesday) 
evening at 7:30, in the Foyetr of the 
Auditorium. 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

There wall be a meeting of the facul- 
ty of the Graduate School at 3:30 to- 
day (Tuesday), in the Foyer of the Au- 
ditorium — F. D. Kern, Dean. 



N'lEW SCHEDULING OFFICES 

Clarence B. Bullinger, for the past 

two years a member of the Industrial 
Engineering department, is the new- 
Scheduling Officer in the Registrar's 
office, succeeding C. P. Maclnnis. 



ii 



The Res 
tention of 
following 
reporlts ai 
Registrar 
after the 
tiion; or in 
no examiin 
ter the las 
Boffma 



GRADE REPORTS 

fistrar desires to call the at- 
a>ll faculty members to the 
college regulation: "Grade 
■e due at the office of the 
and of the Dean one week 
date of the final examinia- 
the case of subjects in which 
ation is given, one week af- 
;t meeting of the olas's." — W. 
n, Registrar. 



LAST FACULTY BULLETIN 

This will he the final issue of the 
Paoulty Bulletin for tlhe present col- 
lege year. Publication will be resumed 
with the reopening of college next fall, 
under date of 'September 23. 



FACULTY WELCOME 

Faculty 'members are cordially invit- 
Jd to participate in the enjoyment of 
:he big Alumni Day carnival on Satur- 
day. This will be held on the Armory 
ield and promises to be well worth at- 
:end5ng. 



PENN STATE PLAYERS 

The Penn State Players will give 
heir final performance of the year on 
Friday evening at 8:00 in the Audi- 
;;orium when they will be seen in 
'Captain Applejack." The Oornmence- 
nent production promises bo be in 
ceeping with the high standard of 
tamer Player performances and a 
itrong cJast has been selected. Tickets 
vdll be on sale a't the box office before 
he play. 



CAMPAIGN TOTAL 

Figures just given out by the Comp- 
iler's office show that pledges, in the 
ISmergency Building Fund Campaign 
o date total $1,616,467.90. 






ORDER OF PROCESSIONS 

FOR COMMENCEMENT WEEK 

Alt the public college exercises on 
Sunday and Tuesday mornings, the 
faculty will be seated upon the plat- 
form., all other seats being reserved 
fio:r parents of t'he graduates. Academ- 
ic oostume Will be worn. Caps will be 
removed at the invocation and resum- 
ed at the recession. 

On both Baccalaureate Sunday and 
Commencement Day, faculty members 
will assemble in the Carnegie Library, 
On Sunday they should assemble no 
later than 10:15 a. in., and on Tues- 
day at 9:15 a. m. All candidates for 
advanced degrees are asked to gather 
in the Reading Room to the right of 
the entrance. 

Seats will be taken on the stage in 
order cif the procession, beginning with 
the first full row. Only the chairs for 
the chaplain, clergyman, and official 
guests will be placarded in the front 
row. 

In case of inclement weather on 
either day, the assembling will take 
place in the Foyer of the Auditorium 
as ;;bove outlined. 



JUDGE ESSAY CONTEST 

The Department of English, under 
the direction of Dr. W. S. Dye, Jr., has 
just completed judging essays submit- 
ted by Pennsylvania high school stu- 
dents in the National Good Roads Es- 
say Contest for 1924, conducted by the 
Highway Education Board for the H. 
S. Firestone university scholarship. A 
total of 186 essays were submitted to 
the department from 118 cities and 
villages in the state. 



TO TOUR EUROPE 

Miss Edith P. Chace, of the Depart- 
ment of Hoime Economies, left last 
week for a three months' tour of 
Europe. She is a member of the party 
being conducted by Professor W- D. 
lOrockett, of the Department of Class- 
ical Languages. 



PROFESSOR BONINE HONORED 

Professor C. A. Bonine has been el- 
ected to the Grand Council of the 
honorary and professional geological 
fraternity, Sigma Gamma Epsilon. He 
recently represented the School of Mines 
at the May meeting of the Society of 
Economic Geologists in New York. 



In an article on "American Litera- 
•ture in the College 'Curriculum" in the 
May issue of the Educational Review, 
Dr. F. L. Pattee mentions the fact that 
Penn State is one of the three colleges 
in the country which have pnofessOr- 
shiips in American Literature. 



CALENDAR 



TUESDAY, June 3 

Graduate Faculty meeting, 3:30, Foy- 
er of Auditorium. 

College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Au- 
ditorium. 

FRIDAY, June 6 

Baseball, Penn State vs. Pitt, 2:30; 
tennis with Pitt, 4:00. 

Alumni Dinner. McAllister Hall, 7:00. 
Penn Sltalte Players, Auditorium, 8:00. 
SATURDAY, June 7 

Aiuimnii Day. Carnival opens 9:00 a. 
m. 

Truck. Penn State vs. Pitt, 1:30; golf 
with Pitt, 2:00; baseball with Pitt, 3:00. 

Musical clubs' concert, Auditorium, 
7:30. 

SUNDAY, June 8 

Baccalaureate Serman by Dr. Deon 
C. Prince, Carlisle, Pa., at 10:30, Audi- 

riumi. Faculty procession. 

Band concert, Front Campus or Au- 
ditorium, 4:00. 

Instrumental and vocal concert, Au- 
ditorium, 8 : 00. 

MONDAY, June 9 

Class Day exercises, Open Air The- 
atre, 10:00. 

Thespian Play, Auditorium, 7:00. 
TUESDAY, June 10 

Commencement exercises, Auditorium, 
10:00. Faculty on platform. 

THURSDAY, June 12 
Farmers' Field Day. 

SATURDAY, July 5 
iS'umimer Session registration day. 

MONDAY, July 7 
Summer Session begins. 



AGRICULTURAL BOOKLET 

The School of Agriculture has just 
published a 28-page illustrated booklet 
bearing the title "Your College of Agri- 
culture." The opportunities offered 
through pursuing agricultural courses 
at Penn State are outlined in detail for 
the ten separate divisions of the school, 
and the booklet will be sent out to all 
prospective agricultural students. Fac- 
ulty members who know of any such 
prospective students should advise 
Dean R. L. Watts who will be glad to 
see that they receive copies of tho 
booklet. 



■ o 

ENGAGEMENT ANNOUNCED 

The engagement of Miss Kathryn D. 
Bower, of Williamsport, and Mr. H. O. 
Smith, of the college Department of 
Architecture, has recently been an- 
nounced. 



W. P. CROCKETT , 
313 UAlN BLDO 



U H S ' i ■ ■ 



. 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



VOLUME 4 



State College, Pa., September 23, 1924 



NUMBER 1 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



OPENING EXERCISES 

President Thomas is especially desir- 
ous of having all faculty members at- 
tend the opening' exercises of the 
College on Wednesday morning' at 10:30 
in the Auditorium. He particularly 
requests that they occupy seats on the 
platform. 

MEETING OF THE SENATE 

The first meeting of the Oollegte 
Senate has been called for Thursday 
evening, September 25, at 7.30, in the 
Foyer of the Auditorium. Future Sen- 
ate meetings, according to the By- 
Laws, will be held regularly on the 
third Thursday of each month. 

■ o ■ 

PRESIDENT'S RECEPTION 

President and Mrs. Thomas invite all 
new members of the Faculty and their 
wives and all members of the College 
Senate and their wives to an informa 1 
eception at the President's House on 
Friday evening, October 3, from eight 
;o ten o'clock. 



COUNCIL MEETING 

The first meeting of the Council of 
Ulmdnistration will be held in the 
President's Office on Monday, Sept- 
ember 29, at 10.00 a.m. Council will 
fleet regularly each Monday through- 
>ut the year. Any persons having 
>usine?s for consideration of the Coun- 
il at any time are asked to present 
he same to the Registrar before the 
ime of meeting each Monday morning. 

O 

TO COME BEFORE SENATE 

It is expected that a preliminary 
'dition of "Regulations Affecting 
Students" will be submitted to the Col- 
ege Senate at its meeting on Thursday 
ivendng. This is a codification of all 
■xisting rules prepaired by Dean 
iVarnock and Registrar Hoffman. 
Members of the Senate are asked to 
five this pamphlet careful study in 
'rder that a complete and accurate 
•fficial edition may be issued promptly. 

o 

NEW GRADING SYSTEM 

| The attention of all instructors is 
:alled to the new system of grading 
hat is to be followed this year. All 
,'rades are to be reported by honor 
>oints 3, 2, 1, 0, -1 and -2. 

These grades have the (following 
lumerical equivalent : 

3—90-100 inclusive. 

2—80-89 inclusive 

1—70-79 inclusive 

0-^60-69 inclusive 
-1 — 45-59 inclusive 
-2 — below 45 
I A grade of -1 is a condition and 
jntitles the student to a re-examin- 



ation. A grade of -2 is a failure. — W. S. 
Hoffman, Registrar. 

NEW ADMINISTRATIVE HEADS 

Three new administrative heads 
come to Penn State with the opening 
oJ the college year. 

Dr. Gerald L. Wendt, formerly di- 
rector of research for the Standard 
Oil Company of Indiana, is the new 
Dean of the School of Chemistry and 
Physics; Miss Sabra W. Vought be- 
comes the new librarian of the Carnegie 
Library, succeeding Dr. Runkle; and 
Lieutenant-Colonel Clenard McLaugh- 
lin replaces Captain Febiger as heal 
of the Department of Military Science 
and Tactics. 

Dr. Wendt is a graduate of Harvard 
"University and comes to Penn State 
with the reputation of being one of 
strongest men in the scientific field. 
He is ranked as one of the one thous- 
and most eminent American men of 
science and for the past year he has 
been chairman of the Chicago Section 
of the American Chemical Society 
which has over one thousand members. 
His record in chemical research work 
is outstanding. 

Miss Vought comes to the College 
with a fine record of more than twenty 
years in library work. She is a grad- 
uate of Allegheny College and for the 
past five years has been supervisor of 
school libraries for the University of 
the State of New York. 

Colonel McLaughlin comes to Penn 
State from the command and staff 
school at Fort Leavenworth. He will 
b? in charge of the student regiment of 
the R.O.T.C., including the newly est- 
ablished Engineers' Unit. The latter 
will be under the direct jurisdiction 
of Captain Cunningham, of the U.S. 
Army Engineers' Corps. 

FACULTY MEN NEEDED TO 

TEACH ROCKYIEW CLASSES 

At the request of the board of 
trustees of the Western Penitentiary, 
the College will continue its work in 
the organization and operation of ex- 
tension classes at the Rockview Pen- 
itentiary. The number of courses to 
be offered will be increased consider- 
ably this year and several instructors 
will be required from the college 
faculty. 

Anyone interested in giving one or 
two evenings a week, from 6:00 until 
S 00, to this work is asked to com- 
municate with Professor N. C. Miller, 
head of the Department of Engineer- 
ing Extension. 

o 

NEW DEPARTMENT 

Trustee action has authorized the 
establishment of a new department ot 
Nature Study under the School of 
Education. Professor G. R. Green, who 
has had charge of this work in the 
Forestry department, heads the new 
unit. 



CALENDAR 



TUESDAY, September 23 

Registration Day. 

WEDNESDAY, September 24 

Opening convocation, 10.30, Audit- 
orium. Members of the faculty are 
asked to attend and occupy seats on 
the platform. The doors will open 
promptly at 10.15. 

THURSDAY. September 25 
College Senate, 7.30, Foyer of 
Auditorium. 

FRIDAY, September 26 
Y.M.C.A. reception for new students. 
7:00, Front Campus. 

SATURDAY, September 27 
Football, Penm, State vs. Lebanon 
Valley, 2:30, New Beaver. 

SUNDAY, September 28 
Chapel Speaker— Dr. J. M. Henry, 
piesident of Canton Christian College. 
Services at 11:00 a.m. and 0:30 p.m. 
MONDAY, September 29 
Council meeting, 10:00 a.m., Presid- 
ent's Office. 

DEPARTMENT HEADS 

All Heads of Departments are re- 
quested to advise the Bulletin Editor, 
175 Old Main, of all changes in their 
departmental staffs. This should be 
done in writing- as soon as possible so 
that the Bulletin mailing list can be 
revised before the next i.-sue. 



IMPOR T A N T CHANGES 

Trustee action last .Tune abolished 
the School of Natural Science and 
created in its stead the new School of 
Chemistry and Physics. In this 
change, the Department o>f Zoology 
was transferred to the School of Agri- 
culture where it will be known as the 
Department of Zoology and Ento- 
mology. The departments of Chemistry 
and Physics make up the new school. 

The name of the Department of 
Agricultural Education has been 
changed to Department of Rural Ed- 
ucation, and the Department of Chem- 
ical Agriculture has been renamed the 
Department of Agricultural and Bio- 
logical Chemistry. 

The name of the curriculum in 
Industrial Chemistry has been changed 
to Chemical Engineering. 



ADMISSIONS GRANTED 

The total number of prospective 
freshmen granted admission by the 
Registrar up to noon on Saturday was 
1035, every county but two being rep- 
resented. These admissions were by 
schools as follows: Agriculture (in- 
cluding Pre-Medical curriculum) 224; 
Chemistry and Physics, 52; Education 
84; Engineering 389; Liberal Arts 246; 
Mines 29; no choice 11. 



E . W. RUNKLE . 

car:: eg i e 



■ 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



VOLUME 4 



State College, Pa., September 30, 1924 



NUMBER 2 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



PRESIDENT'S RECEPTION 

All new members of the faculty and 
their wives and all members of the 
College Senate and their wives are 
irvited to an informal reception at the 
President's House on Friday evening, 
October 3, from 8:00 to 10:00. 



PERSONNEL OF COUNCIL 

The personnel of the Council of Ad- 
ministration is as follows: President 
Thomas; Comptroller R. H. Smith; 
Beans Ray, "Warnock, Watts, Wendt, 
Chambers, Sackett, Stoddart, and Hol- 
brook ; and Registrar Hoffman, secre- 
tary. 

o — 

OFFICE HOURS 

C. E. Bullinger, the College 'Schedul- 
ing Officer, will be at his desk in the 
Registrar's office each week on Monday, 
Tuesday and Friday mornings from 8:00 
to 12:00, and on Wednesday and Thurs- 
day afternoons from 1:30 to 5:00. 

o 

INSTRUCTORS' SCHEDULES 

Each member of the teaching staff 
is asked to send to the College Sched- 
uling Officer before October 4, a copy 
ot his actual schedule indicating the 
room — number and building — in which 
he is located at any given time. — C. 
E. Bullinger. 



SENATE COMMITTEES 

The following standing committees 
[of the College Senate have been ap- 
pointed by President Thomas, the first 
inamed in each case being chairman: 
I Admission: Hoffman, Knandel, C. 
Ii. Harris, Espenshade. 

I Athletics: Holbrook, Bezdek, Ham, 
{Keller, A. E. Martin. 

' Student Welfare: Fletcher, War- 
nock, Miss Ray, Foster, Dennis. 

Publications: Ctfesswell, Chedsey, 
'Parkinson, Wood. 

| Academic Standards : Dutcher, Kins- 
jloe, Pattee, Marquardt (College Exam- 
iner). 

| Courses of Study: Stoddart, Cham- 
bers, Ferguson, McFarland, P. B. 
jBreneman. 

j Research: Kern, Wendt, Boucke, 
■ E B. Forbes, Heckler. 

Instruction in Science: Chandlee. 
jHam, Kern, Dusham, Dutcher, Bo- 
jnine. 

""■■■ ■— — i— ■— — — — — •— i ^ __ _ 
ENROLLMENT 

; Although complete figures on the 
[enrollment are not yet available the 
[Registrar has announced that this will 
|be Penn State's banner year. It is as- 
sured that the total will go well over 
jthe 3400 mark. 



HONOR POINT SYSTEM 

According to the "Regulations Af- 
fecting Students" approved at the 
meeting of the College Senate last 
'week, the new system of honor points 
for graduation becomes effective this 
year as applied to the class of 192S 
and all subsequent classes. This is ai- 
red with the new grading system out- 
lined in last week's Bulletin. 

In order to graduate a student is 
'required to earn the number of credits 
fixed by his school and an equal num- 
ber of honor points. The grade of 
gives credit in the subject, but does 
not earn honor points for graduation. 
'The student to be eligible for gradu- 
ation must offset his grades of by 
grades of 2 or 3 in .sufficient number 
to make his honor points average 1 
or better. 

Any student who has not a suf- 
ficient proportion of honor points for 
graduation may obtain the same by 
repeating subjects in which honor 
points may not have been earned, or 
by taking additional subjects not .re- 
quired in his course, as may be ap- 
proved by his school. 

The maximum grade given for cred- 
its earned by a re-examination shall 
be not higher than 1. 



CALENDAR 



DR. PATTEE HONORED 

Dr. Fred Lewis Pattee, who returns 
to Penn State this fall as head of the 
Department of English after a year's 
leave of absence, was the honor guest 
at a testimonial dinner at the Uni- 
versity Club last Saturday night ar- 
ranged under the auspices of the local 
branch of the American Association 
of University Professors. 

Dr. Pattee has served the college 
for thirty years and is one of the four 
oldest faculty members in point of 
service. Dr. E. W. Runkle, now the 
o'ldest faculty member, acted as? toast- 
master at the dinner and the speak- 
er.- included President Thomas, Dr. I. 
L.. Foster, Dr. W. S. Dye, Jr., Pro- 
fessor Borland, J. 'II. Holmes, and the 
Rev. Samuel Martin. 



STUDIED PENN'A HIGHWAYS 

Professor J. E. Kaulfuss, in charge 
o: the highway instruction work of 
the Civil Engineering department, 
spent the past summer as a supervis- 
ing material inspector for the Statj 
Department of Highways. The work 
necessitated travelling over the entire 
state and he was thus able to gather 
first hand information concerning the 
h.'ghway situation in Pennsylvania. 

o — 

COPY OF REGULATIONS 

All members of the faculty may ob- 
tain a copy of the new edition of 
"Regulations Affecting Students" by 
calling at the office of the Registrar, 
or of the Dean of Men. 



FRIDAY, October 3 

President's Reception, 8:00 to 10:00 
p. m., President's House. 

SATURDAY, October 4 
Football, Penn State vs. North Car- 
olina State, 2:30, New Beaver. 
SUNDAY, October 5 
Chapel Speaker - - Dr. Alfred J-3. 
Steam-:, Principal, Phillips Acaden./. 
Anduver, Massachusetts. 



FACULTY GET PASS- HOOKS 

Members of the faculty and adm'n- 
Mrative staff are once more indeb ed 
to the Athletic Association for the 
courtesy extended through the issu- 
ance of the complimentary pass-books 
hi athletic contests. Penn State is one 
of few institutions where this custom 
is followed and the Bulletin wishes to 
cenvey the thanks of the faculty to 
the Athletic Association. 



ATTEND MEETING 

A number of faculty members were 
in attendance at the annual fall meet- 
ing of The American Chemical Socie- 
ty held recently at Ithaca. N. Y. 
Among them were Dean Wendt and 
Professors Chandlee and Currier of 
the School of Chemistry and Physics, 
ami Professors Dutcher, Pierce, Lisse, 
A. K. Anderson, Shuey, and Reider, of 
the Department of Agricultural and Bi- 
ological Chemistry. Professor Dutch- 
er. was elected chairman of the Di- 
vision of Biological Chemistry for the 
year 1924-25. 

o 

PAPER TO BE READ 

Dean E. A. Holbrook of the School 
of Mines was scheduled to give an 
address before the National Conven- 
tion of the American Mining Congress 
at Sacramento, California, on October 
2. Being unable to attend, his ad- 
dress on "Coordination of Mining 
Standards and Methods'' will be rend 
by a substitute. 



MAILING LIST REYISED 

The Bulletin mailing list has been 
revised as far as possible, although a 
number of department heads have not 
a., yet complied with the request of 
last week to advise the Editor of nil 
changes in their staff personnel. This 
should be done at once in writing, 
giving both the new members ad.^d 
and the old who have resigned. 

DATE IS CHANGED 

By action of the College Senate at 
its August meeting, the date of 
Scholarship Day for this fall was 
changed from Tuesday, November 4, to 
Monday, November 3. 



E.W.RUNKLE , 

2 1 LIBERA L A R T S 



3 



7 ! 



/:.-•. 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



VOLUME 4 



State College, Pa., October 7, 1924 



NUMBER 3 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

RETURN FACULTY BLANKS 

Faculty members who have not al- 
ready filled out the official list sheet for 
the President's Office are asked to do 
so at once. This information is needed 
for the Faculty and Student Directory 
which is to be sent to the printer at 
the earliest possible moment. This 
notice is important, so read, heed, and 
act. 

STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

Since the opening- of college the fol- 
lowing' students have withdrawn: 

3 Caulk. Daniel E., AE 

4 Chueca, Bernardo, Ag 

1 Gutowski, Arthur J., AE 

3 Gleason, John C, PL 

4 Hattman, Henry H., Chem 
4 Murphy, Tom, CF 

4 Murphy, William S., EE 
4 Phillips, Thelma C, Ag 
4 Powis, Russell T., PL 
4 Sporcic, 'Stephen Z., Ed 

3 Storeh, Walter C, CF 

4 Thomas, Elias G., CF 

3 Thomas, Richard H., CF 



o- 



SUGGEiSTIONS WANTED 

At the September meeting- of the Col- 
lege Senate, its members agreed to go 
over the "Regulations Affecting Stud- 
ents," recently published, and at later 
imeetings .to consider changes which 
'should be made in the body, details, 
Hid phrasing of any of these rules. 
i As chairman of the committee in 
Charge of this work, I shall be glad to 
receive suggestions and comments that 
liny member of the general faculty and 
jidministrative staffs may wish to make. 
. rhe comments of the newer members Df 
[he faculty may be especially help- 
ful for two reasons: First, being un- 
acquainted with past practice at 
iPenn State, they may find rules that 
lire not sufficiently clear to the new 
reader; and second, having been con- 
nected with other institutions, they 
jnay be able to suggest for consideration 
possible improvements on our proced- 
ure in various cases.— A. R. Warnack, 
pean of Men. 



TOTAL ENROLLMENT 

J The total enrollment for this fall as of 
l^iday, October 3, is 3443, according to 
|V. S. Hoffman, Registrar of the College, 
t summary of enrollment by schools and 
lurricula will be given in the Bulletin 
ext -weejs. 



SENATE MEMBERS 

The complete membership of the 
College Senate for the year 1924-35 is 
as follows: 

General Administrative Officers : J.M. 
Thomas, President;; R. H. Smith, 
Comptroller; A. R. Warnock, Dean 
of Men; Miss Charlotte E. Ray, 
Dean of Women; Hugo Bezdek, Phys- 
ical Education; Clenard McLaughlin, 
Military -Science and Tactics; J. P. Rit- 
enour, College Physician; Miss Sabra 
W. Vought, Librarian; E. B. Forbes, 
Director, Institute of Animal Nutrition; 
M. S. McDowell, Director of Agricultu- 
ral Extension; W. S. Hoffman, Regist- 
rar and Secretary of the Senate; and 

C. E. Maruuardt, College Examiner. 
School of Agriculture: R. L. Watts, 

Dean; R. U. Blasingame, A. A. Borland, 
R. G. Bressler, E. H. Dusham, R. A. 
Dutcher, J. A. Ferguson, S. W. Fletcher, 

E. D. Gardner, F. D. Kern, H. C. Knan- 
del, W. H. Tomhave, A. L. Beam (elec- 
ted), W. V. Dennis (elected), F. N. 
Fagan (elected). 

School of Chemistry and Physics: G. 
L. Wendt, Dean; G. C. Chandlee, W- R- 
Ham, A. J. Currier (elected), D. C. Dun- 
ran (elected), L. R. Parks (elected). 

School of Education: W. G. Chambers, 
Dean; Miss Edith P. Chace, A. S. Hur- 
rell, H. -G. Parkinson, D. A. Anderson, 
G. R. Green, J. E. DeCamp (elected), 
C: Everett Myers (elected). Miss S. M. 
Wilson (elected). 

School of Engineering: R. L. Sackett, 
Dean; P. B. Breneman, C. L. Harris, 

F. G. Heckler, J. O. Keller, C. L. Kin- 
sloe, E. D. Walker, A. J. Wood, H. A. 
Everett (elected), C. E. Govier (elec- 
ted), H. B. Shattuck (elected). 

School of Mines: E. A. Holbrook, 
Dean ; C. A. Bonine, W. R. Chedsey, 

D. F. McFarland, J. B. Shaw, P. B. 
Eucky (elected), O. A. Knight (elec- 
ted), C. W. Robinson (elected). 

School of the Liberal Arts: C. W- 
Ntoddart, Dean; O. F. Boucke, W. D. 
Crockett, I. L. Foster, R. W. Grant, A. 

E. Martin, F. L. Pattee, E. W. Runkle, 
Miss L. V. T. Simmons, C. C. Wagner, 
W. S. Dye, Jr., (elected), C. W. Hasek 
(elected), J. H. Tudor (elected). 

o 

SEATS FOR FACULTY 

At the Sunday Chapel exercises, fac- 
ulty members and visitors are asked to 
take seats in the balcony, the section 
nearest the stage on the left hand side 
as you enter being reserved for this 
purpose. All other seats are assigned 
to students. 



CALENDAR 



FRIDAY, October 10 

Faculty reception at the University 
Club, 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. 

SATURDAY, October 11 

Football, Penn Sltate freshmen vs. 
Carnegie Tech freshmen. Old Beaver, 
1:00; Penn State vs. Gettysburg, New 
Beaver. 2:30. 

The Barber of Seville, Auditorium, 
8:15. 

SUNDAY, October 12 

Chapel Speaker — Colonel John T. 
Axton, Chief of Chaplains, U. S. Army, 
Washington, DC. 

THURSDAY, October 10 

College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Audit- 
orium. 

FIRST «Y" COURSE NUMBER 

The first number in the annual Y.M. 
C.A. and Department of Music enter- 
tainment course is scheduled for Sat- 
urday evening, October 11, in the Aud- 
itorium. "The Barber of Seville" is to 
be the initial offering and it promises 
to be one of the best of the year. Tick- 
ets may lie obtained at the "Y" Hut 
either for this performance or for the 
entire course. 



TO GIVE READINGS 

Miss Grace Sage, noted reader, will 
present "Peg O' My Heart" and other 
selections in the Auditorium on Thurs- 
day evening, October 16, at 8:15, under 
the auspices of the drama section of 
the -State College Women's Club. Tick- 
ets are on sale at the news stand in the 
Nittany Printing Company Building, 
West College Avenue. Price 50 and 75 
cents. 

COLLEGE MEAT FOR SALE 

The Department of Animal Husband- 
ry announces that the retail meat shop 
in the basement of the iStock Judging 
Pavilion will be open each morning 
from 10:00 to 12:00. An exceptionally 
fine lot of baby beeves will be sold over 
the block during the semester, as well 
as young porkers and -plump spring 
lambs. Faculty members are also s:d- 
\ r ised to try Ithe department's well 
known Philadelphia scrapple. 

o 

FACULTY RECEPTION 

The annual formal reception of the 
University Club to all members of ithe 
faculty will take place on Friday even- 
ing, October 10, from 8:00 to 10:00 at 
the club house. 



«9 V 0^ 

V4 * V 



GV.-C 



s kb 



I 1 -* 



***** 



Published every Tuesday 
du.'ing the college year as a 
mc.in- f making official an- 
no n e ents and presenting 
..cms of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. \V. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



VOLUME 4 



State College, Pa., October 14, 1924 



NUMBER 4 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



COLLEGE SENATE 

The regular meeting of the College 
Berate will take place on Thursday 
evening, October 16, at 7:30, in the 
Foyer of the Auditorium. 

o 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 
There will be a meeting of the fac- 
ilty of the School of Education on 
ruesday, October 14, at 4:30, in Room 
121, Old Main. — H. G. Parkinson, sec- 
etary. 

o 

STUDENT REINSTATED 
The following student has been re- 
instated in college: 
4 Powis, Russell T„ PL 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
indents have left college: 
4 Allen, Ray E., Ed 
4 Brenner, Harry, PL 

3 Mando, Joseph, CE 

? Matlavage, E. J., PM 

4 Milsom, Joseph C, SE 
£ Witmer, Frank C, ME 



DEPARTMENT HEADS NOTE 

In the letter sent out recently by 
iie Scheduling Officer giving enroll- 
tent figures there were listed 72 Two- 
car Agricultural students. This num- 
jer is made up as follows: 

1st For 8 

2nd For 4 

1st Ag 31 

2ndAg 37 



ADDRESS CHANGES 

Faculty members who previously 
?ported temporary addresses on the 
ifhcial list blanks returned to the 
president's Office, and who have sine. 1 
eeome permanently located, either as 
h home or office, should advise the 
president's Office at once so that cor- 
betions can be made on the proof of 

ie directory. 

SYRACUSE TICKETS 

Faculty members who have not yet 
'?cured order blanks for the Svracuse 
i>otball game on Home-Coming Day 
-ould call at the ticket window in the 
thletic Association office, second floor 
! Old Main, at once to obtain the 
pie. 

.These blanks, properly filled out and 
I'ntaining number 8 coupon for ex- 
ji&nge on faculty complimentary priv- 
|Jge and check for any additional 
i2kets desired, must be returned to 
! K A. A. office by noon on Wednesday, 
jitober 15, at the latest. 
|The tickets will be issued at the 
pket window on Monday, October 20. 
Married members of the faculty who 
pure two tickets on their coupon 
[ould write across the face of the 
lupon "Mr. and Mrs " 



ENROLLMENT FIGURES 

ANNOUNCED BY REGISTRAR 

The following summary of enroll- 
ment by schools and curricula has 
been compiled by the Registrar: 

School of Agricnlturc 

Agriculture 97 

Two-year Course 72 

Agricultural Economics 54 

Agronomy 32 

Animal Husbandry 41 

Botany 5 

Chem. Agriculture 40 

Dairy Husbandry 82 

Farm Forestry 58 

Horticulture 59 

Landscape Architecture 34 

Poultry Husbandry 14 

Pre Medical 172 

700 
Chemistry and Physics 

Chemistry , 48 

Chemical Engineering S4 

Natural Science 27 

Physics -i 

1G3 
Education 

Agricultural Education 55 

Arts and Science Ed 211 

Home Economics 70 

Vocational Home Ec 62 

Industrial Education 5 

401 
Engineering' 

Achitecture 38 

Architectural Eng 65 

Civil Eng 222 

Sanitary Eng 8 

Electrical Eng 353 

Cch. Eng 144 

Industrial Eng 144 

Mechanical Eng. 217 

Milling Eng 4 

Railroad Mech. Eng 16 

1113 
Liberal Arts 

Arts and Letters 293 

Commerce and Finance 395 

Pre Legal ....: 144 

800 
Mines 

Ceramics 6 

Metallurgy 43 

Mining 92 

Mining Geology 21 



Probation H 

Total students this fall 3443 

Grand total last year, 3485. 



CALENDAR 



THURSDAY, Oct. IB 

College Senates 7:30 .Foyer of Audi- 
torium- 
Miss Grace Sage, reader, in "Peg 
C My Heart," Auditorium, 8:15. Tick- 
ets. 50 and 75 cents. 

FRIDAY, Oct. 17 

Ladies' Night at University Club. 
Dinner, dancing and cards. Reserva- 
tions for dinner must be mad:- with 
the steward not later than Wednesday. 

SATURDAY, Oct. 18 

Football returns, Penh StMe-Georgia 
Tech, Auditorium, 3:00. 

SUNDAY, Oct. 19 

Chapel Speaker— (Dr. Jason Noble 
Pierce, First Congregational Church. 
Washington, D. C. 

FACULTY GROUPS TO VISIT 

A plan has been proposed whereby 
the faculty members of each school 
will visit the various other schools of 
the College in order to become more 
familiar with the general work of the 
'institution. The first of these visits 
is scheduled for Saturday, October IS, 
from 2:00 to 4:00 p. m. 

The School of Agriculture and In- 
stitute of Animal Nutrition will enter- 
tain the Liberal Arts, Education, and 
one-half the Engineering faculties. 
These Avill meet in the office of Dean 
Watts in the Agricultural building. 

The School of Engineering will en- 
tertain the Chemistry and Physics, 
Mines, and one-half the Agricultural 
faculties. They will meet in Engineer- 
ing A, the building nearest Allen 
Street. 

Further details of these visits may 
be secured from the dean of your 
school. 



FOOTBALL RETURNS 

Telegraphic returns of the Penn 
State-Georgia Tech football game at 
Atlanta on Saturday will be given in 
the Auditorium, starting at three 
o'clock. The time at Atlanta is one 
hour slower than in State College 
which accounts for the lateness in 
starting. 

v— o 

SCHOOL LUNCH REOPENS 

Beginning Tuesday, October 14, 
S'-hool lunch will be served by the sen- 
ior Home Ee-onoiriss students in Room 
14 of the Womei ® Building at 12:15 
en Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, 
and Fridays. Anyone .wishing a hot 
noon meal is welcome. Customers who 
fro more or less regular will be ap- 
preciated and an endeavor will ba 
made, as far as possible, to take spec- 
ial care of them. 



E.W.RONKLE . 

2 I L IBERAL ARTS 
















< 



■ 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



VOLUME 4 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



SCHOOL FACULTY MEETING 

There will be a meeting of the faculty 
3f the School of Chemistry and Phys- 
ics on Wednesday, October 22, at 4:30 
in Room 28 of the Physics Building. 
— G. C. Ohandlee, secretary. 



FACULTY INVITED 

All members of the faculty are giv- 
hn a cordial invitation to attend the 
[ilumni smoker to be held in the Arm- 
pry on Saturday evening at 8:00. The 
bccasion will be most informal, being 
|i get-together of alumni, faculty, and 
piends for the renewing of old acquain- 
tances. 
i 

RELIUIOLS PREFERENCES 

The Registrar has completed a tab- 
nation of the religious preferences of 
he entire student body as indicated on 
he enrollment blanks .this fall. No 
ess than 26 denominations are repres- 
'"i:ed. The Presbyterians are in the 
lead with a total of 831 students, while 
he iMethodists are a close second with 
69. Four denominations are tied for 
he lowest position, each having one 
tudent. The preferences are as fol- 
ows: 

i Presbyterian 831 

j Methodist 769 

I Lutheran 455 

1 Roman Catholic 365 

] Reformed 253 

j Episcopal 194 

I Baptist 139 

i Hebrew 102 



Evangelical 

Friends 

United Brethren . 

Christian 

Christian Science 
Congregationalist 



62 
52 
43 
26 
20 
19 



Church of the Brethren 14 



'; Unitarian 

i Moravian 

Church of Christ _ 

I Mennonite 

I Church of God ... 

' Disciple 

| Russian Orthodox 

i Adventist 

; Schwenkfelder 

| 'Swedenborgan 

Universalist 

Protestant 

No preference 



7 
6 
4 
4 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
26 
62 

3464 



State College, Pa., October 21, 1924 



NUMBER 5 



ON LEAVES OF ABSENCE 

The following members of the fac- 
ulty are on leaves of absence for the 
academic year 1924-25. 

H. H. Arnold, Assistant Professor of 
Romance Languages, at Harvard Uni- 
versity. 

Miss Ella J. Day, Assistant Professor 
of Domestic Science, at Merrill-Palmer 
School, Detroit, Michigan. 

VV. G. Edwards, Professor of Lum- 
bering, at University of California. 

D. M. Gray, Assistant Professor of 
t'oultry Husbandry Extension, at Uni- 

ersity of Wisconsin. 

L'. P. Henshall, Assistant Professor 
of Machine Shop Practice, at Atlantic 
City, X. J., as factory manager with J. 
J. Xesbitt Company. 

F. C. Hudson, Instructor in Physics, 
i Harvard University. 

A, L. Kocher, Professor of Architec- 
. e, on Sabbatical Leave to do re- 
■earch work in early American arch- 
itecture. 

Mi lis Jeannette Leatherman, Instruct- 
in Home Economics Extension. 

'.■:. D. McCarthy, Instructor in Math- 
e.natics, at University of Chicago. 

L. M. Morris, Assistant Professor of 
Mechanics and Materials of Construc- 
ion, at Altoona in Pennsylvania Rail- 
road Testing Laboratory. 

E. L. Nixon, Professor of Plant Path- 
ology Extension, on Sabbatical Leave 
(o do research work in Pennsylvania. 

F. O. Norte, Instructor in French, at 
Harvard University. 

Miss Marion C. Ricker, Instructor 
in Home Economics Extension, at Col- 
umbia University. 

Miss Helen K. Rogers, Instructor in 
Home Economics Extension. 

J. H. Waring, Assistant Professor of 
Experimental Pomology, at Michigan 
Agricultural College. 

F. P. Weaver, Professor of Agricul- 
tural Extension, on Sabbatical Leave 
to do graduate work at Cornell Univer- 
sity. 

J. T. Larkins, Instructor in Engin- 
eering Drawing, at Phoenixville, Pa., 
with the Phoenix Bridge Company. 

Miss Mildred A. Ai'lman, Library As- 
sistant, at Simmons College. 



Dr. A. E. Martin, of the history de- 
artment lectured last week at the 
loKean County Teachers' Institute. 



AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY 

Dr. James Kendall, professor of 
chemistry at Columbia University, will 
address the local section of the Amer- 
ican Chemical Society on Thursday, 
October 23, at 7:30 in the Physics Lec- 
ture Room. His subject will be 
"Isotopes." 



CALENDAR 



SATURDAY, October 25 

Alumni Home-coming Day. Athletic 
events: Penn State vs. Syracuse, -soc- 
cer, 10:00, New Beaver; State Fresh- 
men vs. Kiski, football, 10:00, Old 
Beaver; Penn State vs. Syracuse, foot- 
ball, 2:30, New Beaver. 

Smoker in Armory, 8:00. 

SUNDAY, October 26 

Chapel Speaker — Dr. C. A. Barbour, 
Rochester Theological Seminary, R. Ch- 
ester, X.Y. 

ATTEND MEETINGS 

Miss Edith P. Chace, director of the 
Home Economics department, was in 
attendance at the annual conventions 
of the State Federation of Pennsylvania 
Women and of the American Associa- 
tion of College Women, held in Phila- 
delphia last week. As chairman of 
the home economics committee, she 
gave a report at the former gathering. 

Miss Louise Moss and Miss Evelyn 
Smith represented the department at 
the annual meeting of the American 
Dietetics Association at S'waiwpscott, 
Mass., last week. 



NEW BOOK BY DEAN WATTS 

The Macmillan Company has an- 
nounced the publication of a new book 
by Dean R. iL. Watts, of the School of 
Agriculture. It is called "Rural Penn- 
sylvania" and is the fifth volume in 
the Rural State and Province Series 
edited by 'L. H. Bailey. The book ex- 
plains the nature of the rural civil- 
ization and institutions of the state, 
thr character of its agriculture and 
country life, and the physical features 
of the state on which the rural life 
is based. 



USE THE BULLETIN 

The attention of all members of the 
faculty is called to the fact that the 
Bulletin is published in their behalf. 
News items of general interest, person- 
al or otherwise, are always welcome 
and will invariably be used if space 
will permit. All notices should reach 
the Editor, 175 Old Main, by Friday 
afternoon of each week in order to make 
sure of publication in the following 
issue. Last minute notices will be re- 
ceived up to 11:00 a.m. on Saturday. 



DEAN SACKETT TO SPEAK 

At the fall meeting of the American 
Society of Civil Engineers at Detroit 
this week, Dean R. L. Sackett will give 
an illustrated address before the san- 
itary engineering division on "Recent 
Developments in English Sewage 
Treatment." 



E . W . R U N KL£, 

21 libef: a l a r t s 









W/t/i 






: 



I 







THE COLLEGE LEGISLATIVE BUDGET 

Report of Committee on Budget Approved and Adopted by Executive Committee of Board 

of Trustees, October 23rd, 1924 



The Board of Trustees, 

The Pennsylvania State College. 

Gentlemen: 

By action of the Executive Committee of the Board of 
Trustees approved by your body on June 9, 1924, a Com- 
mittee consisting of the President of the Board, the Pres- 
ident of the College and the Comptroller was empowered 
to prepare the budget for submission to the 1925 session 
of the Legislature in request of appropriation to the Col- 
lege for the biennium 1925-1927. 

Your Committee, in cooperation with the Deans of the 
Schools and other administrative officers of the College, 
has completed the budget in detail and submitted it in 
summary to the budget officers of the Commonwealth. 

The appropriation proposed for the biennium 1925-1927 

is $6,323,220 which compares with the last appropriation 

as follows: 

Proposed 
1923-1925 1925-1927 

General Maintenance, all functions 

except special items below $1,613,600 $3,360,932 

Agricultural Research including to- 
bacco experiments 55,000 355,746 

Agricultural Extension 500,000 605,542 



September 22, 1924. Year *State Appropriation "Enrollment Students Refused 



Total Maintenance 
New Buildings 

Grand Total 



2,168,600 4,323,220 
2,000,000 



$2,168,600 $6,323,220 



Prior to the last session of the State Legislature the 
College published a detailed and comprehensive analysis 
of its financial condition. At that time the following state- 
ment was made: 

"The program of the College has been under-financed 
for years. Penn State has been on starvation diet. 
The effects are evident both in salaries and plant main- 
tenance, which constitute the bulk of college opera- 
tion expense. During the critical business conditions 
of the past six years the situation of the College be- 
came more acute. Everything possible was done to 
save the instructing staff by salary increases; plant 
maintenance and educational equipment were sacri- 
ficed to this necessary end. State appropriations to 
the College were increased for the biennium 1919- 
1921, but they were far from compensating. A 33 per 
cent, increase in student enrollment since 1918 has 
only operated to continue the straitened conditions 
and to impose an extra heavy load on the teaching 
staff." 

The appropriation received by the College for the cur- 
rent biennium failed to relieve this condition. In fact, it 
was less than sufficient to maintain the program of the 
College on the basis of the preceding biennium and it was 
necessary to increase the student fees to prevent a serious 
curtailment of the services of the institution. 

The following table showing State appropriations, en- 
rollment, and admissions refused indicates the inadequacy 
of income over a period of years when the value of the 
dollar was steadily decreasing and the demands on the 
College steadily increasing. 



1915 


450,000 


2,400 


250 


1916 


450,000 


2,489 


340 


1917 


467,500 


2,184 


350 


1918 


487,500 


2,488 


650 


1919 


625,000 


3,172 


450 


1920 


625,000 


3,128 


1,098 


1921 


800,000 


3,161 


828 


1922 


800,000 


3,052 


628 


1923 


800,000 


3,377 


900 



*Exclusive of Extension, Summer Session and Buildings 
"Exclusive of Summer Session and Extension 

The financial problem of the College today, therefore, 
remains unchanged from that of two years ago and the 
appropriation requested of the 1925 Session of the Legis- 
lature must of necessity be the same in its essentials. 

An exposition of the financial problems and needs of 
the College can not be presented adequately in terms of 
State appropriations, for the reason that the income of the 
institution includes also receipts from the federal govern- 
ment, student fees, and sales. Therefore, in making this 
presentation of the situation the figures given below for 
expenditure represent gross budgets regardless of the 
sources of income. 

The following statement shows the gross budget of the 
College in its main divisions as the College is now operat- 
ing, contrasted with the budget proposed for the next bi- 
ennium: — 

SUMMARY OF GROSS 



Expenditure: 

All Resident Instruction 

All Research 

All Extension 

Carnegie Library Maintenance 

General Administration, etc. 

Plant Maintenance and Operation 

Total Operation 
New Buildings: 

Grand Total 
Income: 

From State 

From Federal Government 

From Students 

From Sales of Products 

From Miscellaneous Sources 



$4,803,223 $8,762,334 

At this point it should be noted that the budget proposed 
for 1925-1927 contemplates no new educational departures. 
The increases requested are designated, — 

1. To establish an adequate support for those factors 
which have been seriously under-financed during the 
past eight years; 

2. To provide for the normal development of those pro- 
jects in which the economic demand for the services 
of the College is urgently and continuously pressing. 

The first concern of the College is to provide sufficient 
funds to correct those deficiencies of the expenditure bud- 





Proposed 


1923-1925 


1925-1927 


$2,370,238 $3,517,472 


320,430 


650,571 


1,332,012 


1,519,299 


44,100 


81,915 


233,556 


321,756 


432,954 


671,319 


$4,733,290 $6,762,332 


59,738 


2,000,000 


$4,793,028 $8,762,332 


$2,228,338 $6,323,220 


887,014 


886,014 


1,106,086 


1,100,000 


360,481 


340,000 


224,304 


113,100 



get which affect the basic factors in operation. As the 
College is now operating these deficiencies appear in, — 

An inadequate academic salary scale, 
An excessive teaching load, 
A costly rate of depreciation in physical plant, 
An insufficient demonstrational and experimental equip- 
ment for effective and up-to-date instruction. 

The Salary Scale 

Salary conditions will be best appreciated after a view 
of the characteristics of College organization and of the 
types of personnel. 

The academic staff falls into two general groups: the 
"key" positions comprising department heads, professors 
and associate professors; the "apprentices" embracing 
the assistant professors and instructors. The minor ranks 
of "assistant" and "graduate assistant" are adjuncts to 
the faculty organization, but are comparatively few in 
number and are short term positions. 

The first general group is the one which determines 
the worth and strength of the institution and in which, 
once strongly staffed, permanence of tenure is desired. 
Out of the second group the College seeks to find and 
train some of its key men and women of the future. Per- 
manence of tenure is not to be sought here as a general 
proposition. A reasonable turnover is desirable for the 
good of both College and individual. 

The distribution of numbers to each of these two groups 
and the qualifications sought for each of the academic 
ranks are matters of fundamental importance. 

In an institution offering a wide variety of technical 
curricula fifty per cent, of the staff in most departments 
should be of the rank of associate professor and higher. 
In departments where large numbers of underclassmen 
are handled in the simpler basic subjects this percentage 
might be slightly lower. The present situation in this 
respect contrasted with the proposals in the budget for 
1925-1927 is as follows: 

Per cent, of staff in Ranks of Department Head, Professor 
or Associate: 

Agri. Engr. Mines. Lib. Arts Ch. & Phy's Educa. 

Present 51 35 46 23 36 52 

Proposed 53 33 53 42 47 49 

In the selection of personnel for the several academic 
ranks it is not practicable to devise a definite set of stand- 
ards for personal characteristics and previous profes- 
sional record, but it is safe to set certain minimum re- 
quirements with respect to formal academic training and 
professional achievements and standing from which there 
should be few departures, if any. In the "key" group of 
department heads, professors and associate professors, 
every member of the staff should have earned the Ph.D. 
degree or the advanced technical degree in the case of the 
engineering divisions, should be affiliated with at least 
one outstanding national scientific, technical or profes- 
sional society related to his educational field, and should 
have contributed something of worth to the field of knowl- 
edge in which he has specialized. In the "apprentice" 
group, the assistant professor should have earned the M. 
S. or M.A. degree, and both assistant professor and in- 
structor should be expected to show progress toward the 
requirements for the higher academic ranks. An analysis 
of the personnel records of the present College staff with 
respect to the qualifications referred to above is as follows: 



Dept. Asso. Asst. 

Heads Prof. Prof. Prof. Instr. 

Average Age 43 43 38 35 28 

Years of Professional Exper- 
ience 20 19 15 11 5 

Percentage with Master's 

Degree 79 83 82 80 35 

Percentage with Ph.D. Degree 31 42 25 8 

Percentage in membership in 
National Scientific or Pro- 
fessional Societies 100 100 97 77 54 

Percentage who have written 

for publication 89 60 61 44 16 

Percentage who have con- 
ducted special researches 89 75 64 52 32 
The College does not expect to realize the foregoing 

ideals in one stride. The proposals of the budget for 1925- 

1927 are a practical approach to the ideal. 

The Teaching Load: 

For each credit hour of instruction a teacher must put 
in, on the average, three clock hours of work, including 
preparation for the class, time with the class and exam- 
ination of quiz papers. Where the nature of the instruc- 
tion calls for conferences with individual students, each 
credit hour will call for more than three clock hours of 
work. Department conferences and administrative work 
and faculty committee assignments further increase the 
actual time required of the teacher per credit hour. An 
efficient Faculty can not be maintained if the teaching 
load is so heavy as to forbid opportunity for research and 
scientific advancement. 

On this basis a maximum of 12 to 13 credit hours per 
week for instructors and assistant professors, 10 to 11 
for associate professors and 8 to 9 for professors is a 
normal load for effective work. The lighter credit hour 
load for professors and associate professors is necessary, 
because upon this group falls the burden of department 
administration, stimulation and direction of research, and 
supervision of younger members of the staff. 

A second factor in teaching load is the number of stu- 
dents per section. The maximum for effective instruction 
is 30 per recitation section and 20 per laboratory section. 

At present 36 per cent, of the entire academic staff is 
carrying an excess of 13 credit hours per week, the load 
in some instances reaching 20 to 23. The burden of this 
overload is carried by professors and associate professors 
— 67 per cent, of them carrying overloads. Twenty-two 
per cent, of all class sections are in excess of the normal 
size. In History and Economics class sections are held 
numbering as high as 250. 

These conditions prevail to some extent in all schools 
with the most severe loads in the schools of Engineering, 
Chemistry and Physics, and Liberal Arts. The budget 
proposals for 1925-1927 aim to restore teaching loads to 
normal by the addition of new teachers in the departments 
most affected. 

Plant Maintenance 

In the effort to maintain an effective academic personnel 
during the period of increasing costs and practically fixed 
income it has been impossible to retain an equitable dis- 
tribution of expense to all elements of operation cost, 
and the burden of sacrifice has fallen on plant mainte- 
nance and educational equipment. 

The buildings of the College represent a replacement 
value of approximately $4,000,000. Half of this sum is in 



structures more than twenty years old which are of a 
type not as durable as those of recent years and which, 
consequently, now have a high depreciation rate. An aver- 
age annual allowance for building repairs of 2 per cent, 
of valuation should be the absolute minimum for the par- 
ticular case of this College. Such a sum, — $80,000 — is al- 
most three times the money available for repairs during 
the current year. 

Roof repairs and painting are the most pressing items. 
The destructive effect on other parts of a structure as 
a result of deferred repairs to roofs and painted surfaces 
is well known. Not a single building on the campus has 
been completely painted on the exterior in at least seven 
years, — painting every three or four years is the econ- 
omic practice. A complete replacement of roofs on the 
Armory, the main section of the Woman's Building and 
four of the cottage dormitories, and major repairs to the 
roofs of the Carnegie Library and the Liberal Arts build- 
ing are now imperative. 

During the past sixteen years the College has purchased 
six farms. The buildings on all of them were old and in 
bad state of repair. Only one has been completely re- 
habilitated. 

On the main campus there are three miles of main road- 
way with an additional four miles through the farm prop- 
erty. None of this has ever been put into a durable type 
of construction. Under present traffic conditions tempo- 
rary repairs are uneconomical and do not yield satisfac- 
tory results. A complete new system of hard surfaced 
roadways is the solution and the necessity. 

Less than 40 per cent, of the main inter-building walks 
is of concrete construction. The remainder is in crushed 
cinders. The maintenance of the latter is uneconomical 
and in addition increases floor maintenance costs in the 
buildings to which the cinder walks lead. 

Campus street lighting, landscaping, and fire protection 
equipment are other outstanding items in need of larger 
maintenance appropriations. 

Equipment 

Large accessions of equipment representing the accum- 
ulation of the deferred purchases of six years for instruc- 
tion and research purposes, particularly in the schools of 
Engineering and Agriculture, are urgent if the quality 
of work done is not to be materially affected. The need 
covers both replacements and additions of live stock, 
apparatus, and machinery. 

Normal Development of Program 

As stated previously the budget proposed for 1925-1927 
contemplates no new educational departures. Demands 
upon the College for certain elements of its service, how- 
ever, can not be met without additional funds for staff, 
equipment and supplies. The amplification of several of 
the courses in Agriculture, Education, Chemistry, and 
Economics, and the provision of larger opportunities in 
graduate study, constitute the principal demands in in- 
struction. 

A material enlargement of the agricultural research 
program makes up the major part of the entire proposal 
for program development. The following list is suggestive, 
which is by no means complete, of the investigations which 
the College is being called upon to undertake: — 

Soil survey of four counties, 

Fertilizer experiments on additional soil types, 



Chemical study of relation of soils and fertilizers to 
quality of tobacco, 

Mineral requirements for swine, horses, and dairy cat- 
tle and rations for sheep, 
Control of sheep parasites, 
Methods of curing meats for home use, 
Control of fire blight and collar rot of apples, 
Survey of diseases of forest trees and ornamental plants, 
Disease prevention in fruits and vegetables in trans- 
portation and storage, 
Improvement of pastures, 
Bacteriological studies of dairy products, 
Improved methods of dairy production and manufacture, 
Economic studies in Pennsylvania market conditions and 
farm products distribution, 
Feeding of young chicks, 
Diseases of poultry, 

New Buildings 

The schedule of new buildings proposed covers only 
those which are immediately needed for relief of conges- 
tion and improper housing. 

Main Engineering Building (restoration) 

Botany Unit 

Home Economics Laboratory 

Mining Laboratory unit 

Chemistry Laboratory unit 

Greenhouses (Horticulture) 

Horse, Sheep, and Hog barns 

Granary, and farm service units 

General storeroom and repair shops 

Grounds and Buildings maintenance equipment sheds 

and barns 

Pumping Station and water lines 

Refuse incinerator 

Subsequent to the fire of 1918 the shop and laboratory 
elements of the old Main Engineering Building were re- 
stored from the proceeds of the insurance fund plus a 
small State appropriation. The classroom and office ele- 
ments could not be provided with the funds available. This 
remains to be done. 

Botany is now housed in a small two story structure 
erected in 1888 with additional space in a temporary build- 
ing. None of the quarters are adapted to the work and 
all are overcrowded. Facilities for botany limit the en- 
rollment in agriculture. 

Home Economics laboratories are in the makeshift 
quarters in an old building designed for dormitories. Quar- 
ters are not adapted to the work and are congested. Many 
girls are refused admission because of this situation. 

The mining laboratories with their valuable equipment 
are now housed in a temporary frame building which is 
unadaptable, poorly lighted, and a serious fire risk. 

Chemistry is basic to practically all courses in the Col- 
lege. The limit of capacity has been reached. This is the 
"neck of the bottle" as to admission of more students. 
The old chemistry building and the "annex" are serious 
fire hazards. A second unit of the Pond Memorial Labor- 
atory is proposed. 

No further progress can be made in a major part of the 
work in both horticultural instruction and research until 
additional greenhouse space is provided. 

The imminent removal of the decrepit West Barns 
makes a new sheep barn imperative. Satisfactory housing 
for horses and hogs has never been provided. 



For conservation and economical handling of crops, sup- 
plies, and farm equipment, a granary, storage cellars and 
sheds, and equipment barns are essential. Only make- 
shift housing now exists. 

The present general storeroom, plant maintenance re- 
pair shops and plant maintenance equipment sheds are a 
fire menace to the valuable stock and equipment housed in 
them and to the adjacent Engineering buildings. They are 
also woefully inadequate. These facilities are essential 
to the operation of the whole institution. 

An increasing water shortage which in summer months 
reaches a critical condition must be met by supplementary 
pumping and storage facilities. 

A refuse incinerator will reduce the present cost of 
refuse disposal. 

SUMMARY 

The foregoing is a conservative statement of the needs 
of the College which should properly be met by State 



appropriation. The budget presented is based upon school 
and departmental budgets prepared with care, in which 
no extravagance has been allowed to remain. The sum 
requested is the amount needed to enable the institution 
to care for its students and to render the service expected 
by the agriculture and industry of Pennsylvania. 

The College has exhausted the possibilities of income 
from its own resources. Student fees are too high already 
for a State institution. Increases already made have 
worked serious hardship upon the very class of students 
the College was created to serve. As a State institution 
Penn State can not appeal successfully to private benevo- 
lence for funds for maintenance or to make up deficits. 
Its only recourse is to the Commonwealth, to which it has 
rendered conspicuous service and from which it may right- 
fully expect the means to continue and enlarge its useful- 
ness. 



Signed: 



• ■ 



H. W. Mitchell 
J. M. Thomas 
R. H. Smith 









sxhv tvaaan is 
• 3 •mutts"** 3 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLET 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



VOLUME 4 



State College, Pa., October 28, 1924 



NUMBER 6 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

BULLETIN COPIES WANTED 

The Registrar will appreciate receiv- 
ing copies of last week's Faculty Bul- 
letin containing the religious cenmis 
from members of the faculty who no 
longer need them. If you can seiid 
your copy, please do so through the 
faculty mail. 



COURSE REVISIONS 

All changes in courses and curricula 
must be in the hands of the chairman 
of the Committee on Courses of Study 
by November 1. Please note that these 
changes are to be submitted by each 
dean for his school on special blanks 
obtainable at the offices of the the 
deans. — C. W. iStoddart, chairman. 
o 

STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 
4 Davis, G. W., Agri 
4 Frezza, M. D„ PM 
4 Gates, J. S., PM 
4 Hughes, H. E., Ed 
4 Klein, J. A., Agri 
4 Pederson, IS., Agri 
2 Stoker, J. W., AE 
4 Young, E. A., Ed 



T.M.C.A. CAMPAIGN 

The T.M.C.A. has opened the faculty 
phase of its drive for a $5000 goal this 
week and each faculty member will be 
ianvassed during the next few days. 
All subscribers to the campaign are en- 
titled to receive a travelling member- 
ship card. 

| The $5000 budget is to cover the fol- 
lowing activities of the "Y" for the col- 
lege year 1924-25: 

i Handbook $150.00 

, To build Lytle Cabin 200.00 

Freshman cabinet work 300.00 

Campus service, Freshman 

reception, etc 250.00 

j Books, papers and -magazines 250.00 

I Office expenses 325.00 

; Extension Work 300.00 

i Speakers and campaigns 500.00 

'■ Mission work in the South __ 500.00 

! Educational activities 350.00 

State and International Y.M. 
C.A. 200.00 

! Maintenance and equipment 250.00 

i General social activities 250.00 

! Business secretary 1200.00 

$5025.00 

, Other items, such as the Secretary's 
nalary and certain incidentals are pro- 
vided for by gifts from friends, alumni, 
rustees, etc. 



SCHOLARSHIP DAY 

The celebration of Scholarship Day 
will take place on Monday, November 
3, at 10:30 a.m. in the Auditorium. All 
classes will be excused for the last two 
periods in the forenoon of that day. 
President John M. Thomas will preside 
at the exercises and Chancellor Bow- 
man of the University of Pittsburgh 
will be the principal speaker. 

Members of the faculty will not oc- 
cupy seats on the platform, but sections 
will be reserved for them which will be 
designated by the ushers. The usual 
procedure will be followed with regard 
to the presentation of fraternity schol- 
arship cups, Honor Society Council 
medals, the President Sparks Prize, etc., 
including announcements as to recent 
elections to the various honor societies. 
Representatives of the various honor 
societies will be on the platform. 

The Committee on Academic Stand- 
ards suggests that all faculty members 
mention Scholarship Day in their class- 
es in an effort to stimulate student in- 
terest in the exercises. This should be 
done particularly by those instructors 
who teach Freshman sections, for the 
Freshmen have no idea at the present 
time as to the meaning of the occasion. 



CALENDAR 



SCHOOL VISITS 

The second series of exchange visits 
between the faculties of the various 
schools has been arranged for Satur- 
day, November first, from 2:00 to 4:00. 
The School of Agriculture and Insti- 
tute of Animal Nutrition 1 will entertain 
the Chemistry and Physics, Mines, and 
one-half the Engineering faculties. 
These groups will meet in Dean Watts' 
office in the Agriculture Building. 

The School of Engineering will enter- 
tain the Liberal Arts, Education, and 
one-half the Agricultural faculties. They 
will meet in Engineering A. 

More detailed information may be 
secured from the dean of your school. 
o 

ATTENDS RESEARCH MEETING 

Professor A. J. Wood, a member of 
the executive committee of the div- 
ision on heat transfer of the National 
Research Council, attended an import- 
ant meeting of the committee in New 
York October 11. 



UNIVERSITY CLUB 

A Hallowe'en costume party will be 
held at the University Club on Friday 
evening, October 31. A buffet lunch will 
be served at ten o'clock. Reservations 
for the lunch should be made with the 
steward in advance. 

PHI KAPPA PHI 

Seats will be reserved for Phi Kappa 
Phi members in the Auditorium on 
Scholarship Day. AH are asked 'o be 
present. 



FRIDAY, October 31 

Hallowe'en Party at University Club. 

SATURDAY, November 1 
Soccer, Penn State vs. University of 
Toronto, New Beaver, 1:30. 

Football returns, Penn State vs. Navy, 
Auditorium, 2:30. 

SUNDAY, November 2 
Chapel Speaker — President Thomas. 

MONDAY, November 3 
Scholarship Day exercises, Audit- 
orium, 10:30. 



CARNEGIE TECH TICKETS 

Faculty members who have not yet 
secured order blanks for tickets to the 
Carnegie Tech game on November 8 
should call at the ticket window in the 
Athletic Association office, second floor 
of Old Main, at once to obtain the same. 

These blanks, properly filled out and 
containing number 12 coupon for ex- 
Change on faculty complimentary priv- 
ilege and check for any additional 
tickets desired, must be returned to the 
A.A. office by noon on Thursday, Oct- 
ober 30, at the latest. 

The tickets will be issued at the ticket 
window on Monday and Tuesday, No- 
vember 3 and 4. 

Married members of the faculty who 
secure two tickets on their coupon 
should write across the face of the 
coupon "Mr. and Mrs. ". 



NEWS SERVICE 

Changes in the method of preparing 
college news items for the press 
by the News Service Bureau of 
the Department of Public Information 
necessitates cutting down the faculty 
mailing list this year. The publica- 
tion of the "State College News" print- 
ed clip sheet has been discontinued. 
More paper is required in the mimeo- 
graphing process substituted, and con- 
sequently, only deans and heads of de- 
partments are now receiving copies of 
the service to weekly papers, and only 
deans and executive officers are receiv- 
ing the service to daily papers. Indiv- 
iduals are sent copies of news articles 
mentioning their activities as they are 
used. 

General college "news tips" phoned 
or mailed to the office in Old Main are 
always highly appreciated. 

o 

GLEE CLUB CONCERT 

The eleventh annual Pennsylvania 
Day concert by the Pern State Glee 
Club will be held on Saturday evening, 
November 8, at 7:45 in the Auditorium. 
A fine program is foe ng arranged by 
Director R. W. Grant and indications 
point to one of the best concerts in the 
history of the club. Tickets will be on 
general sale next week. 



E . W . R U N K L E . 

2 1 LIBERA L A R 'I' S 






■ 



(Published every Tuesday 
iring the college year as a 
eans of making official an- 
'Uncements and presenting 
ims of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State Colleg 



ege 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



1LUME 4 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

GRADUATE FEES CHANGED 

A.t a meeting of the executive com- 
t'tee of Jie board of trustees held on 
tober 20, it was voted that the gen- 
ii student fees in the Graduate 
hool, including fees for none-residents 
the state, be the same as for resid- 
t undergraduate students. 

■ o 

SCHEDULING OFFICERS NOTE 

The attenton of all scheduling officers 
called to the fact that no student 
ly be allowed to change sections in 
O. T. C. without first having the writ- 
i permission of the Professor of Mil- 
ry Science and Tactics. — Clenard Mc- 
.ughlin, Commandant. 

o • 

STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 

idents have left college : 

! ! Baggs, William E., CF 

[ Bush, James C, AE 

^Fiss, Harold M., 2yr. Ag. 

I Witt, Norman R., DH 

SABBATICAL LEAVE 

Che executive committee of the board 
trustees ait its last meeting voted 
it the same terms of salary refund in 
se of failure to return which apply to 
ves of absence for graduate study 
effective for 'Sabbatical Leave of 
sence. 

■ o 

LIBERAL ARTS FACULTY 

The next Liberal Arts faculty meet- 
will be a -dinner meeting at the 
intre Hills Country Club on Tuesday, 
ivember 11, at 5:30 p.m. The price 
i the dinner will be seventy cents. 
JA.ll those expecting to go should noti- 
| the dean's office on or before Satur- 
y, November 8, and should state 
lether transportation is desired. Cars 
U be arranged for all. 
Those who cannot attend the dinner 
p urged to go at 7:00 to hear the re- 
rte of the special committees and 
jjcussions. A full attendance is de- 
pd. — L. V. T. iSdmmons, secretary. 



PHI KAPPA PHI 

jrhe Phi Kappa Phi honor society will 
Id its annual dinner at the Univer- 
y Club on Monday, November 10, at 
10 p.m. President Thomas will give 
3 address of the evening. A full at- 
ldance of resident members is de- 
ed and all -who plan to be present 
auld notify Professw I. L. Foster on 
j before Saturday, November 8. 
?rofessor Foster would like to know 
once the names of all new members 
the faculty who belong to Phi Kappa 



State College, Pa., November 4, 1924 



PENNSYLVANIA DAY 

All college classes will be suspended 
on Saturday, November 8, which will be 
celebrated as Pennsylvania Day, the 
annual fall student social and athletic 
holiday. Features of the day will be 
four athletic events and the annua) 
Glee Club concert in the evening. 

Penn IS'tate will meet lOarnegie Tech 
in football at 2:30 on New Beaver Field. 
Morning athletic attractions will be 
a freshman football game with the Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh yearlings at 10:00 
on Old Beaver, and a soccer game with 
Lafayette on New Beaver at the same 
hour. A cross country meet wth Car- 
negie Tech will be run during the first 
half of the soccer game. 

o — 

GRADUATE ENROLLMENT 

Enrollment in the Graduate School 
for the first semester, 1924-25, shows a 
decided increase over that of last year, 
according to the figures just announced 
by Dean Kern. There is a total of 111 
studerits who are actually carrying grad- 
uate courses this semester, compared 
to a total -of 92 last year. This is a 
gain of 19. 

An analysis of the enrollment shows 
that 29 are strictly graduate students. 
24 are graduate assistants, and 58 are 
members of the college staff who are 
doing graduate work. Last year there 
were only 15 graduate assistants com- 
pared to 24 this fall. 

Of the graduate students, 60 are new 
registrants compared to 35 new ones a 
year ago. There are 20 women students 
doing graduate work compared to 10 
last year. 

There are eight candidates for the 
doctorate degree which is being offered 
for the first 'time this year. 

o 

GRADUATE SCHOOL COMMITTEES 

The following committees of the Grad- 
uate School faculty have been appointed 
by Dean Kern with the approval of 
President Thomas: 

Executive Committee — Dean Kern 
chairman ex-cfficio; Professors W T ood, 
Ham, McFarland, Dutcher, and Runkle. 

Courses of Study — Professor D. A. 
Anderson, chairman; Dean Holbrook, 
and Professor W- S. Dye, Jr. 

Admissions — Professors (Hill, chair- 
man; Marquardt, and Moore. 
o 

CHANGE OF COURSE 

The following tabulation of changes 
in course for the first semester 1924-25 
has just been made by the Registrar: 
School From To 

Agriculture 13 19 

Education 20 19 

Engineering 34 6 

Liberal Arts 14 44 

Mines 7 

Naltural Science 12 2 

Probation Section 21 17 

114 114 



NUMBER 7 



CALENDAR 



TUESDAY, November 4 

Election night smoker at University 
Club. Penn 'State Players, smokes, 
apples, cider, and election returns by 
radio. 

■SATURDAY, November 8 

Pennsylvania Day holiday. Athletic 
events — Penn State vs. Carnegie Tech, 
football, New Beaver, 2:30; Freshmen 
vs. Pitt, footgall, Old Beaver, 10:00; 
Penn State vs. Lafayette, soccer, New 
Beaver, 10:00; Penn State vs. Carnegie 
Tech, cross country, New Beaver, 10:30. 

Glee Club concert, Auditorium, 7:45. 
SUNDAY, November 9 

Chapel Speaker— Dr. G. G. Atkins, 
First Congregational Church, Detroit 
Michigan. 

MONDAY, November 10 

Phi Kappa Phi dinner, University 
Club, 7:00. 

ADVANCED STANDING STUDENTS 

Dr. C. E. Marquardt, the College Ex- 
aminer, has just compiled a report gov- 
erning admission of students with ad- 
vanced standing for the present sem- 
ester. This shows that a total of 134 
such students have been admitted, 90 
men and 44 women. 

These are divided among the classes 
as follows : 

Freshmen 31 

Sophomores 66 

Juniors 27 

Seniors 10 

According to schools, these advanced 
standing students are divided in this 
fashion: 

Education 54 

Liberal Arts 31 _: 

Agriculture 20 

Engineering 19 

C'hem. and Phys 8 

Mines 2 

The greatest number of advanced 
standing applicants was admitetd to 
it he curriculum in Arts and Science 
Education, 33 to be exact. Arts and 
Letters stood second with 18, and Home 
Economics, third with 13. 

o 

GLEE CLUB CONCERT 

The eleventh annual Pennsylvania 
Day concert of the Glee Club wll toe giv- 
en on Saturday evening at 7:4,5 ; in The 
Auditorium. The Glee Club and var- 
sity quartet will be assisted by Miss 
Snyder, dramatic soprano, and A. R. 
Fink, '26, violinist. The program is one 
of the best ever arranged for -the Pen- 
nsylvania Day concert. 

Tickets will be on sale at the Co-op 
on Tuesday, November 4, and Thurs- 
day, November 6, from 7:00 to 8:00 in 
■the evening. Price, 50 cents, 75 cents, 
and $1:00. 



2 1 



— ^ < .. >- 



t i B E. r. 



p. ••■ 



T ft 



. 






Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State Coll 



oiiege 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a.m. each Saturday. 



VOLUME 4 



State College, Pa., November 11, 1924 



NUMBER 8 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

ARMISTICE DAY 

By action of the Council of Adimin- 
istration, the fourth period in the 
morning on Tuesday, November 11, 
will end at 11:55 so that students and 
faculty may participate in brief Arm- 
istice Day exercises on the Front 
cmapus. Afternoon classes will be as 
usual. 

Rehabilitation students, however, 
Will be excused from classes for the 
entire day. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
tudents have left college: 
4 Backderf, Ivan O, LA 
4 Boyle, Hubert A., RM 
4 Shapiro, Philip, OF 
4 Waltman, Ivan E., EE 



LIBERAL ARTS FACULTY 

\ The next Liberal Arts faculty meet- 
ing which is to be a dinner meeting at 
1:30 on Tuesday, November 11, will be 
jield at the University Club and not at 
the Centre Hills Country Club as pre- 
viously announced. Reports of special 
lommittees will come up for discussion 
j.fter the dinner. — L. V. T. Simmons. 
Secretary. 

o 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

| There will be a meeting of the Grad- 
uate Faculty at 4:30 p.m. on Tuesday, 
[jlovember 18, in the Foyer of the Audi- 
prium. Members of the college staff 
'.aving charge of graduate courses are 
hcluded in the membership of the Grad- 
uate Faculty. A complete list of the 
jaculty is to be found in the Announ- 
cement of the Graduate School far 1924- 
5. Individual notices of the meeting 
/ill not be sent. — Frank D. Kern, dean. 



-o- 



BELOW GRADE REPORTS 

The attention of all instructors is call- 
Id to the fact that below grades for the 
light week period are due at the of- 
ices of the various deans on Wednes- 
!ay, November 19. 



WOMEN'S BELOW GRADES 

j Instructors of women students are 
©quested to send reports of their toe- 
l>w grades to the office of the Dean of 
i^omen at the end of the eight week 
jeriod. — Charlotte E. Ray, dean. 



SCHOOL VISITS 

1 i On Saturday, November 15, from 2:00 
I) 4:00 p.m., the Schools of Education 
' lid Liberal Arts will entertain the re- 
i aining members of the faculty in the 
uird of the series of school visits. 



FACULTY PUBLICITY 

- Members of the faculty are frequent- 
ly called upon to give talks of various 
kinds throughout Pennsylvania. It 
would be of great help in general col- 
lege publicity if the news bureau of the 
Department of Public Information were 
able to secure a complete copy, outline, 
or brief extract of the outstanding 
features of the proposed address at least 
one week or ten days in advance of the 
date of delivery. Many such talks could 
thereby receive state-wide publicity, or 
ai least local use in the press of the 
city where the talk is to be given. 

Agricultural faculty members should 
confer with E. H. Rohrbeck, 209 Agri- 
cultural Building, and those of all other 
schools with D. M. Cresswell, 228 Old 
Main, adjoining the office of the pres- 
ident. 

o 



CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA 

The second feature of the Y. M. C. A. 
and Department of Music entertainment 
course will be the appearance of the 
Cleveland Orchestra at State (College 
on Monday, November 17. Two con- 
certs will be given in the Auditorium, 
a special children's concert at 3:30 in 
the afternoon, and the regular course 
concert at 8:15 in the evening. 

Prices for the afternoon concert will 
be fifty cents for children and $1.00 for 
adults. Tickets for the children will be 
distributed through the schools. Tick- 
ets for the evening concert and course 
tickets for the remaining numbers will 
be on sale at the Co-op on Wednesday 
evening, November 12, from 7:00 to 
9:00. Regular course tickets will ad- 
mit to the evening concert only. 

Single tickets for the evening concert 
will be $1.50 for reserved seats and 
$1.00 fojr general admission. Adults 
who desire to attend the afternoon con- 
cert may obtain tickets at the Co-op on 
Wednesday night. 

_ o 

NEW BOOK BY DR. MARTIN 

"Pennsylvania History Told by Con- 
temporaries" is the title of a book just 
announced in press by the Macmillan 
Company, compiled by Dr. A. E. Martin, 
head of the college department of hist- 
ory and political science, and Dr. H. H. 
Shenk, professor of history at Lebanon 
Valley College. The book is described 
as being especially adapted as a sup- 
plementary text to be used in connec- 
tion with any standard history of the 
United States in order to coordinate the 
history of Pennsylvania with that of 
the country as a whole. 



REGISTRAR AWAY 

The Registrar will be on a vacation 
during the month of November. In his 
absence from the office, Dr. C. E. Mar- 
quardt, College Examiner, will be in 
charge. 



CALENDAR 

TUESDAY, November 11 

Liberal Arts faculty dinner-meeting, 
University Club, 5:30. 

FRIDAY, November 14 

University IClub card painty for mem- 
bers and guests. 

SATURDAY, November 15 

Freshman football, Penn State vs. 
California Normal, New Beaver, 1:30. 

Telegraphic returns, Penn State vs. 
P^nn, Auditorium, 2:30. 

SUNDAY, November 1(5 

Chapel Speaker— Rabbi Morris S. 
Bazaron, Madison Avenue Temple, Bal- 
timore, Md. President Thomas is ex- 
changing pulpits with Rabbi Lazaron. 
MONDAY, November 17 

The Cleveland Orchestra, Auditorium, 
3:30, children's concert; 8:15, enter- 
tainment course number. 

TUESDAY, November 18 

Graduate faculty meeting, 4:30, Foyer 
of Auditorium. 



PENN STATE PLAYERS 

Tickets for "Kempy," the Penn 
State Player production which is to be 
given in the Auditorium on Friday ev- 
ening, November 21, are now on sale 
at The State Shirt Shop where members 
of the faculty may secure them. So 
many of the faculty members desire to 
know just what seats they are getting 
that the old mail-order system has been 
discontinued. 

"Kempy" is an excellent comedy of 
American life and it is said to be one 
of the funniest plays that the Players 
have ever produced. 

o 

FACULTY INVITED 

The Association of Colleges and Prep- 
aratory Schools of the Middle Atlantic 
States and Maryland will hold its an- 
nual meeting at Washington, D.C., on 
Friday and Saturday, November 28 and 
29. Each institution holding member- 
ship in the organization has been asked 
to have an official representative at 
the convention. A general invitation is 
also extended to the entire faculty of 
each institution. 

Any Penn State faculty members who 
expect to attend are asked to advise the 
President's Office in advance. 



OFFICIAL DELEGATES 

At the 38th Annual Convention of the 
Association of Land Grant Colleges to 
be held in Washington, D. C, Novem- 
ber 12 to 14, Penn State will be officially 
represented by the following delegates: 
President Thomas; Deans Watts, Sack- 
ett. Chambers, and Stoddart ; Miss 
Chace, Miss Bogart, R. G. Bressler, 
H. G. Parkinson, M. S. McDowell, and 
E. K. Hibshman. 



Published every Tuesday 
iring the college year as a 
eans of making 1 official an- 
luncements and presenting 
:ms of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State Coll 



Q(JP^ Contributions must be as 

t2 brief as possible, and reach 

G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



5LUME 4 



State College, Pa., November 18, 1924 



NUMBER 9 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



COLLEGE SENATE 

Che regular meeting of the College 
nate "will be held on Thursday, Nov- 
ifoer 20, art 7:30 p.m. in the Foyer of 
e Auditorium. 



COURSES END 

For the benefit of those instructors 
o are teaching half-semester sub- 
>ts, it should be noted that the first 
If of the first semester will end at 
:10 on Wednesday, November 19. 
o 

AGRICULTURAL FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the Fac- 
y of the School of Agriculture on 
iursday, November 20, at 4:30 ip.m. 
iom 103 Ag. Building. 



BELOW GRADES 

Mow grades for the eight week per- 
. should be reported to the offices of 
s various deans as promptly as pos- 
le. They are due under date of 
ednesday, November 19. 



WOMEN'S BELOW GRADES 

K copy of all below grades for women 
idents should be sent to the office of 
! Dean of Women. 



GRADUATE FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the Grad- 
te School faculty at 4:30 p.m. today 
pesday) in the Foyer of the Audi- 
lium. — F. D. Kern, dean. 

STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

'During the past week the following 
Idents have left college: 
!,! Armstrong, J. G., CF 
| Baker, H. P., CF 

Canby, E. P., CE 

Oubbon, A. W., DH 

D'Amour, D. A., PL 

Worman, F. W., CF 

RMalley, C. M., PM 
3, H. H„ CF 



PROBATION SECTION 

I The following students are register- 
e. in the Dean of Men's Probation 
S. tion and below grade reports for 
tm should be sent to him: 

Burkholder, G. W. 

Breyer, Henry 

Conrad, Crawford J. 

Conrad, Francis 

Cook, Donald M. 

(Crocker, Charles 



Fuller, R. J. 
Galem, J. B. 
Hoy, Harry R. 
Hughes, Wan. T. 
Johnston, Alfred H. 
Kelly, Edward 
Parker, Geo. G. 
Pine, F. M. 
Toner, Wm. J. 
Welker, H. Roden 



CHAPEL NEWS 

The chapel speaker for Sunday, No- 
vember 23, will foe Dr. Henry H. Tweedy, 
Professor of Practical Theology at the 
Yale School of Religion. Dr. Tweedy 
is one of the outstanding leaders in the 
field of religious thought and he is sure 
to bring an inspiring message. 

In his sermon delivered in Chapel on 
Sunday, November 2, President Thomas 
sounded a keynote for the religious side 
of Penn State activity. He said in part: 

"I believe in God. On the basis of 
the experience of my life, I believe in 
God with all my heart and all my mind. 
I believe that this is God's world, that 
He made it, and is making it still, and 
is constantly making it better. I be- 
lieve that God is my friend and that 
He stands by me in the fight of life — 
Cor life is a fight — and that He will 
stand by me until I die." 



PRE-MEDS MAKING GOOD 

The following boost for Penn State 
students of the Pre-Medical curriculum 
who are now enrolled in Jefferson Med- 
ical College, Philadelphia, has just been 
received by Professor E. H. Dusham: 

"The 1925 Penn State group is doing 
very well at Jefferson. They have not 
as yet lost a man, and their grades, 
while not brilliant, have been persist- 
ently above the average of the class. 
J. I. Spangler is vice-president of the 
class; P. F. Vaccaro is class historian; 
and R. H. Robertson is editor-in-chief 
of the class yearbook." 

o 

TO ADDRESS WOMAN'S CLUB 

Dr. J. Moore Campbell, of the State 
Department of Health, will address a 
= eneral meeting of the Woman's Club 
on Tuesday, November 18, at 8:00 p.m., 
in the Presbyterian Church. Members 
of the club and their guests are invited 
to attend. 



DIRECTORY COPIES 

Faculty members who have not re- 
ceived a copy of the new Student 
and Faculty Directory may secure the 
same by calling at the Registrar's office. 
Additional copies may also be purchased 
ai a cost of twenty-five cents. 



CALENDAR 

TUESDAY, November 18 

Graduate faculty meeting, 4:30, Foy- 
er of Auditorium. 

WEDNESDAY, November 1!) 

Below grades are due. 

THURSDAY, November 20 

Agricultural faculty meeting, 4:30, 
Room 103 Ag. 

College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Audi- 
torium. 

FRIDAY, November 21 

Penn State Players in "Kempy," 8:15, 
Auditorium. 

SATURDAY, November 22 

Football, Penn State vs. Marietta Col- 
lege, 2:00, New Beaver. 

Tolstoy lecture, 8:15, Auditorium. 
SUNDAY, November 23 

Chapel Speaker — Dr. Henry H. Twee- 
dy, Yale School of Religion, New Haven. 
Conn. 



PENN STATE PLAYERS 

The initial Penn State Player pro- 
duction for the year will be "Kempy" 
which is to be given in the Auditorium 
at 8:15 on Friday evening, November 
21. No pains have been spared by 
Director iCHoetingh to make this pro- 
duction one of the best in Player hist- 
ory. "Kempy" is a comedy, and it is 
said to be one of the funniest plays 
ever produced by the Players. 

Tickets are on sale at the State 
iShirt Shop this week, and they will also 
be on sale at the box office on the night 
of the performance. 



ILYA TOLSTOY TO LECTURE 

Under the auspices of the student Cos- 
mopolitan Club, I'lya Tolstoy, son of the 
famous Russian, Leo Tolstoy, will give 
a lecture in the Auditorium on Satur- 
day evening, November 22, at 8:15. In 
addition there will be musical numbers 
by student entertainers. The admis- 
sion charge will be fifty cents and tick- 
ets are on sale at the "Y" Hut and the 
Athletic Store. 

o 

USE THE BULLETIN 

Contributions for the Faculty Bullet- 
in are always in order and will be 
appreciated by the Editor. It is not 
always possible to run them, for on 
sorne weeks there is an overflow, but 
in most cases, all contributions will be 
used. Make use of the Bulletin. 



E . W . R U N K L E . 

21 LIBERAL ARTS 









.... 



Published every Tuesday 
iring the college year as a 
eans of making official an- 
mncements and presenting 
jms of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be a-s 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



OLUME 4 



State College, Pa., November 25, 1924 



NUMBER lO 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY 

According to the college calendar, 
lanksgiving Day will be observed as 
holiday. Excuses for absence fol- 
ding the holiday will be granted on- 
in exceptional cases. Absentees 
ithout excuse will be subject to the 
iual policies of the various depart- 
ents with regard to unexcused ab- 
nces. The five dollar fine will not 
>ply.— 4- R- Warnock, dean of men. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
udents have left college: 
4 Bartow, John E., CA 

2 Detwiler, Ernest Z.., DH 

A Eraus, Rowland, 2 yr. Ag. 
A Ferree, George H., 2 yr. Ag. 

3 Lauck, Donald G., PH 
2 Schwartz, A. S., CF 

1 Sturts, Helene B., Ed. 



ENGINEERING FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the fac- 
y of the School of Engineering on 
iday, November 28, at 7:00 p. m. in 
om 200, Engineering D. — C. L. Kins- 

,i, secretary. 



IN REPORTING GRADES 

At its November meeting, the Col- 
lie Senate took the following action 
icerning the reporting of grades at 
I end of the first semester: "Grades 
I this semester shall be reported in 
;rcentages, which are to be trans- 
i.ed into honor points by the Regis- 
mr." 



FACULTY GET-TOGETHER 

President Thomas and the directors 
i the University Club invite the mem- 
'irs of the faculty to an informal get- 
'Irether at the University Club on 
''.esday evening, December 9, at 8:00 
'lie budget approved by the trustees 
;r presentation to the Legislature of 
■ 25 .will be outlined and explained by 
la President. All members of the fac- 
ly who are interested are cordially 
Mted to be present. 
(Please note the date as it has been 
'(anged from, that previously announ- 
P by the College Senate. 



| FACULTY VISIT POSTPONED 

irhe informal open house and recep- 
In which was scheduled for Satur- 
ly afternoon, November 29, by the 
■jmbined faculties of the School of 
ij.emistry and Physics and the School 
Mines, has been postponed until 
■ turday afternoon, December 6. This 
'\ on account of the many other ac- 
j'ities attendant with the Thanksgiv- 
i! week-ena. 



INTERESTING LECTURE 

Under the auspices of the State Col- 
lege section of the American Chemical 
Society, an illustrated lecture by Mr. 
George S. Ward, formerly president of 
the Ward Baking Company, will be 
given in the Amphitheatre of the 
Chemistry Annex on Tuesday, Decem- 
ber 2, at 7:30 p. m. The subject will 
be "The Public Responsibility of the 
Baker of Bread." 

Mr. Ward will discuss in popular 
manner the research work on bread 
which has been conducted under his 
direction. A great fortune was ex- 
pended in this work. The results of the 
feeding experiments, with white rats 
and with children, are of great value 
and interest, not only to chemists but 
also to parents. Members of the gen- 
eral faculty are cordially invited to 
attend, and with members of the 
Chemical Society, they are invited to 
meet Mr. Ward at the University Club 
after the lecture. 



CALENDAR 



CONCERNING FLOWERS 

The attention of members of the fac- 
ulty is called to the fact that the De- 
partment of Horticulture has ceased 
retailing flowers at the college green- 
house. This commercial phase of the 
work has become too burdensome for 
the department so it has been trans- 
ferred to the State College Floral 
Shoppe, 117 East Beaver Avenue, who 
have contracted for all flowers and 
plants produced at the greenhouse. 

This change will benefit the flower 
buyer in many ways. The store can 
offer the purchaser a greater choice 
of fresh cut flowers at all times, will 
carry a large selection of floral ac- 
cessories, and will give better service. 
The transfer will allow the division 
of floriculture of the department more 
time for instructional work. 



FORM AN ORGANIZATION 

There has been effected a prelimin- 
ary organization of societies interest- 
ed in obtaining lecturers for the col- 
lege. The American Chemical Socie- 
ty, The American Association for the 
Advancement of Science, the Econom- 
ics Society, the college administration. 
The State College Literary Club, and 
Phi Kappa Phi are represented. If any 
other societies or groups are interest- 
ed in this matter they are asked to 
communicate at once with Dean C. 
W. Stoddart. 



Those who failed to see the Penn 
State Players in "Kempy" last week 
missed one of the most humorous 
playes ever presented in the college 
auditorium. The cast was well chosen 
and the entire performance was. a high- 
class amateur production which reflect- 
ed credit on the Players and o» Direct- 
or Oo'e't'ihghi 



TUESDAY, November 25 

Soccer, Penn State vs. Swarthmore, 
New Beaver, 3:30. 

THURSDAY, November 27 
Thanksgiving Day holiday. 
Football returns. Penn State vs. 
Pitt, Auditorium, 2:00. 

lLadies Night at University Club. 
Formal dinner and dance. 

FRIDAY. November 28 
Engineering faculty meeting, 7:00, 
Room 200, Eng. D. 

SUNDAY, November 30 
Chapel Speaker — Dr. Fraser Metz- 
ger, College Chaplain. 

TUESDAY, December 2 
Open meeting, American Chemical 
Society, 7:30, Amphitheatre. 

PHI BETA KAPPA 

The third annual dinner of the .State 
College Association 'of Phi Beta Kappa 
will toe held on Thursday evening, De- 
cember 11, at 7:00, in the dinning room 
of .the University Club. All members 
of Phi Beta Kappa, of whatever chap- 
ter, who live in State College are elig- 
ible to membership in the local asso- 
ciation, and every member is urged to 
attend the dinner. 



ALL-COLLEGE DINNER 

Members of the faculty who are 
planning to attend the annual conven- 
tion of the Pennsylvania State Edu- 
cation Association at Erie, December 
29 to 31. will be interested in an all- 
college dinner which will be held on 
Tuesday, December 30. at 6:00 p. m. 
in the First Methodist Episcopal 
Church, at Erie. 

This will be a reunion dinner for 
the alumni of Pennsylvania colleges 
and universities, and each group will 
have its own table. It is hoped, that 
Penn State will be well represented. 

Further information concerning the 
convention and advance reservations 
may be obtained from W. P. Loomis, 
114 Main Building. Requests for res- 
ervations may also be made by letter 
or telephone. 



BULLETIN ITEMS 

Attention of faculty members is once 
more called to the note appearing on 
the upper right hand corner of the 
"Faculty Bulletin." Important items 
■have missed publication through not 
being sent direct to G. W. Sullivan, 
Bulletin Editor, or through not reach- 
ing him in time. 

_ o 

The Literary Digest, in its issue of 
November 15, contains a picture of Dr. 
Gerald L. Wendt, dean of the School 
of Chemistry and Physics, in connec- 
tion with a resume of his discussion 
of the disintegration ot the atom. 






E . W . R u N KLE, 

2 1 LIBERAL A R t s 



i ■ 






Published every Tuesday 
uring the college year as a 
leans of making official an- 
suncements and presenting 
ems of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



OLUME 4 



State College, Pa., December 2, 1924 



NUMBER 11 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



FACULTY GET-TOGETHER 

Members of the faculty are invited 
i an informal get-together at the 
niversity Club on Tuesday evening, 
ecember 9, at 8:00, when President 
homas will outline and explain the 
ldget approved by the trustees for 
•esentation to the Legislature of 1925. 
A copy of a four page folder on 
The College Legislative Budget" was 
nt to each faculty member last week, 
additional copies are required they 
ay be obtained at the President's 
ffice. Every faculty member should 
ad and study this folder carefully 
rfore the get-together meeting is 
2ld. 



SENATE ACTION 

At its November meeting, the Col- 
ge Senate abrogated the action of 
>.& general faculty of November, 1911, 
hich' provided that no more than two 
?ars credit toward the bachelor's de- 
•ee could be obtained through sum- 
er session work. The reason for the 
•tion lies in the fact that the present 
jmmer session work is now on a par 
ith work offered during the regular 
liege year, which was not the case, 
■wever, when the ruling was made 
1911. 



GRADUATE REQUIREMENTS 

At the November meeting of the 
allege Senate, the following action 
as taken amending Paragraph 62 in 
(Regulations Affecting Students" to 
iad as follows: 

"A candidate for the bachelor's de- 
L'ee in any course in the college shall 
ursue in residence not less than thir- 
i credits of the required work which 
ball be approved by the head of the 
epartment concerned. The time spent 
l residence shall be not less than two 
i?mesters, or five summer sessions ag- 
|regating a minimum of thirty weeks. 
iimediately preceding graduation." 

This change was made necessary by 
tie fact that the present summer ses- 
ion is of but six weeks duration in- 
tead of eight weeks as it was when 
he, paragraph was originally drawn 
P 



FACULTY VISIT 

The postponed Informal open house 
a the School of Mines and the School 
if Chemistry and Physics for mem- 
iers of all other faculties will be held 
'.ext Saturday afternoon, December 6. 
?hose making the trip are invited to 
neet at the rear of the Old Mining 
building at the door across from the 
adio station at 2 o'clock. Guides will 
ske the party through both schools, 
inlshing with a visit to the mining 
museum building. 



ENTER PENN STATE 

According to a report compiled by 
Dr. C. E. Marquardt, College Examiner, 
one or more students from the following 
educational institutions were admitted 
to Penn State with more or less advanc- 
ed standing for the present semester. 

University of Pittsburgh, 9; Carnegie 
Institute of Technology, Edinboro State 
Normal •'School, 6 each; Blooms'burg 
IState Normal iSohool, Franklin and 
Marshall College, Juniata College, Key- 
stone State Normal School, Mansfield 
State Normal School, and the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, 5 each; Albright 
College, Bucknell University, Columbia 
University, Genevia College, Lebanon 
Valley College, Millersville State Norm- 
al 'School, and Philadelphia College of 
Pharmacy, 3 each; Dickinson College, 
Drexel) Institute, East Stroudsburg 
State Normal School, George Washing- 
ton University, Indiana State Normal 
School, Lehigh University, University of 
Michigan, Penn State Summer Session, 
'Susquehanna University, Temple Uni- 
versity, Washington and Jefferson Col- 
lege, and the West Chester State Norm- 
al School, 2 each; Amherst College, 
Bethany College, Central State. Normal 
School, University of 'Cincinnati, Col- 
gate University, University of Dela- 
ware, College of the City of Detroit, 
University of Detroit, Duquesne Uni- 
versity, Gettysburg 'College, Grove City 
College, Hiram College, Hood College, 
University of Kansas, Lake Erie Col- 
lege, Labelsche Handelschu'le, (Ger- 
many), Miami University, Milwaukee 
School of Engineering, University of 
Montana, Mt. Aito State Forestry 
School, Muhlenberg College, North 
Georgia Agricultural College, Pennsyl- 
vania Museum and School of Indust- 
rial Arts, Philadelphia Normal School, 
University of Porto Rico, Slippery Rock 
State Normal School, Mississippi State 
Teachers College, St. Lawrence Uni- 
versity, St. Thomas College, Texas 
Christian University, LTirsinus (College 
'United States Military Academy, United 
States Naval Academy, Waynesburg 
College, Wells College, Westminster 
College, and Wilson College, 1 each. 
o 

In compliance with a request of the 
executive committee of the Board of 
Trustees', 'the following members of 
the faculty have 'been appointed as a 
committee to compile a memorial 
pamphlet on the late Dr. E. E. Sparks: 
Professors Pattee, Runkle, and Wood- 
ruff. The proposal is to combine all 
memorial resolutions on Dr. Sparks, 
together with a biographical sketch 
and such other information as the 
committee may determine. 



CALENDAR 



President Thomas has appointed the 
following Senate committee to draw 
up the college calendar for next year: 

Dean Sackett, chairman; Professors 
Fletcher, Hasek, Duncan, Parkinson, 
and Chedsey. 



TUESDAY, Dee-ember 2 
Lecture by Mr. George S. Ward on 
"The Public Responsibility of the 
Baker of Bread," under auspices of 
American Chemical Society, 7:30, Am- 
phitheatre. 

SATURDAY, December 6 
Informal open house at School of 
Mines and School of Chemistry and 
Physics, for all other school faculties. 
Meet at rear of Old Mining Building, 
a ; 2 o'clock. 

SUNDAY, December 7 
Chapel Speaker — Dr. Andrew Mutch, 
Bryn Mawr Presbyterian Church, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

TUESDAY, December » 
Faculty Ge<t-together, University 
Club, 8:00. 

REGARDING PUBLICITY 

When faculty members receive re- 
quests for photographs or news items 
regarding college activities, they are 
reminded that all college publicity- 
should pass through the Department 
of Public Information. This does not 
include personal contributions based 
on research work at the college and 
sent to technical, educational, or scien- 
tific publications. However, copies of 
such articles are sought by the News 
Bureau of the department for possible 
use as newspaper publicity. 

If necessary, no use will be made 
of such articles until they have first 
appeared in the journal accepting the 
contribution. Any such articles pub- 
lished in recent months should be 
brought to the attention of the De- 
partment of Public Information at 
once. 



DEAN HOLBROOK HONORED 

At a meeting of the mining section 
of the American Engineering Stand- 
ards Committee held recently in Pitts- 
burgh, Dean Holbrook was re-elected 
chairman. This section is composed 
of representatives of all national so- 
cieties and organizations having an 
interest in mining standardization. The 
chairman also serves as a member of 
the American Engineering Standards 
Committee. 



CONTRIBUTES A REVIEW 

Dr. A. L. Carter, of the English de- 
partment, contributed to a recent issue 
of the Journal of English and German 
Philology, a review of H. C. Wyld's 
"Studies in English Rhymes from Sur- 
rey to Pope.'' 



2 1 LiBL F. A L A R T S 



. 






<: 



■ ■ 






■ ■■■., 

-- . 



-*■»*». 
















i 






! 






f 






- 



Published every Tuesday 
uring the college year as a 
leans of making official an- 
ouncements and presenting 
;ems of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be a-> 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



OLUME 4 



State College, Pa., December 9, 1924 



NUMBER 12 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

FACULTY GET-TOGETHER 

A faculty get-together will be held 
; the University Club tonight, Tues- 
jy, at 8:00, when President Thomas 
ill discuss the college legislative bud- 
3t as it will be presented to the next 
ssgion of the State Legislature. All 
iculty memibers are invited to be 
resent. 



LIBERAL ARTS FACULTY 

The next Liberal Arts faculty meet- 
g will be held at 4:30 p. m. on Wed- 
3sday, December 10, in Room 2'5 of the 
iberal Arts Building. Reports of 
immittees will be considered — (L. V. 
. Simmons, secretary. 



INFORMATION WANTED 

The office of the Dean of Men would 
| glad to receive information from 
i^ans and advisers as to conditions 
bout the college which, in their opin- 
X are handicapping students in study- 
g. — A. R. Warnook, dean. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
udents have left college: 



Baker, Lillian F., HE 
Baker, Samuel E., CF 
Evans, John B., PM 
Hammond, Henry S., Ich 
Mills, Charles A., ME 
McGinness, George L., EE 
Walker, Albert W„ Mug. 



FINAL EXAMINATIONS 



jAll recitations and practicians for 
e first semester will end on Satur- 
jy, January 31, 1925, at noon. 
Final examinations for the first sem- 
per will be given from February 2 
I February 6, inclusive, according to 
! list published in the Collegian of 
tiday, December 5. Copies of this 
• t will be mailed to all department 
lads this week. Examinations are to 
of two hours' duration, beginning 
8:00 and 10:20 a. m.. and at 2:00 
m. 
JAttention is called to the fact that 
tices of adjustments of final exam- 
.ition conflicts will be mailed to heads 
I departments on January 13, 1925. 
(Instructors having examinations to 
t scheduled by appointment can get 
bm assignments after January 13. 

FRENCH CLUB PROGRAM 

!Le Salon do Marianne (The French 
f]Jb) will hold a meeting on Wednes- 
rly, December 10, at 7:30 p. m. in the 
yer of the Auditorium. In addition 
I a talk on the music and musicians 
I' France by Mr. Albert Robin, of the 
- manoe Language department, a mu- 
i al program will be rendered. All 
'I mibers of the faculty and their 
jlbnds are invited to attend. 



THESPIANS IN "WOODEN SHOES" 

The Thespians will present their new 
production, "Wooden Shoes," in the 
Auditorium on Saturday evening, De- 
cember 13, at 8:15. The play was writ- 
ten by R. B. Voskamp and J. D. Mc- 
Lean, members of the Senior clasps, and 
is being staged by Ned Wayburn who 
so successfully staged last year's per- 
formance of "The Magazine Cover 
Girl." There will be plenty of clever 
dancing and catchy music, according 
to advance reports, and ''Wooden 
Shoes" is said to be even better than 
last year's production. 

There will be an advance ticket sale 
for faculty memberes on Wednesday 
afternoon, December 10, at Co-op. The 
general ticket sale will be at 7:30 Wed- 
nesday evening, and tickets will also 
be on sale at the box office on the night 
of the play. 



CALENDAR 



SCIENTISTS TO MEET 

Members of the faculty are invited 
to attend the annual meeting of the 
American Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Science which will be 
held in Washington, D. C, from De- 
cember 29, 1924 to January 3, 1925. 
A large delegation of members of the 
local branch of the Association will no 
dcubt attend the meeting. 



CHANGES IN ADDRESS 

Faculty members who 'have changed 
their local address since the Student 
and Faculty Directory went to press 
should advise the President's office at 
once. Manuscript is now being prepar- 
ed for the General Catalogue and ad- 
dress changes or other corrections 
should be reported immediately. 



EDUCATION AS'S'N TO MEET 

The local branch of the Pennsylvania 
State Educational Association will 
meet in Room 121 Old Main on Wed- 
nesday, December 10, at 4:30 p. m. 
A full attendance' is desired and non- 
members are invited. — O. Everett My- 
ers, president. 



CATALOGUE MATERIAL 

Manuscript 'tor the 1924-25 General 
■Catalogue has been sent to the various 
deans for preparation. Heads of de- 
partments should make sure thai ali 
errors in last year's catalogue are cor- 
rected and that ail authorized additions 
ov changes are indicated on the copy. 



ATTEND SCIENCE MEETING 

Penn State was represented at the 
first annual meeting of the Pennsyl- 
vania Academy of Science- held re- 
cently in Harrisburgh, by Dr. F. D 
Kern, Professor C. R. Orton. and W. 
A. Kuniz, all of the Botany depart- 
ment. Dr. Kern and Mr. Kuntz pre- 
sented papers. 



TUESDAY, December i) 

Faculty get-together, University 
Club, 8:00. 

WEDNESDAY, December 10 
Liberal Arts faculty meeting. Room 
25, L. A., 4:30. 

FRIDAY, December 12 
Ruth Rogers, entertainment course 
number, Auditorium, 8:15. 

SATURDAY, December 13 
"Wooden Shoes," Thespian produc- 
tion, Auditorium. 8:15. 

SUNDAY, December 14 
Chapel Speaker — Bishop F. .1. Me- 
Connell. D. D., Methodist Episcopal 
Church, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MONDAY, December 15 
Penn State Players will present a 
three-act play at the University Club, 
for members and guests. 

THURSDAY, December 1* 
College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Audi- 
torium. 



CHAPEL NOTICE 

The Reverend Francis J. McConnell. 
D. D., Bishop of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church with residence in Pitts- 
burgh, will be the chapel speaker on 
Sunday, December 14. Bishop McCon- 
nell has served as pastor of some of 
the most important Methodist churches 
of the country and is the author of 
several well-known religious books. 

Previous to his election to the bish- 
opric, he was president of De Pauw 
University. He is constantly in de- 
mand as a college preacher and will 
b" remembered as one of the most 
popular speakers at Penn State eha.pel 
.services. Members of the faculty an' 
cordially invited to hear Bishop Mc- 
Connell at the chapel services on Sun- 
day. 



ENTERTAINMENT COURSE 

The third number of the Y. M. C. 
A. and Department of Music entertain- 
ment course will be given in the Au- 
ditorium on Friday evening, December 
12, at 8:15. Miss Ruth Rogers, a so- 
prano trained entirely in America, will 
give a well-balanced program of op- 
eratic selections and lighter songs. 
Tickets are on sale at the 'Y" Hut and 
they will also be on sale at the dem- 
on the night of the concert. 



ADDRESSES CONFERENCE 
President Thomas was a principal 
speaker at the sixteenth annual inter- 
fraternity conference held at the Hotel 
Pennsylvania in New York City re- 
cently. More than 200 delegates rep- 
resenting' 57 fraternities from 100 col- 
leges, and a score or more .prominent 
educators were present at the confer- 
S nee. Penn State wan also represent- 
ed by Dr. W. S. Dye, Jr.. and C. W 
Tavlor, '25. 



E . 1? . R U N K L E , 



21 LIBERAL ARTS 



■ * ' 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
tems of interest to the faculty. 



The P 



!■'•'' tinsyfvania State 




Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



/OLUME 4 



State College, Pa., December 16, 1924 



NUMBER 13 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

COLLEGE SENATE 
The December meeting of the Col- 
ge Senate will be held on Thursday 
veiling, December 18, at 7:30 in the 
'oyer of the Auditorium. 



AGRICULTUBAL FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the fac- 
Ity of the Srh-o : o Vrrieul'-ure or 
hursday, December 18, ai 4:30, m 
.oom 103 of the Agricultural Building. 

R. L. Watts, dean. 



2nd SEMESTER SCHEDULE 

Department heads may see the sched- 
le for the next semester by al'ing ai 
lie office of the College Scheduling 
;fficer at the following hours as in- 
icated: 

[December 17, 1:00 to 5:00 p. m., Ag- 
culture and Chemistry and Physics 
! December 18, 1:00 to 5:00 p. m., En- 
gineering and Mires. 
'December 19, 8:00 to 12:00 a. m., Lib- 
ra! Arts and Education. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

! During the past week the following 
ludents have left college: 

3 Brucher, Joe, CE 

4 Coyne, Elizabeth A., LA 
4 Culler, Ned Q., NS 

3 Evans, Paul J., AE 
3 Green, A. R., Ich 

3 Kerr, Andrew, CE 

4 Meng, Elmer R., CE 

4 Rencken, John M., CF 
3 Smith, Walter E., Ech 
3 Todd, John, ME 



REGARDING ABSENCES 

'The five dollar fine will be in effect 
Is to unexcused absences immediately 
fefore or after the Christmas vacation 
:hich begins on Friday, December 19 
: 5:20 p. m., and ends on Tuesday 
anuary 6, at 8:00 a. m. Practically no 
■reuses will be issued for absence at 
!iis time, except, of course, for serious 
!!ness. Instructors in practicum, lab- 
hatory, and similar classes can help 
l-aintain an attitude of respect for this 
'pie by announcing that these classes, 
B well as all other classes, will be con- 
acted as usual. 

I Whenever any students, even a very 
i-W, are excused early, the fact soon 
';comes known and all other students 
ash to the deans and instructors 'to 
|*gue for similar concessions. 
! Students who are absent without 
', ave on the last day before or the 
pst day after the vacation should be 
^irred from further class attendance 
atil a permit to re-enter classes is 
lown ito the instructor. — A. R. War- 
3ck, Dean of Men. 



MERRY CHRISTMAS 

This is the final issue of the Faculty 
Bulletin until after the Christmas hol- 
idays and it carries to every member 
of the faculty all good wishes for a 
most Merry Christmas and a Happy 
New Year. May 1925 be a banner year 
for Penn State and for each member 
of the official "family." 

The next issue of the Bulletin will be 
under date of Tuesday, January 6. 



THE "PENN CHARTER FUND" 

Most members of the faculty are no 
doubt familiar with the effort now be- 
ing- made by loyal Pennsylvanians to 
obtain by voluntary contributions the 
sum of $25,000 with which to purchase 
for the State the original copy of Wil- 
viam Penn's Charter of Liberties, now 
i"' the possession of Mr. Gabriel Wells 
a New York collector, who is willing 
to sell it at the purchase price recently 
-•'id to the George C. Thomas estate. 

A movement is now on foot among 
the faculty and students to make some 
contribution to this worthy purpose. 
Some account of this undertaking will 
be found in the Penn State Collegian 
for Friday of last week. Nearly one- 
half the total fund has already been 
raised, most of it in one dollar contri- 
butions. 

The combined fund from the faculty 
students, and townspeople of State Col- 
lege will be sent in on Thursday morn- 
ing, December 18. Those who wish to 
contribute to this fund may send their 
contribution to Mr. Espenshade, acting 
as treasurer of the local fund, at 228 
Main Building. If checks are used in 
making contributions, they should be 
drawn to the order of A. H. Espen- 
shade, Treasurer, who will Obtain a 
draft for the total amount in ordei 
that it may be forwarded Thursday by 
President Thomas. 



col. Mclaughlin honored 

After twenty-three years, a citation 
for bravery in action against insur- 
gents in th& Philippines has come to 
Lieutenant-Colonel MdLaughlin. Com- 
mandant at Penn State. The citation 
has just come from Washington and 
enables him to wear a silver star on 
his Philippine service ribbon. 



SPANISH CLUB 
The lOiroulo de los Amigos de la 
Lengua Espanola ('Spanish Club) will 
■give a musical program in the Old 
Chapel on Wednesday evening, Decem- 
ber 17, at 7:30. Those who are inter- 
ested in the artistic life of the Span- 
ish speaking countries are cordially in- 
vited to attend. 



NO CHAPEL 

Due to the Christmas holidays, nc 
chapel services will be held on the next 
three Sundays, December 2.1, December 
28, and January 4. 



CALENDAR 



WEDNESDAY, December 17 

Basketball, Penn State vs. Juniata 
7:00, Gymnasium. 

THURSDAY, December 18 

Agricultural faculty meeting, 4:30 
Room 103 Ag. 

College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Audi- 
torium. 

Christmas party and Ladies' Night at 
University Club. 

FRIDAY, December 19 
Christmas vacation begins, 5:20 p. m. 
WEDNESDAY, December 31 

New Year's Eve watch party at Uni- 
versity Club. 

TUESDAY, January 6 

Christmas vacation ends, 8:00 a. m. 



PENNSYLVANIA PLACE NAMES 

Professor A. H. Espenshade has 
completed the manuscript of a book to 
be entitled "Pennsylvania Place 
Names," which is an historical com- 
mentary on the founding and the nam- 
ing of all the Pennsylvania counties, 
county-seats, and towns with a popu- 
lation of five thousand or more, and on 
the most noteworthy village and town- 
ship names. 

A circular letter of information about 
the publication of this book has been 
sent to about one hundred members 
of the faculty. Any one who has not 
received this circular and who is in- 
terested in this publication can ch- 
ain information by telephoning or 
seeing Mr. Espenshade at 228 Main 
Budding. 

For his mailing list Mr. Espenshade 
would be glad to receive through the 
manil'la mail the names and addresses 
of persons who are known to be inter- 
ested in Pennsylvania history. 



UNIVERSITY CLUB 

The following is the Christmas holi- 
day program, of the University Club: 

Thursday, December 18, Ladies' night 
and Christmas party, to which the jun- 
ior members of the family are invited. 

ISaturday, December 20. Children's 
Christmas party, from 4:00 to 7:00. 

Wednesday, December 31, New Year's 
Eve watch party for members and 
guests. 



A THESPIAN SUCCESS 

The initial performance of the Thes- 
pians in "Wooden Shoes,'' their new 
production, which was given in the 
Auditorium on iSaturday night, was an 
instant success. In many respects, it 
was even better than last year's "Mag- 
azine Cover Girl." The Thespians will 
go on a road tour during the holidays, 
appearing in Philadelphia and other 
eastern cities. 




E.W.RUNKLE. 

21 LIBERAL ARTS 



A 



Published every Tuesday 
uring the college year as a 
leans of making official an- 
ouncements and presenting 
ems of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



OLUME 4 



State College, Pa., January 6, 1925 



NUMBER 14 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

STUDEN TS WITHDRAW 

)' ia the past month the follow- 
is have left college: 
,-ith, Ward S., IB 
rdman, Arthur, AL 
Ke r, M. M., 2 yr. Ag. 

3 Koerper, Harry F., For. 

2 McDougall, C. D., ChA 
I Sanford, R. J., Engl. 

4 Sehinnerer, Victor, CE 
4 Schwartz, C. B., PL 

3 Stover, Arthur Z., CE 

3 Straight, George A„ PL 

o 

STUDENTS DROPPED 

The following students have been 
ropped because of poor scholarship: 
3 Todd, John, ME 
3 Calderon, Frank L., ME 

The following students have been 

ropped permanently because of poor 

holarship: 

3 Baker, William W., AE 

3 Dorman, 'Lester H., FF 



NAME CHANGED 

[By action of the Board of Trustees 
en just before the holidays', the 
lime of 'the School of Mines has been 
ianged to the "School of Mines and 
[etallurgy." The change was made 
more clearly present the character 
I the training offered by the school. 

o 

SANGES IN EXAM SCHEDULE 

he attention of all members of the 
hin§' staff is called to the liacl that 

>y are not at liberty to change the 
Jne or the place of any regularly 
jieduled examination without the 

ow'cdge and consent of the College 
'heduling Officer. 



""ULEGE CALENDAR 

I C '.lege Senate at its December 

- an; roved the report of the 

•^-nmiittee of which Dean 

^ s chairman and the following 

nts are of general interest to the 

Jmlty : 

Dpen'ng date next fall will be Se.p- 
Mnber 16, one week earlier than this 
Br. The first semester will end Feb- 
i lry G, which is the same as this 
lax, and the second semester will end 
■he 11, also the same relative date 
Kl for 1924-25. 
Due to the scheduling of Notre Dame 

I the Alumni Home-coming football 
rfne, Alumni Home-coming Day will 
Vjcelebrated on November 7, which will 
tja holiday. There will be no student 
1'iiday on Pennsylvania Dav, October 
2; 

i The annual Thanksgiving vacation 

II been restored extending from noon 
c Wednesday, Nov. 25 to noon on 



Monday, Nov. 30. Christmas vacation 
i3 approximately the same as this year, 
from Friday, December 18, at 5:20, to 
Tuesday, January 5, at 8:00. The 
B-'iaster vacation will be a full week, 
fi urn Wednesday, March 31, at 5:20, to 
Thursday, April 8, at 8:00. 



TO STUDY ATTENDANCE 

At the December meeting of the Col- 
lege Senate, it was voted to approve 
the appointment of a committee of the 
Senate to study problems relating to 
the regulation of class attendance 
throughout the college and to recom- 
mend, if possible, to the Senate im- 
provements in the present system. The 
Senate voted that the committee should 
li, composed of representatives of both 
the administrative and teaching staff- 
on account of the traditional practice 
of the college which left this matter 
in the hands of the individual instruc- 
tors in charge of a class. The commit- 
tee follows : 

Dean Warnock, Professors Hoffman. 
Walker. D. D. Mason, Bress'ler, Shaw, 
and Daily. 

PENN STATE CONTRIBUTES 

As a result of the campaign among 
faculty and students of the college on 
behalf of the William Penn Charter 
Fund, President Thomas was able to 
forward to the Public Ledger, spon- 
sors of the movement, a cheek for 
$232.51 as Penn State's share in this 
patriotic, state-wide effort to save the 
charter for Pennsylvania. Of this 
amount, $127.00 was contributed by 
177 members of the faculty. 

In the letter that accompanied Penn 
State's gift, President Thomas said: 
"In behalf of the contributors I wish 
■to express hearty commendation of 
your endeavor to preserve this great 
historical document as a possession of 
the Commonwealth whose liberties it 
guaranteed. Pennsylvania can not 
have too many reminders of its debt 
t3 William Penn nor of the noble and 
generous principles on which he es- 
tablished his holy experiment." 

No doubt all members of the faculty 
are aware of the success of the Ledg- 
er campaign, the necessary $25,000 
having been secured by Christmas so 
that the charter became a Christmas 
gift to the state from its citizens. 
o 

GIVES INTERESTING LECTURE 

At a meeting of the Motive Power 
Club just previous to the holidays, 
Professor O. K. Harlan of the Mechan- 
ical Engineering department, gave an 
illustrated lecture dealing with unus- 
ual engineering feats witnessed by him 
last summer on a trip to the annual 
meeting of the Society for the Pro- 
motion of Engineering Education held 
in Boulder, Colorado. Following the 
lectures a Christmas party was held 
■foi members of the club. 



CALENDAR 

SATURDAY, January 10 

i aske '• -• ' Penn State freshmen vs. 
Carnegie T?ch freshmen, 6:30: Penn 
State vs. Carnegie Tech, 7:30, Armory. 
SUNDAY, January 11 

Chapel Speaker — Dr. Fraser Metz- 
er college chaplain. 

ANNUAL REPORT ISSUED 

Advance copies of the Annual Re- 
port of the President have just been 
n ceived from the printer and are go- 
ing forward this week to members of 
the Board of Trustees and to the State 
Legislature. Notice will be given as 
to when and how members of the fac- 
ulty can secure copies. 

This year's report, which by its title 
explains "The Service of the Pennsyl- 
vania State College to The Common- 
wealth," is even more complete than 
that of lafi't year. It is a 128-page book 
containing reports of other college 
officers in addition to that of the Pres- 
ident. 

The' report contains a frontispiece 
showing the new Varsity Hall and the 
Watts Hall and Varsity Hall group. 
A memorial page to the late Dr. Edwin 
E. Sparks, former president, is included. 
Reports of the different schools and 
departments are given in three fields 
of activity: Resident instruction, re- 
search, and extension. 

The Legislative Budsret in request of 
appropriation for 1925-27 is a new feat- 
ure of the' report, proposing an ap- 
propriation tor maintenance and build- 
ings of $6,323,220. The report of the 
Comptroller is in the most eonn^et > 
form that it has ever been made and 
includes a number of statistical tables 
of unusual interest. 

Other renorrs included are those of 
the Carnegie Library, Dean of Men. 
Dean of Women. Health Service, Col- 
lege Chaplain, and Department of Pub- 
lic Information. It is one of the most 
informative reports in the history of 
Penn State and members of the faculty 
are urged to make themselves familiar 
with it. Copies will be mailed to all 
alumni and to a "constituents' list" of 
more than 20,000 names. 

o 

ATTENDS POULTRY MEETING 

Professor H. C. Knandel, of the 
Poultry Husbandry department, re- 
presented the American Association of 
Instructors and Investigators in Poul- 
try Husbandry at the organization of 
the National Poultry Council in Chi- 
cago shortly before the holidays. 
o 

MADE ASSISTANT TREASURER 

At the December meeting of the ex- 
ecutive committee of the Board of 
Trustees, H. R. Kinley was given the 
title of Assistant Treasurer, a newly 
created position. 



%m e «» e x\ \J i « ( \ U L. 



1 L I BEEAL ARTS 






, 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



VOLUME 4 



State College, Pa., January 13, 1925 



NUMBER 15 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

COLLEGE SENATE 

The regular meeting of the College 
Senate will be held on Thursday eve- 
ning, January 15, at 7:30, in the Foy- 
jr of the Auditorium. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

There will be a meeting of the fac- 
llty of the School of Education this 
ifternoon (Tuesday), at 3:30, In Room 
L21, Old Main.— H. G. Parkinson, sec- 
etary, 



GRADUATE FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the facul- 
:y of the Graduate School this after- 
loon (Tuesday), at 4:30, in the Foyei/ 
)f the Auditorium. — F. D. Kern, dean. 



LIBERAL ARTS FACULTY 

The next Liberal Arts faculty meet- 
ng will be held on Wednesday, Jan- /> 
lary 14, at 4:30, in Room 25 of the Lib- 
ral Arts Building. — L. V. T. Sinomons, 
ecretary. 



AGRICULTURAL FACULTY 

There will ibe a meeting of the faculty 
if the School of Agriculture on Thurs- 
ay, January 15, at 4:30, in Room 103 
>f the Agricultural Building. — R. L. 
Vatts, dean. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW, 

During the past week the following 

tudents have left college: 
4 Lutoreeht, Fred H., Mng. 
4 Rutherford, Robert B., Jr., CF 
4 Schade, Albert M., AE 



REGISTRATION DAYS 

, Registration days for the second 
lemester as scheduled in the calendar 
ire January 28 to 31, inclusive, Wed- 
nesday, Thursday, Friday, and Satur- 
lay until noon. Registration posters 
Civing detailed information will toe plac- 
d on all (bulletin hoards and in the 
leans' offices. The work of the second 
lemester will begin at 8:00 a. m. on 
Jonday, February 9. 



MID-YEAR GRADUATES 

i| The attention of all instructors is 
I ailed to the following list of Seniors 
|lvho expect to finish their course and 
fjret their degree at the approaching 
jrlid-Year Convocation. 
i The grades of these Seniors should 
l|>e reported on a separate sheet mark- 
jd "Mid- Year Graduates" in order that 
Ijhey may ibe recorded at once, without 
leing sorted out from a multitude of 
trade sheets belonging to other stu- 
ents. 
h No grades of mid-year graduates 



ChA 



should reach the Registrar's office lat- 
er than 9:00 a. iri. on Saturday, Feb- 
ruary 7. The list follows: 

Bachrach, A., AH 
Baldwin, J. A., OF 
Bartleson, R. I., AL 
Brewer, J. iH., AH 
Burdan, J. W., DH 
Byerly, E., Ed 
Campbell, A. L., PM 
Coldren, J., AH 
Coon, M. M., HE 
'Cunningham, N. T., 
Lyvis, H. S.. Mng. 
Dayton, R. B., ChA 
Duncan, B. C, OF 
Ealy, F. R., DH 
Ehinger, W. J., PH 
Epler, D. B., Agro 
Evans, P. R., DH 
Fee, E. M., AL 
Fisher, E. J., Hort 
Fyock, J. S., Hort 
Gouget, C. W., Hort 
Jones, H. R., EE 
Keller, A. C, iCh 
.Jvern, E. M., AL 
Kleckner, W. R., BE 

Knox, E. G., HE 
Kuhl, H. J., Ech 

Lafferty, H. D., NS 

McGovern, M. C, LAreh 

Mahoney, A. R., OH 

O'Donneil, D. X., PM 

Reed, V. M., AL 

Russell, J. R., CF 

Schantz, A. G., CF 

Schuster, R. L., PL 

Shuman, H. O., DH _ 

Shreve, B. A., *#« C- *^ 

Snyder, W- F - PL| 

Soentgen, H. L., Hort 

Weitzenkom, E., Ch 

White, T. W. L., OF 

Witt, H. S., Hort 

Wolford, S. R., AL 

Wright, J. F., CF 

Zook, R. M., EE 



DR. PATTEE TO SPEAK 

Professor F. L. Pattee will be the 
speaker at a meeting of the Forestry 
Club to toe held in Old Chapel tonight 
(Tuesday) at 7:00. His subject will be 
"Forestry from the Literary Stand- 
point." Members of the faculty who are 
interested are cordially invited to at- 
tend. 






fpsf' rj m 




TO PRESENT ONE-ACT PLAYS 

The Playshop (English 303) will 
present four one-act plays in the Au- 
ditorium on Friday evening, January 
16, at 8:15. The plays will be: "A Night 
at an Inn," by Lord Dunsany; "Four- 
teen," by Alice Gustentoerg; "Sweet 
and Twenty," by Floyd Dell; and "Two 
Pairs of Spectacles," toy W. B. Morgan. 
Admission is free and tickets may be 
secured at The State Shirt Shop. Mem- 
bers of the faculty are especially in- 
vited. A collection will be taken to de- 
fray expenses. 



CALENDAR 

TUESDAY, January 13 

•School of Education faculty meeting, 
3:30, 121 Old Alain. 

Graduate School faculty meeting, 
4:30, Foyer of Auditorium. 

WEDNESDAY, Jamiiiry 11 
Liberal Arts faculty meeting, 4:30, 
25 LA. 

THURSDAY, January 15 
Agricultural faculty meeting, 4:30, 
103 Ag. 

College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Audi- 
torium. 

FRIDAY, January 16 
One-act plays by The Playshop, 8 : 15, 
Auditorium. 

SATURDAY, January 17 
Basketball — Penn State freshmen vs. 
Dickinson Reserves, 7:00; Penn State 
vs. Susquehanna, 8:00. 

SUNDAY, January 18 
(Chapel Speaker — Dr. Henry W. A. 
Hanson, President of Gettysburg- Col- 
lege, Gettysburg, Pa. 

COPIES OF ANNUAL REPORT 

Copies of the Annual Report of the 
President for 1923-24 are being sent to 
members of the faculty this week 
through the manilla mail. Those not 
receiving a copy may obtain the same 
ac the President's office. 



ATTEND MEETINGS 

Professors A. E. Martin, J. E. Gil- 
lespie, W. F. Dunaway, and R. C. 
Hanaway of the Department of History 
and Political Science attended the meet- 
ings of the American Historical As- 
sociation in Richmond, Virginia, dm^ing 
the holidays. 

Professors Jacob Tanger and B. M. 
Hermann, of the same department 
attended the meetings of the American 
Political Science Association also, in 
Washington. 



ARCHITECTURAL J.E^rpr 
Dean E, S. Camnbell. of ■ 

Arts Institute of Deris' "" 

t~> students of the D : 
itecture on sketching 
oil Thursday evening, Jam 
7:30 in Room 24 En 



CENTRE HILLS MEETING 
The annual meeting of the n ' i 
Hills Country Clvd vill ' 
Wednesday eve ' 
7:"0 in the club 



election of officers of the University 
Club will be held on Monday evening. 
January 19, at 8:00. All members are 
urged to attend. 



E.W.RUNKLE . 

2 1 LIBERA L A R T S 



; 



- 



'ublished every Tuesday 
ing the college year as a 
ins of making- official an- 
mcements and presenting 
as of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania 



■ j 



JL^7 



College 



11 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



LUME 4 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

CHEMISTRY AM) PHYSICS 

rhere will be a meeting of the fac- 
y of the School of Chemistry and 
ysics this afternoon (Tuesday) at 
10, in the Physics Lecture Room. — 
C Chandlee, secretary. 



EXAMINATION ROOMS' 

Instructors who desire rooms in 
ich to hold final examinations, sched- 
■d toy appointment, should arrange 
the same with the College Sched- 
ng Officer before January 26. — C. E. 
Dinger. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

during the past week the following 
jdents have left college: 
4 Ayers, John P., NS 

3 Fell, Edward W., CF 

4 Harvey, Prank, Mug 

3 Johnson, Harold Y., CP 
3 Johnson, W. W., CF 

3 Liggett, W. ,S., EE 

A Pawson, G. R., 2 yr. Ag. 

4 Polhemus, J. R., Agr. Econ . 

3 Schomaker, C. F., CF 

4 Winebrenner, C. W., CF 



MID-YEAR GRADUATES 

The following names should be add- 
to the list of mid-year graduates 
en in last week's Bulletin: 
Hornauer, H. P., PL 
Roy, M. P., AL 
Showalter, H. M., Ed. 
iStrickler, K. E., CF 
Yeagley, H. L., Ech 
Jrades for these seniors should be 
liiorted as indicated in last week's 
Ijlletin. 

[|rhe name of E. M. Fee, AL, should be 
jlken from the list. It should also be 
s|ted that the course of B. A. Shreve 
|j CF and not ME as previously an-) 
■unced. 



COMMENCEMENT 



I The College Senate at last week's 
fceting adopted the following report 
P| the combined committee on Student 
^el-fare and Commencement Program: 
The paragraphs relative to Com- 
mencement given in Regulations Af- 
fcting Students to be altered aecord- 
■I? to the following action, which al- 
ii supersedes any conflicting action 
:bviously taken. 

I'l. That instead of the provision 
| Senior Week, any fraternity chap- 
fv enjoying full social privileges be 
I'mitfed to have a two-day house 
rty during the second semester at 
V week-end that the chapter may 
<'iide upon. 



State College, Pa., January 20, 1925 



NUMBER 16 



"2. That for Commencement Week, 
from Friday until Monday, inclusive, 
the alumni, seniors, and juniors of any 
chapter may arrange such form of 
social entertainment in the chapiter 
house as they may decide upon, pro- 
viding always that sophomores and 
freshmen do not participate." 



SENIOR EXAMINATIONS 

The following action concerning ex- 
aminations for seniors was taken by 
the Senate at its January meeting: 

"No senior examinations are to be 
scheduled at the end of the second 
semester." 

This does not mean that examina- 
tions may not be given during the last 
meetings of the class. It applies also 
to those courses not usually taken toy 
seniors, tout in which one or two may 
be scheduled. 

The purpose of this action is not to 
do away with examinations, tout rather 
to shorten the examination period'. 
The last week of both the first and sec- 
ond semesters will be listed as exam- 
ination week. 



SENATE ACTION ON RE -EXAMS 

At the January meeting of the Col- 
lege Senate last week, a recommenda- 
tion of the Committee on Academic 
Standards was approved, abrogating 
Article 36 of the Regulations Affecting- 
Students and adopting the following- 
regulations : 

"(a) "When condition grades (-1) 
are to toe removed by re-examjination, 
such examinations shall be scheduled 
during the week preceding registration 
for the fall semester, the specific days 
'to be determined by the College Cal- 
endar committee of the Senate. This 
regulation shall apply to all condition 
grades incurred in any semester or 
summer session. 

"(b) When any subject is designat- 
ed as a prerequisite for subsequent 
work, a student shall have satisfied the 
prerequisite requirement if he has re- 
ceived a grade of -1 or higher in the 
prerequisite subject prior to the re- 
examination in that subject." 

This action goes into effect follow- 
ing the examinations at the end of this 
semester; that is, at once. 

Re-examinations for seniors, at the 
end of the first semester, may be ar- 
ranged by petition to the school in 
which the senior is enrolled. 



A. A. A. S. 

The local branch of the American 
Association for the Advancement of 
Science will hold a meeting on Wed- 
nesday evening, January 28, at 7:30 
in Room 200, Old Mining Building. 
Dean F. D. Kern will give an illus- 
trated talk, "My Trip to Porto Rico." 
This is an open meeting and the public 
is invited. 



CALENDAR 

TUESDAY, January 20 

Chemistry and Physics faculty meet- 
ing, 4:30, Physics Lecture Room. 

SATURDAY, January 24 

Wrestling, Perm State vs. Muhlen- 
tou-rg, 2:30; basketball, Penn State vs. 
Gettysburg, 7:00; Freshmen vs. Gettys- 
burg Freshmen, S:30. 

SUNDAY, January 2."> 

Chapel Speaker— Dr. Floyd W. Tom- 
kins, Church of the Holy Trinity, Phil- 
adelphia. 



REPOSITLNO SALARY CHECKS 

In response to numerous requests 
from members of the faculty, the col- 
lege treasurer makes the following 
statement concerning the depositing of 
s: lary checks: 

"Members of the faculty desiring 
their salary checks deposited in the 
lx:nk by the Treasurer on the first of 
each month will please notify the 
Treasurer's Office in writing, giving 
the name of the bank." 

o 

DR. PATTEE'S NEW BOOK 

"Tradition and Jazz" is the name of 
the latest book from the pen of Pro- 
fessor F. L. Pattee, which is now be- 
ing- published by the Century Company. 
The book is a series of essays all of 
which have appeared in magazines 
and nearly all of which were written 
la ;t year while Professor Pattee was 
on leave of -absence. The new volume 
will increase the number of Professor 
Pattee's books to more than twenty- 
five. 



DR. R1TENOUR HONORED 

Dr. J. P. Ritenour, Director of the 
Health Service, attended the annual 
meeting of the American Student 
Health Association in New York dur- 
ing the holidays, and at the business 
session he was honored by toeing elect- 
ed vice-president of the association. 



FARM PRODUCTS SHOW 

Most of the members of the agricul- 
tural faculty and all of the agricul- 
tural extension specialists are in Har- 
ristourg this week for the annual Farm 
Products Show. Penn State represent- 
atives are due to give talks on prac- 
tically all of the various specialized 
programs that have been arranged. 



TRUSTEES MEET 

The annual mid-winter meeting of 
the Board of Trustees of the College 
takes place at Harrisburg this after- 
noon. The executive committee meets 
this morning. 



E.W.RUNKLE, 

21 L 1BEF.AL ARTS 



- 



Published every Tuesday 
luring the college year as a 
neans of making official an- 
louncements and presenting 
terns of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 




Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



OLUME 4 



State College, Pa., January 27, 1925 



NUMBER 17 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

SENIOR EXAMINATIONS 

The recent action of the Senate to 
he effect that no senior examinations 
re to be scheduled at the end of the 
econd semester applies to seniors en- 
olled in junior, sophomore, and fresh- 
man section? but does not apply to 
thers than seniors enrolled in such 
ections. — W. S. Hoffman, Registrar. 

o 

GRADE REPORTS 

The attention of all instructors is 
ailed to the action of the Council of 
ulministration under date of January 
4, 1924, as follows: 

"All grades at the end of any sem- 
ster are due at the offices of the deans 
nd of the Registrar one week after 
he date of the final examination; but 
i -case there is no final examination, 
ne week after the last meeting of the 
lass." 

In addition to this action, the Reg- 
strar is required to report delinquent 
instructors to the deans concerned. — 
V. S. Hoffman, Registrar. 



REGISTRATION 

Second semester registration will 
ike place this week on Wednesday, 
hursday, Friday, and Saturday until 
joon. Registration posters giving de- 
Viled information have been placed on 
jll bulletin boards and in the deans' 
jfioes. First semester classes will end 
ti Sunday at noon and mid-year ex- 
j.ninations are scheduled for the week 
!: February 2 to 7 inclusive. The 
lork of the second semester will begin 
' 8:00 a.m. on Monday, February 9. 

o 

STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 

udents have left college: 
U Elliott, Gilbert IB., AL 

2 Stewart, James W., IE 
(A Watson, Samuel R., 2 yr. Ag. 



! PRE- MEDICAL CURRICULUM 

By action of the Board of Trustees 
I their meeting" in Harrisburg last 
eek, the admi listration of the Pre- 
[fidical curricu um has been trans- 
irred from the School of Agriculture 
I the School of Chemistry and Phys- 
3. The change is effective at once, 
lit Professor Dusham wijl conduct 
|e registration for the second sem- 
ter as in the past. 



BIO-COLLOIDS 



/ -j 



iT" 



A. ^h^po-^red't pnnrse 'n bio-r-fVlo'ds 
U r Pin-h"rn. 2fi) will be offered fo- 
,, „ ,^„^ . rmp5 t or f t n ; P vear. hours 
1 hp ir'">TT?ed. This course does not 
ipear in the schedule book. Full in- 
•mat'on Tni" b° nh+ainod f rnm Pro- 
ber M W. T,isse, 212 Agricultural 
I ilding. 



WHY STUDENTS DROP OUT 

During the present semester to date 
91 students have withdrawn from col- 
lege for definite reasons as given here- 
with. This number, however, does not 
represent the actual number that have 
left, since some few students .each 
year slip away without the college 
learning of the fact until accumulated 
absences bring it to the attention of 
the administration. Reasons given for 
withdrawal are as follows: 

Illness. 2G 

Financial 20 

No reason 12 

Family troubles 8 

Poor scholarship 7 

Transfer to other college 5 

Entered business 4 

Poor preparation 3 

Dissatisfaction 3 

Homesickness 2 

Married 1 

Total 91 

Included in the group of seven who 
left because of poor scholarship arc 
four who were required to withdraw. 
According to classes, the number leav- 
ing has been as follows : 

Seniors 1 

Juniors 5 

Sophomores 35 

Freshmen 44 

Two-Year Ags 6 

Total 91 

o- 

TRUSTEE'S ELECT 

At the meeting of the Board of Trust- 
ees in Harrisburg last week the fol- 
lowing officers were re-elected: Pres- 
ident, Judge H. Walton Mitchell, Pitts- 
burgh; vice-president, J. G. White, 
New York; secretary, Dr. John M. 
Thomas, State College; and treasurer, 
W. G. Murtorff, State College. 

The following trustees were elected 
members of the executive committee: 
Judge Mitchell; Vance C. McCormick, 
Harrisburg; E. L. Orvis, Belief onte; 
E. R. Pettebone, Scranton; J. F. 
Shields, Philadelphia; H. D. B,rown, 
Williamsport; and C. J. Tyson, Flora-' 
dale. 

— o 

AGRICULTURAL PROGRAM 

A series of meetings and discussions 
dealing with various phases of agri- 
cultural investigation and instruction 
has been arranged by the School of 
Agriculture to be held at the Univers- 
ity Club at 8:00 p.m. on the first Mon- 
day of each month for the remainder 
of the college year. The first program 
wil be given on Monday evening, Feb- 
ruary 2. Dean Watts will ispeak on 
"Policy Concerning the Development 
of the School of Agriculture and Ex- 
periment Station," while Professor E 
B. Forbes will discuss "Research in 
Relation to Agricultural Needs." Any 
faculty member interested is invited 
to attend these programs. 



CALENDAR 



WEDNESDAY, January 28 

A. A. A. S. meeting, 7:30, 200 Old 
Mining Building. Talk by Dr. F. D. 
Kern on "My Trip to Porto Rico." 
FRIDAY, January 30 
Ladies Night at University Club. 
Dinner and dance. Make reservations 
for dinner with the Steward by Wed- 
nesday. 

SATURDAY, January 31 
Interclass wrestling meet, Armory, 
2:30. 

SUNDAY, February 1 
Chapel Speaker — Dr. Metzger. 

TUESDAY EVENING LECTURES 

The fifteenth annual Tuesday Even- 
ing Free Lecture Course offered by the 
School of Liberal Arts will open tonight 
when President Thomas will be the 
speaker. This lecture and those that 
follow will be given in the Old Chapel 
at 7:00 p.m. His subject will be "A 
Few Popular Poems — Some in Dialect." 

The committee in charge of the pro- 
gram this year has reduced the number 
of lectures to five, one to be given on 
the last Tuesday evening of each month 
from now until June. In addition to 
President Thomas, subsequent speak- 
ers will be Professor G. R. Green, Dean 
G. L. Wendt, Dr. F. L. Pattee, and 
Dr. H. P. W. de Visme. 



-o- 



PENN STATE PLAYERS 

The Penn State Players will stage a 
second performance of "Kempy" in the 
Auditorium on Saturday evening, Feb- 
ruary 7. When given for the first 
time last fall, "Kempy" proved to be 
one of the most successful plays ever 
staged by the Players and it was ex- 
tremely well received not only in State 
College but also in Roaring Spring, 
Sunbury, and Harrisburg. 

Tickets may be secured at any time 
during the next two weeks at the State 
Shirt Shop, the price being fifty and 
seventy-five cents. Faculty members 
who missed the performance last fall 
should not fail to take advantage of 
the second showing. 



UNIVERSITY CLUB ELECTS 

At the annual meeting of the Uni- 
versity Club last week the following 
officers were elected for the ensuing 
year: 

President, W. S. Dye, Jr.; vice-pres- 
ident, D. F. MoFarland; secretary, P. 
•L. Fatout; treasurer, W. W. Braman; 
directors, J. L. Holmes and J. E. De- 
Camp. 

By special action of the club mem- 
bers. Professors E. D. Walker and T. 
L. Foster, both charter members of 
the club who have been tireless in their 
efforts to serve the organization, were 
elected as honorary life members and 
were presented with illuminated cer- 
tificates of the action. 



- i> 



V 



2 1 LIBERAL ARTS 



Published every Tuesday 
iring the college year as a 
eans of making' official an- 
iUncements and presenting 
ims of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



)LUME 4 



State College, Pa., February 3, 1925 



NUMBER 18 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

MAY MOVE EXAMINATION 

The Registrar will not object to an 
Imination scheduled for Saturday 
iernoon toeing moved forward to some 
hier period. This is due to the wrest- 
k meet with the University of Penn- 
jvania scheduled for .the Armory that 
f.ernoon. — W. iS. Hoffman, Registrar. 

o 

{REGISTERING NEW STUDENTS 

Second semester registration for new 
iidents and for former students re- 
ining after atosenee of a semester or 
lire will take place on Friday, Feb- 
Lry 6, all day. The Armory will not 
[ used for this registration. Posters 
ing detailed information have been 
iced on all bulletin boards and in the 
ffls' offices. 



GRADE REPORTS 

he attention of all instructors is 
pin called to the regulation concern- 
grade reports. All grades at the 
Ji of any semester are due at the 
ices of the deans and of the Registrar 
3 week after the date of the final 
imination; but in case there is no 
jal examination, one week after the 
ft meeting of the class. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

.During the past week the following 
idente have left college: 

2 Hitchcock, J. G., AE 

4 RamJbo, C. B., Agri 

4 'Scott, IC. S., CE 

4 Triibby, K. S., PL 

TRUSTEE MEETINGS 

|M; a meeting of the executive com- 
jttee of the Board of Trustees held on 
jnuary 20, the following resolution 
Is adopted: 

'Meeting's of the Executive Commit? 
>: The Committee shall hold regular 
stings in connection with and prior 
I the meetings of the Board in Janu- 
y and June of each year, and also 
! the second Fridays of March, May, 
■ptemiber, October, and December, 
.ecial meetings may be called as pre- 
yibed for meetings of the Board of 
justees, and any regular meeting may 
J omitted or the date thereof changed 
j order of the President of the Board."' 



PA. ACADEMY OF SCIENCE 

[Che Pennsylvania Academy of Sci- 
pe, formed last year, is now well es- 
'ilished as was indicated by the en- 
isiastie meeting in November. Mem- 
J's of the faculty working in both 
[re and applied science are eligible 
membership and are urged to join 
organization. Application blanks 
y toe ototained from Dr. J. P. Kelly, 
the Botany Building. 



CALLED EOR CONFERENCE 

President Thomas has received an in- 
vitation from the Committee on Educa- 
tion of the State Senate to appear be- 
fore them for a conference. The chair- 
man of the committee was quoted in 
news dispatches as stating that this 
was a 'preliminary step to a meeting 
with the college Board of Trustees to 
consider what steps may be necessary 
to make this college the State institu- 
tion for higher education in Pennsyl- 
vania. 

it is likely that Dr. Thomas will ap- 
pear before the committee some time 
next week. First intimation that the 
committee bad such a project on foot 
was received by college authorities 
when the invitation came to the Presi- 
dent. 



CALENDAR 



APPROPRIATION BILLS 

The College appropriation bills were 
resented in the House last week by 
the Honorable John L. Holmes, and in 
the Senate by Senator Schantz, who is 
chairman of the Senate Appropriations 
Committee. They call for a total of 
$4,323,220 for maintenance and agricul- 
tural extension, and $2,000,000 for build- 
ings. The resolution calling for an 
$8,000,000 bond issue for college build- 
ings was presented in the Senate by 
Senator William I. Betts. It was pass- 
ed unanimously by both houses two 
years ago and if it passes again this 
session, will go ibefore the people in the 
general election next fall. 



THE LAND GRANT COLLEGES 

More than one-third of all college 
students in the United States are en- 
rolled in the land grant colleges and 
universities, according to figures com- 
piled toy Professor A. H. Espenshade. 
There are 52 of these state institution.--, 
Penn State being the Pennsylvania 
unit in the chain formed in the pass- 
age of the Morrill Act of Congress in 
1562. 

The total number of persons gradu- 
ated from all colleges in the United 
States since the beginning of our ed- 
ucational history about 300 years ago, 
i.3 825,474. Of this number fully one- 
fourth have been graduated from the 
kind grant colleges during the past 
25 years, according to Professor Es- 
penshade who obtains his figures 
largely from Federal educational re- 
ports. 

The latest enrollment figures show 
that there are about 604,000 men and 
women attending colleges and univer- 
sities this year. To show how the de- 
mand for college service has increased 
in recent years, it should be noted that 
this total is seventy per cent of the 
total number of persons graduated 
from American colleges since their be- 
ginning. Of this total enrollment, the 
lsnd grant colleges boast 214,000 stu- 
dents, or considerably more than thir- 
ty per cent. 



FRIDAY, February 6 

Registration of new students. 
SATURDAY, February 7 

Penn State vs. Penn, wrestling, 2:30; 
Penn State freshmen vs. Pitt, basket- 
ball, 6:30; Penn State vs. Pitt, basket- 
toall, 8:00. 

Penn State Players in "Kempy", 8:15, 
Auditorium. 

SUNDAY, February 8 

No Chapel — Between semester holi- 
day. 

TUESDAY, February 10 

Mid-Year Convocation, 7:30, Auditor- 
ium. 

MID-YEAR CONVOCATION 

The annual Mid- Year Commencement 
exercises will take place in the Audi- 
torium next Tuesday evening, February 
10, at 7:30. A class of approximately 
fifty men and women will receive bach- 
elor degrees, while eight advanced de- 
grees will also toe conferred. President 
Thomas will confer the degrees and 
make the address. 

Faculty members are urged to attend 
the exercises. Academic costume is re- 
quested where possible but is not ne- 
cessary. The faculty will meet at 7:00 
in the Foyer. Members of the gradu- 
ating class and candidates for advanc- 
ed degrees will meet in the North room 
of the Foyer at the same hour. 



ADVISORY COMMITTEES 

The executive committee of the Board 
of Trustees at its last meeting adopted 
the following resolution: 

"Committees on Schools: The Presi- 
dent of the Board of Trustees may ap- 
point a committee on each or any school 
of the College, including the Institute 
of Animal Nutrition, to serve until the 
January meeting of the Board next 
succeeding their appointment. Such 
committees shall have no legislative or 
executive powers and their function 
shall be solely advisory to the Board of 
Trustees, through the President of the 
(College, on matters pertaining to the 
school to which they are designated. 
In his discretion the President of the 
Board may appoint, in addition to mem- 
bers of the Board, as members of such 
committees, alumni of the College or 
other persons. The President of the 
Board and the President of the Col- 
lege shall be ex-offlcio members of all 
such committees. 



"KEMPY" 

A second performance of "Kempy" 
will be staged by the Penn State Play- 
ers in the Auditorium on Saturday eve- 
ning, February 7. Tickets are now on 
sale at the State Shirt Shop or may toe 
obtained at the toox office on the night 
of the performance. Price, 50 and 75 
cents. 



«.*^ E - 



o'i 



rS 



7.1 



l> I 



6 t 



F.F.^ 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
terns of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a.m. each Saturday. 



7 0LUME 4 



State College, Pa., February 10, 1925 



NUMBER 19 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



CHANGES IN ROOMS 

Instructors desiring rooms for app- 
ointment classes or changes in rooms 
s scheduled must consult the College 
Scheduling Officer. 



MID-TEAK FRESHMEN 

Incomplete figures announced by the 
[Registrar ■ on Saturday of last week 
Indicate an incoming class of about 50 
(Veshmen for the second semester. 
Irhis is approximately the same number 
hat entered at mid-year in 1924. 



STU 1) E NTS WIT H DRAW 

During the past week the fallowing 
tudents have left college: 
3 Althouse, H L., EE 
3 Ashcroft, J. M., CF 
3 Barber, E. L., ChE 
3 Biecker, H. R. D., EE 
3 Buchanan, T. J., Agro 
3 Buck, N. M., CE 

3 Burtt, V. T., OE 

4 Campbell, M. A., Ag.Ec 
3 Closser, H. T„ AH 

3 Dye, C. H., CP 

4 Field, H., NiS 

4 Flthian, H. R., CF 

3 Fry, M. E., Ed 

3 Graham, David, ME 

3 Green, M. W., Ed 

4 Guthrie, P. F., PL 
4 HanaJble, W. S., CE 

3 Haupt, L. C, Ed 

4 Hancock, W. A., ME 
1 Hess, Gertrude, LA 

'3 Hoffman, Victoria, IE 
A Jones, N. B., 2 yr. Ag 
4 Kern, P. R., ME 
4 Miller, E. F., ME 

3 Nissley, J. L., FF 

4 Parks. G. E., ChA 

4 Parsons, W. F., AgEc 

A Pressman, .Ralph, 2 yr.Ag 

4 Quick, C. W., EE 

4 Raskin, Morton, PL 

A Reynolds, G. F., 2 yr.Ag 

•4 Rosenson, Clarence, AL 

3 Rowland, Edwin, CF 

4 Ryan, P. V., Ag.Ed 

3 Schrock, A. T., OF 

4 Shearer, W. W., Ech 

A iStambaugh, W. G., 2 yr.Ag 
3 Sutphen, R. B., CF 

3 JTerwilliger, J. C, CF 

4 Wallace, W. J., CF 

5 Walley, F. J., CE 

4 Watson, J. A., Agro 



3 Welch, J. K„ FF 

4 Williams, C. E., CF 

3 Williams, N. H., Mn§ 

4 Wilson, F. R., DH 



CALENDAR 



EXCUSES FOE SICKNESS 

Dr. Ritenour, director of the Health 
Service, wishes to inform faculty mem- 
bers that the Health 'Service issues two 
types of certificates for absence from 
class on account of illness. One, print- 
ed on white paper, is a recommendation 
to instructors that the individual be 
excused or permitted to make up the 
missed work. This certificate is issued 
only to those who have been treated 
by the Health Service or who have 
presented satisfactory evidence of hav- 
ing "been treated by a reputable physic- 
ian. 

The other, printed on yellow paper. 
is a statement issued to a student who 
has absented himself from class on ac- 
count of illness but who has not been 
treated by the Health Service or a 
physician. This is not a recommenda- 
tion that the student be excused or 
permitted to make up the work, but 
is a statement that the student has 
come to the Health Service, after re- 
covery, and stated the facts 'pertaining 
to the illness which are desired for 
statistical purposes. 

It is the desire of the Health Ser- 
vicee to have all students visit the 
dispensary at the first evidence of ill- 
ness in order that proper treatment 
can be instituted if necessary. Many 
students do not avail themselves of the 
privilege of the Health Service but 
stay away from classes when they 
think they are too ill to attend, coming 
to the Health Service later for an ex- 
cuse. It is with an idea of breaking 
up this practice and getting the stu- 
dents into the dispensary with the on- 
set of disease, that the two types of 
certificates are issued. 

If instructors will bear this in. mind 
and permit only those presenting white 
certificates to make up the wortk miss- 
ed, it will aid materially in getting 
students to apply for advice or treat- 
ment early in the disease when it will 
do the most good. 

o ■ 

PENNSYLVANIA PLACE NAMES 

Professor Espenshade has received 
nearly 800 advance orders for his 
"Pennsylvania Place Names." An edi- 
tion of at least 1000 copies is assured 
The hook is now in the hands of the 
printer and publication is promised 
early in April. Over 100 orders have 
been received from State College — 
mebers of the faculty and townspeople. 
The book has met with the hearty en- 
dorsement of the chairman of the State 
Historical Cormmission, Colonel Henry 
W. .Shoemaker, who has read the man- 
uscript. 



TUESDAY, February 10 

Mid-year Convocation, 7:30, Audi- 
torium. 

Flfl DAY, February 13 

Harold Bauer, recital, S:15, Auditor- 
ium. 

SATURDAY, February 11 

Basketball, Penn State vs. Lebanon 
Valley, 7:00; Freshmen vs. Bucknell 
Freshmen, 8:00. 

SUNDAY, February 15 

Chapel Speaker - The Reverend Ed- 
gar F. Romig, Collegiate (Church, New 
York City. 

THURSDAY, February 19 

College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Audi- 
torium. 



MID-YEAR GRADUATION 

A class of fifty men and women will 
receive bachelor degrees at the Mid- 
Year Commencement exercises in the 
Auditorium tonight at 7:30. Nine ad- 
vanced degrees will also be conferred. 
President Thomas will make the address 
and award the diplomas. Members of 
the faculty are urged to attend and to 
form in the Foyer at 7:00. Academic 
costume is not necessary but is desir- 
able where possible. 

The following are candidates for ad- 
vanced degrees: 

Master of Arts — Arthur L. Funk, Ec- 
nomics; Frank B. Hege, History; El- 
eanor B. North, English; and Cloyd E. 
Zeiders, Education. 

Master of Science — Frank L. Foll- 
weiller, Agricultural Chemistry; Paul 
R. Haeseler, Chemistry; Charles M. 
Roberts, Botany; Raymond W. Swift, 
Animal Nutrition. 

Mechanical Engineer — William R. 
Young. 

o 

NOTED PIANIST TO PLAY 

The fifth number of the Y r . M. C. A. 
and Department of Music entertain- 
ment course is scheduled for Friday 
evening, February 13, when Harold 
Bauer, world renowned pianist, will 
appear in the Auditorium at 8:15. He 
has prepared a most pleasing program 
for his Penn State appearance. Tick- 
ets may be obtained at the "Y" Hut. 

o 

CONTRIBUTES ARTICLE 

Dean Wendt contributed a leading 
article to the Educational Supplemc vt 
of the New Republic, issue of Febru- 
ary 4. His article, entitled "To Under- 
stand the Universe," is a critical re- 
port of the recent meeting of the 
American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science held in Washington, 
D. C. 



-bill 
edi a 

lO ar(9Cf ; f!"' r ' 






2 7 



J S £ p , 



HL A &. T 



-'-: 



Published every Tuesday 
uring the college year as a 
leans of making official an- 
ouncements and presenting 
ems of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



OLUME 4 



State College, Pa., February 17, 1925 



NUMBER 20 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



COLLEGE SENATE 

The February meeting of the College 
>nate will be held on Thursday eve- 
ng of this 'week at 7:30, in the Foyer 
the Auditorium. 



AGRICULTURAL FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the fae- 
ty of the School of Agriculture on 
hursday, February 19, at 4:30, in 
oom 206 Agricultural Building. — R. L. 
r atts, dean. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

There- will be a meeting of the fac- 
ty of the School of Education on 
uesday, February 17, at 4:30, in Room 
1, Old Main.— H. G. Parkinson, sec- 
tary. 



GRADUATE FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the fac- 
ty of the Graduate School on Wed- 
<sday, February 18, at 4:30, in the 
)yer of the Auditorium. All members 
< the staff having immediate super- 
s-ion of graduate courses, as weW as 
". administrative officers, are mem- 
rs of the Graduate faculty. No 
her notice of this meeting will be 
ven. — F. D. Kern, dean. 



COPY OF SCHEDULE 

Each member of the teaching staff 
ill please send to the Scheduling 
jflcer, before February 28, a copy of 
ijs actual schedule, indicating the room 
lumber and building) and the num- 
| r of students in each class. 
lOffice hours of the Scheduling Officer 
f the present semester will be Mondav, 
jtesday, and Thursday, 1:30 to 5:00; 
|td Friday and Saturday, 8:00 to 12:00. 
C. E. BuMing-e-iv 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the pas! week the following 
bdents have left college: 

2 Blair, Charles D., PM 

3 Burtner, J. EL, FF 

3 Bush, J. L., AE 
|4 Carson, Abe, OF 

14 Caudill, E. D., IjA 

4 Donges, G. H., CF 
! 3 Epstein, J. H., CF 

4 Euwer, G. A., NS 
4 Graham, J. M., IE 
'• Kelly, J. S., ME 
|3 Kr'ebel. B. M., IE 
ashner, Sidney, PM 
all W. B., CF 
itsa, V. M., CE 

n-v.vi -p ' I < 
n 'n, J. E . Mng 
" ; " "<"■ F R.. Ed 

' n z. R. E.. CF 
--■„ . rc . G A EH 



DISTRIBUTION OF PENN 

STATE WOMEN STUDENTS 

That the country girl has more than 
ar. equal chance of entering the Penn- 
sylvania State College with her city 
ccusin is disclosed by a recent survey 
of the list of women students in attend- 
ance completed by Professor A. H. 
Espenshade, former registrar of the 
college. Starting with his definition of 
"Urban" and "Rural", Professor Es- 
penshade finds as follows : 

"Urban population is defined by the' 
Census Bureau as including the people 
living in cities and towns that have 
a population of 2500 or more. Ail] the 
rest of the population of a given area 
is classified as rural population. 

"According to this definition the Cen- 
sus Bureau gives urban population of 
Pennsylvania for 1920 as 5.607.815, and 
the rural population as 3,112,202. That 
is to say, 64.3 per cent of the popula- 
tion is urban, and 35.7 per cent is 
rural. 

"The question is often asked, 'In the 
pressure for admission at The Pennsy- 
lvania State College, do the countrv 
girl-s have a fair chance- of entering?' 
The statement is often made that the 
girls from the villages and the country 
are crowded out by the girls from the 
cities and large towns. 

"This statement, which is based im- 
on supposition and not upon facts, is 
simply untrue. This year (1924-25) The 
Pennsylvania State College has 380 
girls listed in its student directory. Tf 
these were apportioned to urban pop- 
ulation and to rural population strictly 
according to the percentage of total 
population in each group, there should 
be 244 girls coming from the urban 
population, and 136 girls from the 
rural population. In point of fact, the 
total number of girls listed in the stu- 
dent directory for 1924-25 is almost 
evenly divided between the two groups, 
as follows: Urban, 193; Rural 187. 

"It should be pointed out that in th? 
rural group there are included 53 girl 
students from the borough of State 
College, who live at their homes and 
therefore do not require dormitory ac- 
commodations. 

"While The Pennsylvania State Col- 
lege renders its educational service 
without respect to creed, occupation, 
social position, or place of residence, 
there can be no doubt that in propor- 
tion to the population a larger num- 
ber of well-prepared girls from the 
vuraQ group than from the urban group 
apply for admission and are actually- 
admitted to the College." 
o 

SALE OF MEAT 

Meat can be purchased at the college 
meat shop in the stock judging pavil- 
ion throughout the second semester at 
th° hmirs 10:00 to 12:00 a. m., daily 
throughout the week with the excen- 
t'nn of Wednesdav. On Saturdav meat 
will be on sale from 9:00 to 12:00. 



CALENDAR 

TUESDAY, February 17 

Education faculty, 4:30. Room 321, 
Old Main. 

American Association of University 
Professors meeting, 8:00, Room 220, 
Old Mining. 

WEDNESDAY, February is 
Graduate faculty, 4:30, Foyer. 
THURSDAY, February lit 

Agricultural faculty, 4:30, Room 206 
Ag. 
College- Senate, 7:30, Foyer. 

FRIDAY, February L»l» 

[Ladies Night at the University Club. 
Dinner and dancing. Make reserva- 
tirns for dinner with the steward by 
Wednesday. 

SATURDAY, February 21 

Athletic pro ram: Navy, boxing. 2:30; 
Notre Dame, baskebbal 1 , 7:00; Lehigh, 
wrestling, 8:00. 

SUNDAY, February '22 

Chapel Services to be conducted by 
the Y. M. C. A. 

TUESDAY, February 24 

Liberal Arts Lecture, Profes ir 
Green, "Animals in Winter." 

PENN STATE PLAYERS 

"The Whole Town's . Talking," the 
popular farce of John Emerson and 
Anita Loos, will be presented in the 
Auditorium on Friday evening, Febru- 
ary 27, by the Penn -State Players. A 
strong cast has been selected and the 
production is under the direction of D. 
D. Mason. This play promises to be 
one of the funniest of the year. 

Tickets are on sale daily at the State 
Shirt Shop. The price is fifty and sev- 
enty-five cents. 

o 

NOTED CHEMIST TO SPEAK 

Dr. Graham Lusk, a noted physiolo- 
gist and physiological chemist, will 
speak at Penn State on March 3, under 
the auspices of the American Chemical 
Societ5 r and the Association for the 
Advancement of Science. Dr. Lusk is 
an international authority in the field 
of animal physiology and animal cal- 
orimetry. All members of the faculty 
and the general public are invited to 
hear him. 



A. A. A. S. ELECTIONS 

At a recent meeting of the local 
branch of the American Association 
for the Advancement of Science the 
following officers were- elected: Pres- 
ident. J. Ben Hill; vice-president, D. 
C. Duncan; secretary. R. H. Dotterer; 
treasurer. Mrs. Pauline Beery Mack; 
executive committee members, C. F. 
Noll and R. L. Sackett 



or •?■ ■ i 



E.W.KUNKU, 



„, LIBERA- ^ 



R T S 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 



Contributions must be a-s 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



VOLUME 4 



State College, Pa., February 24, 1925 



NUMBER 21 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
students have left college: 
A Breed, W. E., Two-Year Ag 
3 Caldwell, C. D., Mng 
3 Dubbs, J. S., PM 
3 Ploy, H. R., Probation Section 

2 Knoch, H. M., Ch 

3 (Locke, K. D., ChE 

A McQueeney, T. J., Two-Year Ag 

4 Mansfield, M. L., PM 

A Mover, T. S., Two-Year Ag 
4 iScott, Sarah E., Ed 
4 iSznyter, E. F., Ag 
3 Yeager, G. H., IEd 



o 

STUDENT RE-ENTERED 

Attention of instructors concerned is 
palled to the fact that the following 
student who had withdrawn has re- 
sntered college: 

3 Hoffman, Victoria, IE 



FACULTY CHESS PLAYERS 

Members of the faculty who enjoy a 
game of chess are invited to meet at 
the University Club on Friday evening, 
February 27, at 7:30. Lunch will be 
jserved for which a .charge of thirty- 
five cents will be made. Provide your 
|}wn smokes, and bring board and men 
If possible. 

A ismall group of faculty men have 
been playing chess at the homes of the 
[members at irregular times during the 
ipast four years. At the last meeting 
in organization was effected and it was 
decided to enlarge the membership and 
|hold meetings at the University Club, 
fct is hoped that all who have an inter- 
bst in chess will find it possible to at- 
tend this first meeting. 



| APPROVES COLLEGE REQUEST 

J The illness of President Thomas pre- 
sented his appearance before the State 
jSenate Committee on Education at 
Harrisburg last Tuesday, Judge H. 
Walton Mitchell representing Penn 
State at the conference. The Com- 
Imittee, following the meeting at which 
[representatives of the University of 
jPennsylvania and University of Pitts- 
burgh were also on hand, voiced its 
Istrong approval of the $6,000,000 leg- 
islative appropriation request for Penn 
State, including the item of $2,000,000 
for new buildings. 



AGRICULTURAL DISCUSSION 

The second of the monthly meetings 
dealing with agricultural investigation 
jand instruction will take place at the 
jUniversity Club on Monday evening, 
'March 2, at 8:00. R. G. Bressler will dis- 
cuss "The Teacher's Obligation to His 
Student," and R. A. Dutcher will take 
up "The Relation of Research to the 
Classroom." Faculty members of other 
schools are invited. 



COMMENCEMENT PROGRAM 
At the meeting of the College Senate 
last week, the report of the Commence- 
ment Program Committee was adopted, 
subject to minor revisions in time, etc., 
as they may become necessary. The 
program follows: 

Friday, June 12 (Senior-Junior Day) 
5:00 p.m. — Alumni Association busin- 
ess meeting, Auditorium. 
6:00 p.m. — Alumni Dinner, seniors and 

guests included. 
7:30 p.m. — Alumni-Senior- Junior, good 
fellowship mixer, Front Campus, 
with band concert and singing. 
8:30 p.m. — Alumni-Senior- Junior dance 

Armory. 
8:30 p.m.— Penn State Players, Audit- 
orium. 
Saturday, June 13 (Alumni Day) 
10:15 a.m. — Alumni-Senior baseball 

game, New Beaver. 
12:30 p.m. — Alumni, faculty, seniors, 
and guests, a la carte luncheon 
on campus. 
2:00 p.m. — Senior Class welcomed into 
alumni body by the Alumni As- 
sociation president, Front Cam- 
pus. Address by President 
Thomas. Parade by classes to 
New Beaver for baseball game. 
3:15 p.m. — Varsity baseball game. 
6:00 p.m. — Class banquets and reun- 
ions. 
7:00 p.m. — Thespians, Auditorium. 
9:00 p.m. — Dances in fraternity houses 
and Armory. 
Sunday, June 14 (Baccalaureate Sun- 
day) 
10:30 a.m. — Baccalaureate Sermon. Au- 
ditorium. Admission by card. 
2:30 p.m. — Band concert, Front Cam- 
pus. 
6:30 p.m. — Vesper service, Open Air 

Theatre. 
8:00 p.m. — Concert, Auditorium. 
Monday, June 15 (Commencement Day) 
10:00 a.m. — Senior Class Day exercises, 

Open Air Theatre. 
12:00 m. — Senate luncheon to Trustees, 
President, and speaker of the day. 
2:00 p.m. — Reception to alumni, sen- 
iors, and parents, by various 
schools. 
3:45 p.m. — Commencement procession, 
Form in Armory, march to Col- 
lege Avenue, thence to Pugh 
Street entrance, then to Auditor- 
ium, led by band. 
4:00 p.m. — Commencement exercises, 
Auditorium. Admission by card. 
Reading of names of candidates 
omitted. Recessional to front of 
Old Main; singing of Alma Mater; 
benediction. 
7:00 p.m. — Musical Clubs' concert. 

Auditorium. 
9:00 p.m. — President's formal reception 
at University Club to alumni, 
seniors, juniors, guests and fac- 
ulty. 
10:00 p.m. to 2:00 a.m. — Formal Com- 
mencement dance, Armory. 
Tuesday, June 16 
2:00 p.m. — Election of Trustees: Del- 
egates in Old Chapel; Alumni in 
Room 180, Old Main. 



CALENDAR 

TUESDAY, February 24 
Liberal Arts lecture, 7:00, Old Chapel. 
WEDNESDAY, February 25 

Basketball, Penn State vs. Syracuse, 
.":00, Armory. 

FRIDAY, February 27 
Penn State Players, 8:15, Auditorium 
SATURDAY, February 28 

Athletic program: Basketball, Penn 
State freshmen vs. Syracuse freshmen, 
2:00; wrestling, Penn State vs. Syra- 
cuse, 3:30; boxing, Penn State vs. V. 
M. I., 8:00. 

Flonzaley Quartet, entertainment 
course number — postponed. 

SUNDAY, March 1 

Chapel Speaker — Bishop John G. 
Ward, D.D., of Erie, Pa. 

MONDAY, March 2 

Agricultural discussion, 8:00, Univer- 
sity Club. 

CONCERT IS OFF 

The Flonzaley Quartet concert sched- 
uled for Saturday night of this week 
has been postponed due to the illness 
of one of the artists. 

LIBERAL ARTS LECTURE 

Professor G. R. Green will be the 
speaker tonight (Tuesday) in the mon- 
thly lecture of the Liberal Arts 
course. He will give an illustrated 
talk on 'Animals in Winter," starting 
at 7:00 in Old Chapel. 

o 

ASKED TO REGISTER 

The Registrar is in receipt of a com- 
munication from the American Council 
on Education at Washington, D. C, re- 
questing all faculty members to register 
with it. Registration costs nothing, 
supplies the Council with Important in- 
formation, and has already helped many 
college instructors to And professional 
promotion. The Council is -supported 
by the colleges of the country, and is 
endorsed by the Bureau of Recommen- 
dations of this college. 

At the request of the Council, the 
Registrar is mailing its registration 
forms to those not already registered. 



PENN STATE PLAYERS 

Tickets for "The Whole Town's 
Talking" will be on sale all this week 
at the State Shirt Shop. The popular 
farce is to be given in the Auditorium 
on Friday evening, February 27, at 
8:15 by the Penn State Players, under 
the direction of D. D. Mason. Tickets 
are fifty and seventy-five cents and 
they will also be on sale at the box 
office on the night of the performance. 



E.W. RUNKLE , 

2 1 L IBEF.AL ARTS 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be a< 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday 



VOLUME 4 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



STUDENTS DROPPED 

The following students have been 
hopped from college under the fifty per 
;ent rule: 



3 
2 
2 
4 
1 
3 
4 
3 
4 
2 
2 
4 
4 
4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
4 
4 
4 
4 

4 
3 
3 
4 
3 
4 
4 
4 
4 
3 
4 
4 
4 
4 
2 
4 
2 
3 
3 
3 
4 
4 
2 
A 
2 
2 
3 
2 
-4 
4 
3 
3 
4 
4 
4 
3 
A 
4 
3 
4 
3 
4 
4 



-- 



Anderson, C. W., PL 
Arm, D. L., IE 
Aylward, J. W., CF 
Backus, E. D., ME 
Balr, J. L., CF 
Baltz, A. A., EE 
Bard, R. K., CE 
Beier, E. W., EE 
Berkebile, C. D., AE 
Bernstein, I. L., CF 
B'umenfeld, S. R., CF 
Boal, C. J., PL 
Bowman, J. B., Ag 
Breed, W. E., Ag 
Breisch, E. D., PM 
Erumfield, G. E., ChE 
Bunn, L. J., ChE 
Burtt, V. T., CE 
Carson, Abe, CF 
Chenoweth, I. E., IE 
Chylack, P. T., PL 
Clarke, D. P., ME 
Clayton, B. S., CF 
Clokey, J. D„ Jr.; AL 
Cole, H. S., Ag 
Dickson, J. E., ME 
Doolin, T. J., PM 
Dubbs, J. S., PM 
Eakins, D. S., FF 
Euwer, G. A, NS 1 
Feldman, W. E., Ed 
Fithian, H. R., AL 
Glasgow, L. C, A 
Gordon, C. W., IE 
Gourley, W. C, LArch 
Gracey, J. C, AgEc 
Graham, J. M., IE 
Graham, R. W., CF 
Haeseler, W. H., ME 
Halbert, Wilbar, CF 
Hartz, C. L., CE 
Hays, R. M., LArch 
Herr, E. F., Arch 
Horner, D. B., CE 
Hufman, G. W., EchE 
Jenkins, D. E., EE 
Jones, N. B., Ag 
Kahan, B. B., Mng 
Kilpatrick, F. C, Geol 
Knappenberger, J P., IE 
Knoch, H. M., Ch 
Kulp, C. H, AH 
Lee, K. Q., AL 
Lilley, J. K., IE 
Locke, D. D„ ChE 
Long, J. C, FF 
McGrath, E. J., AL 
MaLinn, S. N. AgEc 
Markle, W. D., CE 
Martin, E. E., Ag 
Meek, G. C, CF 
Miller, C. W., FF 
Miller, E. L.. ME 
Minster, C. H., 3>H 
Mover, T. R., ChA 
Munhall, A. C, LA 
Munhall, S. T., CF 
Navarra, A. A., Ed 
Nolf, H. W., Ag 



State College, Pa., March 3, 1925 



NUMBER 22 



3 


Morris, F. B., LA 




4 


O'Connor, E. C, Arch 




4 


Peek, E. M., Jr.. CF 




4 


Pocusa, A. M., CE 




4 


Powis, R. T.. PL 




4 


Rambo. C. B., CE 




4 


Regan. J. F.. LArch 




4 


Ro=enfeld. D. A.. LA 




g 


Boss, R. C, ME 




4 


Rossiter, Elwond. FF 




1 


Buss. J. E.. Ed 




3 


Sandoe, D. L., Ag 




4 


Schaeffer, E. A, ME 




3 


Kehanehe, F. K., PL 




4 


Schell, J. T., CE 




4 


Schwartz, C. B.. PL 




4 


Shirk, H. H., FF 




4 


Streicker, R. M., PL 




3 


Stuckeman, Howard, Ag 




3 


Sutphen, R. B., CF 




4 


Sznyter, E. F., Ag 




4 


Taylor, A. P., M1E 




2 


Tompkins, C. D., LA *"~ 




2 


Tyson, D. C, Hrt 




3 


Vance, J. H., LA 




4 


Waite, W. A., CF 




3 


Wallace, T. W., OF 




3 


Waterbury, K. B., Ch 




?, 


"Williams, N. H., Mng 




?, 


Williams, W. E.. ChE 




:i 


Wills, J. H., CF 




l 


Zook. R. M„ EE 




The 


following students have 


been 


dropped for continued poor s< 


holar- 


ship: 






3 


Althouse, H. L., EE 




a 


Homan. F. F.. AEd 




3 


Rowland. T. M., EchE 




3 


Sensenich. C. G„ IE 




■; 


Wachsmuth, C. F., ME 





CALENDAR 



STUDENTS RE-INSTATED 

The following dropped students have 
been:,, re-instated: , 
■ 4 Chenoweth, I. E.. IE 
3 Glasgow, L. C, A 
2 Graham, R. W., CF 
.: ■'■■;■■ 3, Williams, W. E., Cer 



GLEE CLUB CONTEST 

Director R. W. Grant will take the 
Glee Club to New York this week for 
the annual intercqllagiate glee club 
contest to be held in Carnegie Hall on 
Saturday evening, March 7. The con- 
test will be broadcast by radio station 
WEAF of New York. Prior to the 
contest, the Glee Club will appear in 
concert at Pottstown, West Chester, 
and Abington. 



SCIENTIST TO SPEAK 

Dr. Graham Lusk, noted physiologist, 
will speak on "Problems in Metabol- 
ism" in the amphitheatre of the Chem- 
istry Annex tonight (Tuesday), at 7:30, 
under the auspices of the State Col- 
lege section of the American Chemical 
Society and the local branch of the 
American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science. Members of the fac- 
ulty and the public are invited to at- 
tend. 



TUESDAY, March 3 

Lecture by Dr. Lusk, Chemistry An- 
nex, 7:30. 

SATURDAY, March 7 

Athletic events — Freshmen vs. Le- 
high freshmen, wrestling, 2:30; varsity 
vs. Bucknell. basketball, 7:00; freshmen 
vs. California Normal, basketball, 8:00. 
SUNDAY, March 8 

Chapel Speaker — Dr. Paul S. Lein- 
bach. Editor of the Reformed Church 
Messenger, Philadelphia. 



SERIES OF LECTURES 

A series of gas lectures of special in- 
terest to chemists, chemical engineers, 
metallurgists, ceramists, and mechan- 
ical engineers is being given this week 
in the Old Mining Building at 4:30. 
The first lecture was given yesterday, 
and others are scheduled for Tuesday. 
Wednesday, and Thursday. The sub- 
jects and speakers are: "Carburetted 
Water Gas," by Professor J. J. Mor- 
gan, Columbia University; "Production 
and Cost Analysis." by L. R. Dutton. 
general manager of the Philadelphia 
Suburban Gas and Electric Company; 
aild "Industrial Applications of Gas." 
by .T. J. Quinn, vice-president of the 
Quinoy Gas Company, Boston. 



SCHOLARSHIP DAY 

The attention of deans, heads of de- 
partments, and faculty members con- 
nected with honor societies is called 
to the fact that Scholarship Day will 
be observed on Tuesday. April 21. 

In order to eliminate the last minute 
rush in the arrangement and publica- 
tion of the program, experienced in the 
past, it is requested that honor society 
elections be held prior to April first, 
if possible. This will allow the- Com- 
mittee on Academic Standards ample 
time to attend to all of the details well 
in advance of April 21. — R. Adams 
Dutcher, Chairman. 



TO SHOW INTERESTING FILMS 

Under the auspices of the Block and 
Bridle Club of the Animal Husbandry 
department, three films of general in- 
terest to the faculty will be shown in 
Old Chapel on Wednesday evening, 
March 4. at 7:00. They are entitled: 
"Behind the Breakfast Plate;" "The 
Horse in Motion:" and "Suppressing 
Foot and Mouth Disease." 



FELLOWSHIPS 

The office of the dean of the Graduate 
School receives numerous announce- 
ments of graduate fellowships and as- 
sistantships in various colleges and 
universities. Members of the instruc- 
tional staff who are interested should 
refer to the bulletin board in the Botany 
Building, where many of these notices 
are posted. 



E.W.RUNKLE. 

2 1 L ! B L K A L ARTS 



Published every Tuesday 
uring the college year as a 
leans of making official an- 
ouncements and presenting 
ems of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor. 175 Main (Building, not lat- 
er thin 11 . -i. m. each Saturday. 



OLUME 4 



State College, Pa., March 10, 1925 



NUMBER 23 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



STUDENT WITHDRAWS 

During the past week, the following 
udent has withdrawn from college: 
4 Layton, C. M. F AgEd. 



STUDENT DROPPED 

The following student has been drop- 
:d under the fifty per cent rule: 
4 Mease, C. L., ME. 



STUDENTS RE-INSTATED 

The following dropped students have 
ien re-instated: 

3 Brumifield, G. E., Probation 
3 Rowland, T. M., NiS. 



SENIOR RE-EXAMS 

At the request of the Council of Ad- 
inistration the office of the Registrar 
ill prepare a schedule of re-examin- 
sns for all seniors graduating in June, 
lasmuch as this request was made last 
onday, the schedule will not be avail- 
tie for albout two weeks. Department 
isads who have already scheduled such 
j:aminations should inform Mr. Bull- 
iger of the time and place selected. — 
['. S. Hoffman. 

BIBLE READINGS 

President Thomas and Professor Es- 
rnshade have recently received ad- 
!nce copies of "Bible Readings for 
'hools and Colleges," a volume for 
ihich they are joint editors. The book 
1 bound in flexible fabricoid and is 
jiblished by The Macmillan Company. 
;ie readings are taken from both the 
id and the New Testament and from 
e Apocrypha. The text follows that 
| the Authorized Version but the par- 
','raphing and punctuation have been 
lodernized. 

Two hundred and twenty-one care- 
illy selected readings are given, rarely 
J:eeedlng a page and a half in length. 
Iich is given an appropriate descrip- 
ve title, together with the textual re- 
irence. An excellent index makes the 
lection of readings for special oc- 
;.sions very easy. The large clear 
;pe and high grade of paper used 
jake it especially adapted to its pur- 
,)se and do not detract from its value 
j the general reader. 



COL. SHOEMAKER TO SPEAK 

Colonel Henry W. 'Shoemaker will 
>eak in the Old Chapel on Friday eve- 
ng, March 13, at 7:30 under the au- 
toes of the Penn State Outing Club. 
is subject will be "Wild Life, Past 
id Present, in the State College Re- 
on." Members of the faculty and the 
meral public are invited. 
There will be an informal meeting 
the University Club following the 
sture, when members of the faculty 
n meet Ool Shoemaker. 



SCHOLARSHIP CARDS 

In an effort to improve the scholas- 
tic standing of fraternity members, the 
two fraternity councils last fall ap- 
pointed a joint committee on schol- 
arship. Mr. Leon Todd, chairman of 
this committee, has made the following 
statement with regard to the value of 
the fraternity scholarship reports which 
instructors are requested to make 
monthly: 

"The scholarship cards are consider- 
ed to be of great value. Several of the 
fraternity chapters use 'the grades ob- 
tained from these reports for making 
progress charts displayed on their 
bulletin boards. The name of the 
course, the student, and his standing 
are thus made known to the entire 
membership. They find this is an ex- 
cellent stimulus to the members to 
work for better grades. 

"Many of the chapters use these 
cards for checking up on those under- 
classmen who are 'below grade in any 
subjects. If a member happens to be 
below grade he is prohibited from going 
out of the house after 7:30 p. m. They 
are also used in some houses as a check 
for determining eligibility of pledges 
Cor initiation. 

"The entire fraternity group will ap- 
preciate prompt attention to these cards 
by 'the instructors. The committee on 
scholarship also wishes to take this 
opportunity of thanking the instructors 
for the help given in the past." 

I wish to second the request of this 
comimiRee for prompt attention to 
these reports, because in my opinion 
most chapters are using the reports 
profitably. — A. R. Warnock, dean of 
men. 



CALENDAR 



THE COLLEGE BOND ISSUE 

The $8,000,000 bond issue resolu- 
tion passed third and final reading 
in the Senate last week without a dis- 
senting vote, and now goes to the 
House for concurrence. The enabling 
act to make the bond issue available 
if passed at the next general election 
is to be introduced this week. It is 
also expected that the appropriation 
bill will be reported in the House this 
week. 



DRIVING TO HARRISBURG 

Members of the faculty who are con- 
templating driving to Harrisburg and 
other eastern points are advised that 
the bridge between Reedsville and 
Lewistown is down. Instead of a long 
detour via Water Street, the route 
through Millheim and Lewisburg is 
probably best under the circumstances. 



AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY 

There will be a business meeting of 
the State College section of the Amer- 
ican Chemical Society on Wednesday 
evening, March 11, at 7:30, in Room 
9, Chemistry Annex. 



TUESDAY, Marcli 10 

Girls' Glee Club concert, 8:15, Audi- 
torium. 

THURSDAY, March 12 
Faculty Chess Club, 7:30, University 
Club. 

SATURDAY, March 14 
Athletic events — Penn State vs. Penn, 
boxing, 2:30; Brooklyn Polytech, wrest- 
ling, 7:00. 

SUNDAY, March 15 
(Chapel Speaker — Dr. J. A. W- Haas, 
President of Muhlenberg College, Allen- 
town, Pa. 

ENGINEERING GRADUATES 

The value to Pennsylvania of the 
- ineering training given by Penn 
State is estimated at $2,000,000 a year, 
based on the increased earning power 
l the 2000 engineering graduates com- 
pared to technical workers with only a 
high school education. This interesting 
estimate has been made by Dean Saek- 
ett following a thorough survey of the 
situation. 

Replies to a questionnaire sent out 
by Dean Sackett indicate the average 
salary of the graduate after an aver- 
age period of 7.6 years since graduation 
io be $2000 a year higher than that of 
the ordinary technical worker after a 
corresponding length of time. 

It was ailso found that 95 per cent 
of recent graduating classes locate in 
positions within the bounds of the 
state, and that 60 per cent of all Penn 
State engineering graduates are locat- 
ed in Pennsylvania. Reports from 800 
of the 2400 graduates of the Engineer- 
ing school show that from 90 to 95 

t ' cent are still engaged in engineer- 
ing work, whereas many colleges And 
that only 50 per cent or less of engi- 
neering graduates stick to the profes- 
sion. 



NEW A. H. SCHOLARSHIP 

Professor Tomhave, head of the De- 
partment of Animal Husbandry, has 
recently received word that a scholar- 
ship of $250.00, offered by the Pullman 
Company of Chicago, has been award- 
ed to Penn State as a result of cash 
premiums won in the open classes of 
live stock at the last International Live 
.Stock Exposition. Twenty of these 
scholarships are to be offered each year. 
The fund will be administered by a 
board of trustees appointed by the di- 
rectors of the International Live Stock 
Exposition. The scholarship will be 
awarded to a needy student in Animal 
Husbandry. 



DR. PATTEE CONTRIBUTES 

Dr. F. L. Pattee has contributed an 
article on James Fenimore Cooper to 
the March issue of The American Mer- 
cury. 



E . W . R U N K L E . 

21 LIBERAL ARTS 



Published every Tuesday 
iring the college year as a 
eans of making official an- 
mncements and presenting 
jms of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor. 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



DLUME 4 



State College, Pa., March 17, 1925 



NUMBER 24 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



COLLEGE SENATE 

The regular meeting of the College 
nate will take place on Thursday eve- 
ag, March 19, at 7:30, in the Foyer 
the Auditorium. 



AGRICULTURAL FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the fac- 
ty of the School of Agriculture at 
30 on Thursday, March 19, in Room 
6 Agricultural building. — R. L. Watts, 
an. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 

idents have left college: 
4 Brown, R. O., ME 
2 Hamilton, R. T., OF 
2 Shinn, C. M., IE 



SENIOR RE -EXAMS 

die schedule of senior re-examina- 
ns for the first semester will be mail- 
to department heads this week. 
;ads of departments are requested to 
:ike this announcement to all seniors 
fl second year two-year agricultural 
idents.— C. E. Bullinger. 



FINAL EXAMINATIONS 

The final examination schedule for 
i second semester will be mailed to 
, department heads during the coming 
ek. If any department head fails 
, receive his copy he should notify 
is Scheduling Officer. — C. E. Bulling- 



UNIVERSITY CLUB 

Ladies' Night dinner and dance will 
i held at the University Club on Fri- 
jy evening, March 20, starting at 6:30. 
jnner reservations must be made with 
je steward by Wednesday noon. On 
jturday evening, at 8:00, members 
Id their guests will be entertained by 
|e Penn State Players in one-act 
ays. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERS 

All members of the Mechanical En- 
tering faculty are asked to meet 
1 tside the M. E. Laboratory at 3:30 
| Friday, March 20, for the depart- 
bntaJ picture. They should also noti- 
| students in their sections 



TO DEBATE CHILD LABOR 

Student members of the Penn State 
ange will debate the Child Labor 
jiendment at a meeting open to the 
plic tonight (Tuesday) at 8:15 in 
°m 100, Horticultural building. An 
Pence decision will be asked. Hem- 
's of the faculty are invited. 



CHANGES IN COURSE 

The following table shows the num- 
ber -of .(Students who changed their 
course at the opening of the second 
semester: 

From. To 
Agriculture: 

Two-year course 1 

Agriculture 2 1 

Agr. Biochem 1 6 

Agr. Econ 4 

Agronomy 1 

Animal Husbandry 3 

Botany 2 

Dairy Husbandry 2 2 

Farm Forestry 1 

Landscape Arch 2 

Total 14 14 

Chemistry & Physics: 

Chemistry 4 1 

iChem. Engineering 6 

Natural Science 3 3 

Physics 1 

Pre-Medical 11 4 

Total 24 9 

Education: 

Arts & Sci Ed. 6 16 

Agricultural Ed 1 3 

Industrial Ed 1 2 

Total g 21 

Engineering-: 

Architecture 1 

Arch. Eng 1 

Civil Engineering 7 2 

Electrical Eng 11 1 

Electrochem Eng 4 

Industrial Eng S 1 

Mechanical Eng 2 

Total 32 6 

Liberal Arts: 

Arts and Letters 8 24 

Commerce & Finance — 6 18 

Pre-Legal 1 5 

Total 15 47 

Mines and Metallurgy: 

Ceramics 3 

Metallurgy 4 

Mining Engineering 3 1 

Mining Geology 2 

Total _ 5 8 

Probation Section 16 9 

Grand Total 114 114 

o 

LEWISTOWN ROUTE OPEN 

Due largely to the efforts of Repre- 
sentative J. L. Holmes, the State High- 
way Department has hastened the con- 
struction of a temporary bridge be- 
tween Lewistown and Reedsville, and 
the road to Lewistown is now open. 

"j 

HONORED WITH OFFICE 

Professor R. U. Blasingame has re- 
cently been appointed chairman of the 
Committee on Farm Machinery of the 
American Society of Agricultural En- 
gineers. 



CALENDAR 



TUESDAY, March 17 

School of Education faculty meeting, 
4:30, Room K in Library. 

THURSDAY, March 19 
Agricultural Faculty, 3:30, Room 
206 Ag. 

Dr. Kilpatrick lectures, Old Chapel, 
4:30 and 8:00. 

College Senate, 7:30, Foyer of Audi- 
torium. 

FRIDAY, March 20 
Ladies Night at University Club, 6:30. 

SATURDAY, March 21 
Penn State Players at University 
Club, 8:00. 

SUNDAY, March 22 
Chapel Speaker — Dr. W. Warren 
Giles, First Reformed Church, East Or- 
ange, N. J. 

DR. KILPATRICK COMING 

Members of the faculty are exceed- 
ingly fortunate in having opportunity 
to hear Dr. William H. Kilpatrick. of 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 
who is to give two lectures in Old 
Chapel on Thursday, March 19, at 4:30 
and 8:00 p. m. In the afternoon he will 
speak on 'How Learning Takes Place," 
and in the evening on "Some Applica- 
tions of the First Subject to College 
Teaching." 

Dr. Kilpatrick is considered one of 
the great master teachers of this coun- 
try. His engagement to give these lec- 
tures was suggested by President 
Thomas and the Council of Administra- 
tion, and a full attendance of the fac- 
ulty is urged. 



FRENCH LECTURE 

"A Trip from New York to Paris" is 
the title of an illustrated lecture to be 
delivered in French by Mr. Albert Ro- 
bin on Wednesday evening, March IS, 
at 7:30 in Old Chapel under the au- 
spices of the French Club. There Will 
also be a musical program. A cordial 
invitation is extended to all members 
of the faculty. 

— — — — o— 

PROF. FERGUSON HONORED 

Professor J. A. Ferguson has been 
elected chairman of the AHengheny Sec- 
tion of the Society of American For- 
esters. This section includes over 100 
foresters from the states of New Jer- 
sey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, 
and West Virginia. 

o 

PUZZLES THE CLASS 
The attention of the Editor of the 
Bulletin has been called to a new use 
for the well-known Cross Word Puzzle. 
A special "Highway Cross Word Puz- 
zle" is now being used by Professor J. 
E. Kaulfuss in connection with his 
classes in highway subjects. 



£ -*-^;; 



A L £ 
■'■■ 



■ 2 B[.p , . 

**?8 












■ 















Published every Tuesday 
luring the college year as a 
neans of making official an- 
louncements and presenting 
terns of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each (Saturday. 



OLUME 4 



State College, Pa., March 24, 1925 



NUMBER 25 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

EASTER RECESS CHANGED 

At its meeting las I' week the College 
Senate voted to extend the Easter re- 
ess as follows: To begin on Thursday, 
Ipril 9, at 12:10 p.m., and to end on 
Tuesday, April 14, at 12:00 noon. 



BELOW GRADE REPORTS 

The attention of all members of the 
eaching staff is called to the fact that 
elow grades for the eight-week per- 
Dd are due at the offices of the various 
eans on Monday, April 6. — W. S. Hol'f- 
nan, Registrar. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
tudents have left college: 

2 Booth, H. W., ME 

3 Golem, J. B., AL 

4 Irwin, L. W., CF 

2 Loscalzo, D. A., Mug 

4 Whitehouse, C. H., CE 

3 Young, W. A., AL 

PRESIDENT THOMAS RETURNS 

President Thomas will return to his 
Bee on Wednesday following several 
eeks spent in Florida recuperating 
•om his recent illness. On the re- 
irn journey he stopped off in Harris- 
irg Monday evening in the interest 
Penn State. 



"CHILDREN OF THE MOON" 

As their anniversary produc :ion, the 
enn State Players, under the direc- 
on of Professor A. C. Cloethigh, will 
age "Children of the Moon" on Fri- 
iy, April 3, in the Auditorium. This 
ay by Martin Flavin is not a. sombre 
agedy but a gripping story full of 
irilling situations. Critics have hail- 
1 it as one of the best of American 
ays. 

Tickets are now on sale at the State 
lirt Shop at the papular prices of 
'ty and seventy-five cents. 



WANT TO RENT HOUSES 

The Summer Session office has al- 
■ady received several requests from 
isiting instructors desiring to rent 
Duees or apartments for the coming 
unmer Session. Faculty members 
ho will have such accommodations 
mailable are asked to inform the Sum- 
er Session office as soon as possible. 



LIBERAL ARTS LECTURE 

The third lecture in the Liberal Arts 
Ties is scheduled for next Tuesday 
'ening, March 31, at 7:00 in Old 
lapei. Dean G. L. Wendt will be the 
'eaker, with an illustrated talk on the 
ibject "What is the World Made of?" 



STATE SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Registrar recently received from 
Dr. C. D. Koch, director of Profession- 
al Education of the Department of Pub- 
lic Instruction in Harrisburg, a report 
concerning the scholarships awarded, 
toy examination, by the department. 
State scholarships are awarded annual- 
ly, one to each county except in those 
counties which contain more than one 
entire senatorial district, in which case 
one scholarship is awarded for each 
district. The following three counties, 
therefore, receive more than one, as 
follows: Allegheny 6, Luzerne 2, and 
Philadelphia 8. 

The number of scholarships available 
each year is 80. These state scholar- 
ships were first awarded in 1919, at 
which time 88 high schools reported a 
total of 205 candidates. In 1924, 341 
high schools reported 1348 candidates, 
and over 4000 examination papers were 
graded by the department. During the 
years 1919-1924 inclusive, 435 scholar- 
ships have been awarded. 

Penn State, with 83 scholarship hold- 
ers enrolled during this period, leads 
the colleges of the State. The Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania ranks second with 
55, and the University of Pittsburgh 
and Carnegie Tech are tied for third 
place with 23 each. Holders of the 
scholarships have attended 36 Penn- 
sylvania colleges. 

Each scholarship entitles the holder 
to the sum of $100.00 annually, provid- 
ed that he is a student in good stand- 
ing at any of the colleges of this state. 
The total amount expended during the 
five year p«riod was $91,180. 

At the present time 48 Penn State 
students hold state scholarships. They 
come from 33 counties. Centre, Colum- 
bia, and Wyoming cowities are repre- 
sented by three each. Bradford, Cam- 
eron, Clearfield, Elk, Lmerne, Susque- 
hanna, and Wayne have two each. 
Twenty-two counties, including Alle- 
gheny and Philadelphia, are represent- 
ed by one each. 



CALENDAR 



-0- 



LIVE STOCK SHOW 

Students in the Animal Husbandry 
department will hold their annual live 
stock fitting and showing contest in 
the stock pavilion on Saturday after- 
noon, March 28. This will afford mem- 
bers of the faculty and students an 
opportunity to see some of the work 
done in the department and also some 
of the best live stock owned by the 
college. 



ATTENDS MUSIC CONFERENCE 

Director R. W. Grant, of the Depart, 
ment of Music, last week attended the 
eighth annual conference of Eastern 
Music Supervisors at New Haven, Con- 
necticut. During the past year, Di- 
rector Grant has served as president 
of this organization which numbers 
about 600 memtoers from the eastern 
seaboard states. 



THURSDAY, March 26 

Faculty chess club, 7:30, University 
Club. 

SUNDAY, March 29 

Chapel Speaker — Dr. Francis Shunk 
Downs, First Presbyterian Church, Ty- 
rcne, Pa. 

TUESDAY, March 31 

Liberal Arts lecture, 7:00, Old Chapel. 



SPARKS MEMORIAL CAMPAIGN 

Under the direction of Messrs. B. 
M. Hermann and W. G. Killinger, the 
faculty campaign in behalf of the 
Sparks Memorial Will toe launched this 
week. The co-operation of all heads 
of departments is being asked by those 
in charge of the faculty drive and each 
department head will be asked to se- 
cure contributions from those mem- 
bers of his department who wish to 
participate in, the memorial. Many 
faculty members have already signi- 
fied their interest in the campaign and 
it is hoped that the faculty participa- 
tion will be as unanimous as has been 
the response among the students. 

o 

DISCARDED CLOTHING 

The chaplain of the Rockview Peni- 
tentiary has made an appeal for maga- 
zines, phonograph records and dis- 
carded clothing for the prisoners. The 
Menorah Society and the Y. M. C. A. 
are acting as a clearing agency for any 
of these articles which may be offered 
bj faculty, townspeople and students. 
The articles will be called for if word 
is left at the "Y" Hut. 



ADVANCED STANDING STUDENTS 

Twenty students were admitted with 
advanced standing at the beginning of 
the second semester, according to a 
report just- announced by Dr. Mar- 
quardt, College Examiner. They are 
classified as follows: Juniors 2, Sopho- 
mores 10, and Freshmen 8. 

They came from the following in- 
stitutions: University of Pennsylvan- 
ia 3; Columhia University 2; Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh 2; and the fol- 
lowing universities and colleges one 
each: East Stroudsburg Normal, 
Franklin and Marshall College, Har- 
vard University, Iowa State College, 
Juniata College, University of Minne- 
sota, New York University, Ohio Uni- 
versity, Oxford College, Pennsylvania 
Forestry School, Schuylkill College, 
Temple University, and Washington 
State College. 

Adding the 20 advanced) standing 
students admitted for the second sem- 
ester to the 134 who entered first sem- 
ester, gives a total of 154 students ad- 
mitted with advanced standing for the 
present college year. 



E.W.RUNKLE. 



Published every Tuesday 
during the college year as a 
means of making official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
items of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 



VOLUME 4 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Due to the delay In fixing the esti- 
mated enrollment for next year, the 
scheduling material requested by the 
Scheduling Officer will not be due' until 
further notice.— C. E. Bullinger. 
o 

DIRECTORY SUPPLEMENTS 

The supplement to the Student and 
Faculty Directory has been mailed to 
>ach member of the teaching force. 
Anyone who has not received his copy 
nay obtain one by calling at the office 
j)f the Registrar.— W. S. Hoffman. 

o 

COUNCIL ACTION 

At a special meeting of the Council 
jrf Administration last week, it was 
I'cted to recommend to the College 
|!enate that a "Freshman Week" be 
ield at the College prior to the opening 
! >f the first semester next September. 



AGRICULTURAL DISCUSSION 

j The next meeting of the research 
|taff of the Agricultural Experiment 
iltation and the Institute of Animal 
[Tutrition will be held at the University 
I'lub on Monday evening, April 6. at 
j:00. Professor C. F. Noll will dis- 
•uss "Better Utilization of the College 
I'arm for Experiment Station Studies," 
iL-hile Professor F. D. Gardner will 
resent a "Suggested Research Program 
br the Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
'on." General discussion will follow 
'iie presentation of these subjects, 
'isitors are welcome. 



E N T E RT AI N M E N T CO U RS E 

The sixth number of the Y. M. C. A. 
btertainment course is scheduled for 
aturday evening, April 4, art 8:15 in 
be Auditorium. Stephen Leacock, 
.nown as the ".Mark Twain of Canada," 
fill be the attraction, and his keen wit 
iromises- an interesting evening for 
pose who attend. Tickets may be ob- 
liined at the "Y" Hut. 

o 

iOWEST THIRDERS LEAD 

AMONG STUDENTS DROPPED 

I For the past seven years, the Regis- 
Kir's office has asked high school prin- 
cipals to indicate on the application 
jlank of a prospective student the 
•dative rank, according to thirds, of 
1 he applicant in his graduating class. 
he selection of the freshman class is 
'Med partly upon this ranking. If 
lie number of "upper thirders" is less 
[tan the quota to be accepted for a 
; ven curriculum, the second or middle 
"oup is considered, and if this group 
i exhausted before the quota is filled, 
jiose who were graduated in the lowest 
j ird are considered. 
Considerable objection has been raised 
! this method especially in the case 
those students who come from the 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



State College, Pa., March 31, 1925 



NUMBER 26 



larger centers, the contention being 
that the "lowest thirder" from a large 
city school is better prepared than the 
"highest thirder" from the smaller 
rural community. 

According to an analysis of persons 
dropped for poor scholarship recently 
completed by Professor W. S. Hoffman, 
the practice of basing the selection of 
applicants upon their relative high 
school rank is justified. The 101 per- 
sons dropped under the fifty per cent 
rule at the end of the first semester, 
as published in the Bulletin for March 
3, 1925, are divided as follows: 

Highest thirders 16 

Middle thirders 33 

Lowest thirders 3G 

'Not classified by Principal .. 16 

Total 101 

In all probability the majority of 
those students whose classification was 
not given were graduated in the lowest 
third and the information was with- 
held by the principal, who perhaps 
feared that it would interfere with the 
applicant's chances of securing admis- 
sion v 

Of the 101 dropped, 82 were listed as 
freshmen and sophomore?. Those grad- 
uated in the lowest third comprise 
the largest group dropped from the 
freshman class — 26, or more than half 
of the freshmen who were dropped. 
Iu the sophomore class, however, the 
number dropped from the group that 
had been graduated in the middle 
third is the largest — 15. This is due to 
the fact that the lowest thirders are 
the smallest group admitted and that 
their ranks have already been decimat- 
ed during the freshman year. 

The above statistics seem to indi- 
cate that the' gest risks are to be 
selected from the group graduated in 
the upper third of their high school 
classes, and that those graduated in 
the middle and lowest thirds are less 
desirable. 

As to the relative standing of the 
applicants from city and country high 
schools, the following statistics are of 
interest: Of the 26 freshmen dropped 
from college who had been graduated 
in the lowest third of their high school 
class, 23 came from Pennsylvania 
high schools. Thirteen were graduates 
of high schools' located in towns with 
a population of 5000 or more, while ten 
were from towns of less than 5000. If 
the division is made on the basis of 
the census definition of urban and rur- 
a' population — more than 2500 or less 
than 2500 — nineteen came from urban 
high schools and four from rural high 
schools. 

In percentage, this gives 82.6 per cent 
from urban districts and 17.4 per cent 
from rural districts. Since the total 
enrollment of students in this ,polIe 
based on the same division, 0fct63.1 
cent urban and 36.9 per cenF^rural, ft 
will be seen that a greater proportion 
of the dropped lower thirders S(me 
from the city schools. \ 



CALENDAR 



TUESDAY, March 81 

Liberal Arts lecture, Dean Wendt, 
7:00, Old Chapel. 

FRIDAY, April 3 
Penn State Players, 8:15, Auditorium. 
SATURDAY, April 4 

Entertainment course, Stephen Lea- 
cock, S:15, Auditorium. 

SUNDAY, April 5 

No chapel speaker. There will be 
a musical program. 

MONDAY, April 6 

Agricultural discussion, 8:00, Univer- 
sity Club. 

PENN STATE PLAYERS 

Faculty members who desire to see 
a gripping American play, full of 
thrilling situations, are advised to at- 
tend the anniversary performance of 
the Penn State Players on Friday 
evening, April 3, at 8:15 in the Audi- 
torium. "Children of 'the Moon," by- 
Martin Flavin, is the play that has 
been selected for this feature perform- 
ance of the year. Directed by Profes- 
sor A. C. Cloetingh, this production is 
said to be on a par with the best pre- 
vious efforts of the Players. 

Tickets are on sale at the State 
Shirt Shop or may be obtained at the 
box office on the night of the perform- 
ance. Prices, 50 and 75 cents. 



BOND ISSUE PASSES 

For the second time, the, $8,000,000 
bond issue resolution for new buildings 
and their equipment at Penn State has 
been passed by the Legislature. Final 
passage by unanimous vote took place 
in the House last Tuesday, the reso- 
lution having previously passed thte 
Senate as well at the Legislature of 
1923. It is now np to the people, but 
just when it can be voted upon has 
not yet been determined. It is possible 
that such action can be taken next 
November. The resolution if passed 
as an amendment to the Constitution. 
will allow the College $1,000,000 a year 
for eight years. 

The college appropriation bill wais 
passed by the Senate last week, call- 
ing for $2,993,914 and it will probably 
be acted upon by the House this week. 
It. should be noted that this amount is 
exactly the figure recommended by the 
Council of Education two years ago 
and passed by the Legislature of 1923. 
It is approximately $700,000 more than 
was provided in the Governor's budget. 

o 

TRUSTEES TO MEET 

The Executive Committee of the 
Board of Trustees is scheduled to meet 
at the College on Friday evening, 
April 3, at seven-thirty. 



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Published every Tuesday 
uring the college year as a 
leans of making official an- 
ouncements and presenting 
.ems of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 



Contributions must be as 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



OLUME 4 



State College, Pa., April 7, 1925 



NUMBER 27 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



COLLEGE SENATE 

The regular meeting of the College 
enate will be held on Thursday eve- 
ing, April 16, at 7:30 in the Foyer of 
ie Auditorium. 



o 

AGRICULTURAL FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the fac- 
Ity of the School of Agriculture on 
hursday, April 16, at 4:30, in Room 
(6 Agricultural Building. — R. L. Watts, 
;an. 

o 

ENGINEERING FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the fac- 
jlty of the School of Engineering on 
jlonday, April 20, at 3:30, in Room 200 
ilngineering D. — R. L. Sackett, dean. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

There will toe a meeting of the fac- 
lty of the School of Education on 
'uesday, April 14, at 4:30, in Room K 
f the Library. — H. G. Parkinson, sec- 
tary. 



CHANGE OF OFFICE 

The office of the College (Scheduling 
j'ffiicer has been changed ifco Room 474 
S'ld Main. Office hours will be as fol- 
pws: Tuesday 1:30 to 5:00, and Fri- 
ay 8:00 to 12:00.— C. E. Bullinger. 



, Duri 
tuden 

2 

4 

2 

2 

2 

4 

A 

2 

4 

4 

4 

4 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

ng the past week the following 
ts have left college: 
Bader, G. L„ AE 
Fadden, Edward, ME 
Gager, Frances H., HE 
Heckendorn, G. M., IE 
Helbig, William, AL 
McCrossin, G. M., CE 
Newweiler, P. F., 2 yr. Ag'. 
Posey, H. A., CF 
Pressn.an, R.lph, Ag - 
Snyder, R. P., LA 
Spears, Isabelle G„ Ed 
Weiss, C. H., IE 



EASTER RECESS 
j The attention of all members of the 
acuity is again called to the change 
a Easter recess period as appioved by 
,he College Senate at its last meeting, 
phe vacation will begin on Thursday, 
toril 9, at 12:10 p. m., and will end 
[n Tuesday, April 14, at 1:30 p. m. 
I Students absent without official ex- 
luse on the last day before or the first 
ay after vacation should toe barred from 
'lasses by their instructors until they 
iiave paid the five dollar fine and re- 
ceived a re-admission permit. 
j By Council of Administration action, 
nstructors are forbidden to change 
he regular schedule of classes before 
nd after vacation. In case of prac- 
icum subjects, however, where the 
>raetice is to excuse students when the 



day's assignment is completed, the 
same practice may be followed at va- 
cation periods. — A. R. Warnock, dean 
of men. 

TRANSPORTATION BUREAU 

Members of the faculty who own 
automobiles, when starting on either 
business or pleasure trips, are often 
anxious for companionship upon the 
journey. The trip is far more enjoy- 
able if there is someone to converse 
With enroute. 

There are other faculty members who 
must depend upon bus or train service 
when they travel, yet in many cases 
their destination is ithe same as that 
of the car owner who seeks a compan- 
ion for the trip. In the past there has 
been no way for these two groups of 
faculty people to get together. 

The Editor of the Bulletin has been 
asked to undertake the organization of 
a "Transportation Bureau" in the in- 
terests of these two groups and also in 
the interest of economy. An effort will 
toe made to do so, with the understand- 
ing that if the experiment proves un- 
satisfactory it will be discontinued. 

The establishment of such a service 
for the faculty will necessitate cooper- 
ation on the part of both of the inter- 
ested groups. It will be imperative 
that those planning 'trips in their cars 
notify this office as much in advance 
as possible. It will also be necessary 
for those Who would appreciate a "lift" 
to have 'their names on file in case 
there is to be a car going in their di- 
rection. 

A daily schedule of "Cars Offered" 
and "Transportation Requested" will be 
maintained in this office for at least 
a month in advance. Car owners con- 
templating trips should notify the of- 
fice of their name, destination, date of 
leaving, time of leaving, and number of 
passengers they can accommodate. 

Those desiring to ride should give 
their name, destination, and date of 
leaving. 

The information should be given by 
'telephone, calling the Department of 
Public Information, 175 Old Main. Sug- 
gestions will be welcomed. 



CALEJNDAK 



A PLAYER TRIUMPH 

The Penn State Players scored one 
oi their greatest triumphs in the Audi- 
torium last Friday night in their an- 
niversary offering of "Children of the 
Moon." Those who failed to see the 
performance missed one of the best 
dramatic efforts ever put forth in State 
College. Great credit is due to the 
Players and to their directors for the 
successful staging of so difficult a play. 

o 

TO ATTEND CONVENTION 

Professor W. S. Hoffman, registrar 
Of the college, will leave on Thursday 
to attend the thirteenth annual meeting 
of the American Association of Col- 
legiate Registrars to be held at Bould- 
er, Colorado, April 1>4 and 15. 



WEDNESDAY, April 8 

Baseball, Penn State vs. Juniata, 4:30, 
New Beaver. 

THURSDAY, April !) 
Easter recess begins, 12:10. 

SUNDAY, April 12 
No chapel. 

TUESDAY, April 14 
Easter recess ends, 1:30. 
Education faculty meeting, 4:30, 
Room K, Library. 

THURSDAY, April 16 
Agricultural faculty, 4:30, Room ivO 
Ag. 

College Senate, 7:30, Foyer. 

FRIDAY, April 17 
Ladies' Night at University Club. 

SATURDAY, April 18 
Baseball, Penn State vs. Gettysburg, 
:!:30, New Beaver. 

Spring meeting and smoker, Univer- 
sity Club. 

SUNDAY, April 1!) 
Chapel Speaker — Dr. William J. Saw- 
telie, First Presbyterian Church, Sera 
ton, Pa. 

MONDAY, April 20 

Engineering faculty meeting, 3:30, 
Room 200, Eng. D. 

SERIES OF LECTURES 
Dr Edith Hale Swift, of the Ameri- 
can Social Hygiene Association will 
give a series of lectures on April 16, 
17, and 18, to which faculty members 
and their wives are invited. Lectures 
to women students will be in Old Chap- 
el as follows: 

April 16 — 3:30 and 6:45; April 17 — 
3:30; April 18 — 11:15. The coopera- 
tion of the faculty is asked in order to 
enable girls to attend the Saturday 
morning lecture if their scholarship 
will warrant their being excused at 
that hour. 

Lectures to men students will be in 
the Auditorium as follows: April 16 — 
8:00 p.m.; and April 17—7:00 p.m. 

o 

ROUND-THE-WORLD FLIERS 

Arrangements have been completed 
to bring two of the famous "Round- 
the World Fliers" to Penn State on 
Tuesday, April 14, the day on \ hich 
the Easter vacation ends. They will 
speak at 7:30 in the Auditorium and 
in case of an overflow, will address a 
second gathering in Old Chapel about 
8:00. The talks will be illustrated with 
moving pictures. Admission is free. 

o 

NO BULLETIN NEXT WEEK 

Because of the Easter holiday period, 
there will toe no issue of the Faculty 
Bulletin under date of Tuesday, April 
14. The next issue will toe that of April 
21. 



E. W.RUNKLE, 

21 LIB £. HAL ARTS 



Published every Tuesday 
luring the college year as a 
neans of making- official an- 
nouncements and presenting 
tems of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State Coll 




VOLUME 4 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



STUDENTS' WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
tudents have left college: 

3 Eentley, H. C, iCE 

4 Richards, K. F., EE 
4 Shively, J. H., Cer 

2 Staff, Fleda L., HE 



STORAGE RESEARCH 

Action of the Executive Committee of 
tie Board -of Trustees has created in 
tie Department of Horticulture a Di- 
ision of Storage Research relating to 
be storage of fruits and vegetables, 
nip Mr. L. M. Marble, of Canton, Pa., 
ead of the divisions Professor of 
torage Research. 



CO-OPERATION asked 

1 1 should like to have the co-opera- 
on of the members of the general 
liculty in reporting to me violations 
|[: the college rule against student au- 
pmobiles. This rule is a wise one 
|nd has already justified itself. Some 
[iolations of it, however, are likely to 
[scape official notice unless the admin- 
jtrative officers receive the kind of 
[felp which I am asking for. 
1 1 should like to take this opporunity 
1: stating that I shall appreciate re- 
viving whatever definite, reliable in- 
ii'rmation faculty members may have 
plative to student drinking or im- 
toral conduct. — A. R. Warnock, Dean 
! Men. 



INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH 

At a meeting on April 3, the Execu- 
ve Committee of the Board .of Trus- 
ses voted that there be established 
'ithin the School of Chemistry and 
hysics a Division of Industrial Re- 
sarch, and that said division toe author- 
ed to undertake service for individu- 
Is or industrial corporations including 
ists of materials, advice and consulta- 
on, library and informational studies, 
ersonnel and employment advice, in- 
stigations of processes, methods and 
esigns, broad scientific researches, or 
) .perform under contract any other 
peciflc industrial service within the 
3ope of the School of (Chemistry and 
hysics, in accordance with contracts 
hich may be approved by the trustees 
■om time to time. Dean iG. L. Wendt 
as appointed director of the new di- 
ision. 



FORMER PROFESSOR DIES 

j 

i Word was received last week of the 
jidden death of Mr. R. S. Pritchard, 
jirmerly a member of the college ifac- 
I'-ty in the Department of Chemistry. 
nee leaving- Penn State, Mr. Pritch- 
I'd has been at Wake Forest College, 
; North Carolina. 



Contributions must be &» 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



State College, Pa., April 21, 1925 



NUMBER 28 



SCHOLARSHIP DAY 

All college classes will be dismissed 
during the last two periods on Tuesday 
morning, April 21, in order that stu- 
dents and faculty may attend the 
Scholarship Day exercises in the Audi- 
torium at 10:30. An interesting pro- 
gram has been arranged. 

The Scholarship Day address will be 
given by Dr. James F. Norris, of the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Dr. Norris is president of the American 
Chemical Society, chairman of the Di- 
vision of Chemistry and Technology of 
the National Research Council, and 
head of the Department of Organic 
Chemistry at M. I. T. His topic will be 
"Scholarship and Research." 

The Glee IClub will furnish music, 
announcements will be made of elections 
to honor societies, and medals, prizes 
and scholarship cups will be (presented. 
Faculty members should urge students 
in their sections to attend the exercises. 

Members of honor societies and their 
candidates will be seated in the center 
section of the Auditorium, and faculty 
members will be seated in the front 
side sections. Academic costume will 
not be worn. 



SERIES OF LECTURES 

A series of lectures on Abnormal 
Psychology and Mental Hygiene by Dr. 
Horace V. Pike, Director of Clinical 
Psychiatry, Danville State Hospital, 
has been arranged by the School of 
Education. The first is scheduled for 
Thursday evening, April 23, at 8:15 in 
the Auditorium. Others will follow on 
April 30, May 7, and May 21, and the 
series will be concluded with a visit 
to the state hospital on Saturday, 
May 23. Faculty members are invited. 



WORLD FLIERS HERE APRIL 30 

The visit of the World Fliers to 
Penn State, previously announced for 
April 14, was cancelled by the War 
Department, necessitating a postpone- 
ment of their visit until April 30. De- 
tails will be given in next week's Bul- 
letin. 



EDUCATION CONFERENCE 
Members of the faculty and students 
are invited to attend the World Con- 
ference on Education which will be 
held in Edinburgh, Scotland, July 20 
to 28. The National Education Asso- 
ciation is arranging for accommoda- 
tions for teachers on the Canopic, sail- 
ing from New York July 8. The trip 
will cost from $300 to $500. Further 
information can toe secured from the 
Department of Public Information. 



BULLETIN OUT EARLY 

In order that full announcement could 
be made of Scholarship Day, the Bul- 
letin is being printed a day earlier this 
week and should reach all faculty mem- 
bers on Monday. 



CALENDAR 



oo, 



Old 



TUESDAY, April 21 
Scholarship Day exercises, 10 : 30, Au 
ditorium. 

American Chemical Society, 
Amphiteatre. 

WEDNESDAY, April 22 
'Lecture, Dean Wendt, 7:30 
Chapel. 

THURSDAY, April 23 
Lecture, Dr. Pike, 8:15, Auditorium. 

SATURDAY, April 25 
Lacrosse, Penn State vs. Onondaga 
Indians, 1:30, New Beaver; baseball, 
Susquehanna, 2:30, New Beaver. 

Thespians .in "Wooden Shoes", 8:15, 
Auditorium. 

SUNDAY, April 2G 
Chapel Speaker — Dr. Martin G. Brum- 
baugh, President of Juniata College, 
Huntingdon, Pa. 

TUESDAY, April 28 
Liberal Arts lecture, Dr. Pattee, 7 : 00, 
Old Chapel. 

NEW DEPARTMENT 
Trustee action at a meeting several 
weeks ago created the courses in In- 
dustrial Education into a Department 
of Industrial Education. 



'FIFTY FAMOUS FARMERS" 

The life and work of the late Dr. 
Henry Prentiss Armsby, former direc- 
tor of the Institute of Animal Nutri- 
tion, are summarized in a book recent- 
ly added to the library. The title of 
the book is "Fifty Famous Farmers," 
and Dr. Armsby's name appears in the 
section devoted to administrators of 
agriculture. The Bulletin is indebted 
to Mr. Werner of the English depart- 
ment for this information. 

o 

AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY 

Dr. James F. Norris, president of the 
American Chemical Society, will ad- 
dress the State College section of the 
society on Tuesday, April 21, at 8:00 p. 
m. in the Amphitheatre of the Chem- 
istry Annex. The subject of his ad- 
dress will be "The Relation between 
Structure and the Reactivity of the 
Hydroxyl Group in Alcohols". 

On Wednesday evening, April 22, 
Dean G. L. Wendt, of the School of 
Chemistry and Physics, will speak on 
"The Story of Gasoline" at 7:30 in Old 
Chapel. This will be a joint meeting 
with the local section of the American 
Society of Mechanical Engineers, as 
part of Oil and Gas Power week. 



LIBERAL ARTS LECTURE 

The April lecture in the Liberal Arts 
.series will be given by Dr. F. L. Pat- 
tee on Tuesday evening, April 28, at 
7:00 .in Old Chapel. His subject will 
be '"Lafcadio Hearn." 



F W D if N K T r 

^ 1 T T R r p ;, f a p *r o 

w ;. Lw 1 u L u n L J » - v i O 



Published every Tuesday 
ring the college year as a 
;ans of making official an- 
uncements and presenting 
ms of interest to the faculty. 



Ivania State College 




>LUME 4 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

TRUSTEE DIES 

Dr. J. George Becht, State Superin- 
ldent of Public Instruction and a 
amber of the college Board of Trus- 
ts, died on Sunday in a Philadelphia 
spital. 



TABULATING MACHINES 

Heads of departments contemplating 
3 purchase of tabulating machines or 
ndex filing systems are requested to 
;et at the office of the Registrar on 
ednesday, April 29, at 4:00 p. m. 
o ■ 

AUTOMOBILE PARKING 



jThe automobile season is now open 
id faculty members are daily infring- 
k upon the regulations of the college 
Warding the parking of cars. Use the 
rking spaces provided, and cars own- 
by persons not affiliated with the 
lege can then be more readily hand- 
;i— R. I. Webber. 



STUDENT DIES 



[Attention of the faculty is called to 
jj? death of H. B. Groom, a member 
ij the Senior class, on April 15. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
ijidents have left college: 
I 3 Carmody, Helen, AL 

4 Heck, H. W., Cer. 
I 4 Houser, L. M., EE 
. 3 Johnston, A. H., Met. 
I A iLongenecker, G. G., 2 yr. Ag. 

4 McFerren, R. W., OB 
J 3 Myers, R. E., ME 

2 Taylor, F. I., PM 

Pennsylvania place names 

Bspenshade's "Pennsylvania Place 
iimes," the first book whose publica- 
pn has been sponsored by the College, 
|is just been issued from the Evan- 
slical Press of Harrisburg. This 
jiok, which is an octavo volume of 
[6 pages, makes its appearance as No. 
j in "The Pennsylvania State College 
.udies in History and Political Sci- 
lce Series." 

A limited edition of 1500 copies has 
sen printed, of which nearly 1000 have 
?en ordered in advance of publiea- 
;on. It is hoped that members of the 
j.culty who have sent in advance ord- 
|"s may find it convenient to call for 
j copy at 228 Main Building, so as to 
void the necessity of sending the 
3oks through the mail. 

It is still possible for those who did 
ot send in an advance order to obtain 

copy if they do not wait too long, 
he present indications are that the 
50 copies not taken by advance ord- 
r$ will not last long. 



Contributions must be &» 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



State College, Pa., April 28, 1925 



NUMBER 29 



FATHERS' DAT 

Penn State will celebi-ate its fourth 
annual Fathers' Day on Saturday, 
May 2. An effort has been made to 
get the fathers here in large numbers 
and the students are arranging an ex- 
cellent program for their entertain- 
ment. It remains for the faculty to 
do their part in making the "Dads" 
feel a warm welcome to the campus. 
This can best be done by making a 
personal effort to meet the fathers of 
students with whom you are in most 
intimate contact. 

I am sure that you will willingly 
cooperate in making this Fathers' Day 
one that the parents will long remem- 
ber and one that will everlastingly ce- 
ment their friendship and loyalty to 
Penn State. 

JOHN M. THOMAS. 



The fourth annual meeting of the 
Association of Parents of Penn State 
State will take place in the Auditorium 
on Saturday morning at 10:00. The 
px'ogram will be as follows : 

1. Music. 

2. President's Remarks — Mr. J. S. 

Musser. 

3. Address— What the $8,000,000 Bond 

Issue Would Mean to the Col- 
lege, President Thomas. 

4. Discussion — How the Parents' As- 

sociation Can Help. 

5. Discussion — The Problem of 

Choosing a Calling. Opened by 
Dean Sackett. 

6. Brief Business Session. 

7. General Discussion — The Future 

of the Parents' Association. 



WORLD FLIERS HERE 

To accommodate all who wish to 
hear the World Fliers in the Auditor- 
ium on Thursday night, April 30, ar- 
rangements have been made to have 
Lieutenants Arnold and Wade give two 
complete lectures and sho<wings of their 
films. The first, at 7 o'clock, will be 
for students; the second to start as 
?oon as the Auditorium can be cleared, 
about 8:45, will be for faculty, towns- 
people, visitors and students unable to 
get in for the first lecture. The same 
program will be followed for both lec- 
tures. Admission will be free. Talks 
and pictures consume about an hour 
and a half. The fliers will be asked 
to meet faculty members informally 
at the University Club following the 
second lecture, at about 10:30. 



o- 



TENNIS TOURNAMENT 

A faculty tennis tournament is being 
arranged, for singles only. Those de- 
siring to take part should turn in their 
names of W. L. Werner, P. Schweitz- 
er, or P. L. Fatout on or before April 
30. Drawings will be posted at the 
University Club. There will be no en- 
try fee. 



CALENDAR 

TUESDAY, April 28 
Liberal Arts Lecture, Dr. Pattee, 
7:00, Old Chapel. 

THURSDAY, April 30 
World Fliers, Auditorium. Student 
meeting 7:00; Faculty, 8:45. 
j FRIDAY, May 1 

Y. M. C. A. Entertainment course 
number, Tandy Mackenzie, 8:00, Audi- 
torium. 

SATURDAY, May 2 
Fathers' Day. Parents' Association 
meeting, 10:000, Auditorium. Baseball 
Penn State vs. Carnegie Tech, 2:00: 
Freshmen vs. Bucknell Reserves, 4:00. 
Penn State Players at University 
Club. Smoker for members only. 
SUNDAY, May 3 
Chapel speaker — President Thomas. 

MONDAY, May 4 
Agricultural discussion, University 
Club. 8:00. 'Leaders— R. D. Anthony 
and F. D. Gardner. 



PENN'A ACAD. OF SCIENCE 

Penn State faculty members partic- 
ipated actively in the annual meeting 
of the Pennsylvania Academy of Sci- 
ence held at Harrisburg during the 
Easter holidays. Two papers were read, 
one by Professor J. P. Kelly, of the 
Botany Department on " 'Quaker Lad- 
ies' as a Possible State Flower for 
Pennsylvania," and one by Professors 
Marsh W. White and W. R. Ham, of 
the Physics department, on "The En- 
ergy of High Velocity Electrons and 
Ithe Variation of thejir Masisi with 
Speed." 

At the business session. Dr. F. D. 
Kern was re-elected treasurer. A tent- 
ative organization of a Section of Phy- 
sics and Mathematics was authorized 
and Professor White was elected sec- 
retary of the section. Sections in oth- 
er sciences are also expected to be 
organized. 

Many members of the faculty are al- 
ready members of the organization and 
all who are interested in science are 
urged to join. Application blanks may 
be obtained from Dr. Kern or Dr. Kel- 
ly at the Botany Building. 



CHANGE REGULATION 

At its last meeting, the College Sen- 
ate approved the following recom- 
mendation of the Committee on Aca- 
demic Standards changing Section 35 
of the Regulations Affecting Students 
to the following: 

"Whenever a student is dropped from 
college on account of poor scholarship, 
he shall, if reinstated, be required to 
repeat all subjects in which he is de- 
ficient regardless of whether the de- 
ficiency is a condition or failure, it be- 
ing understood that this rule applies 
only to a student re-admitted to the 
school from which he was dropped." 



E.W.RUNKLE. 

2 1 LIBERAL ARTS 



Published every Tuesday 
;ring the college year as a 
isans of making official an- 
uncements and presenting 
-ms of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be &,» 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



OLUME 4 



State College, Pa., May 5, 1925 



NUMBER 30 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

NOTICE TO INSTRUCTORS 

nstructors desiring rooms for final 
.minations arranged by appointment 
1 please call the College Scheduling 
:cer on Tuesday, May 5, or Tuesday, 
y 12.^C. E. Bullinger. 

o 

STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

)uring the past week the following 
dents have left college: 

2 Allegar, D. E., AgEc. 

2 Bond, P. H., Ed 

2 Heffner, Alice V., Ed 
4 Murray, W. R., Ed 

3 Schanche, F. K., PL, 

o 

STUDENTS DROPPED 

The following students have been 
opped for continued poor scholar- 
ip: 
3 Kerr, A., CE (Permanently) 

3 Krutulis, S. L., AE 

4 McFerren, R. C, CE 
4 Sturgeon, P. J., ME 
4 Wise, A. G., CE 

o— 

FRESHMAN WEEK 

At its April meeting the College 
nate approved the recommendation 
the Council of Administration for 
e establishment of a Freshman Week 
I the fall, and President Thomas ap- 
'inted the following committee on 
rangements: Chaplain Metzger, 

'.airman; Deans Sackett, Stoddart, 
I'arnock, Holbrook, Wendt, and Ray; 
;iss Vought; Professors Bezdek, D. A. 
itiderson, Bressler, R. W. Grant, and 
lOffman; and Captain Bresnahan. 



RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

| At its April meeting, the ColUge 
mate apv. roved a recommendation of 
lie Co.TimiUee on Academic Standards 
| amr.i;l ] aragraph 62 of the Regula- 
Jons ^Jiec ing -Students as follows: 
i "A c and late for the bachelor's de- 
cree ii an course in the college shall 
jursue no less than thirty credits of 
jie re^iuiri d work in residence, which 
(.ia.ll be approved by the head of the 
(apartment concerned. The time spent 
|i residence shall be not less than two 
jjmesters .mmediately preceding grad- 
uation or five summer sessions (ag- 
]regating a minimum of thirty cred- 
s), three of wmich must be taken in 
3nsecutive order preceding gradua- 
on." 



Professor G. R. Green, of the De- 
artment of Nature Study, recently 
ave an illustrated lecture on economic 
irds at the Messiah Bible College, 
rantham, Pa. 



GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS 

'The Executive Committee of the 
trustees at its last meeting voted, that 
in accordance with a recommendation 
of the Council of Administration, there 
be established a rank in the collegiate 
staff to be known as Graduate Scholar- 
ships, with approximate equal require- 
ments in all departments as to service 
to the college and as to privilege tor 
graduate study, according to the fol- 
lowing regulations: 

1. Appointees must have an ap- 
proved bachelor's degree and must 
sbow promise of ability to do research 
or 'to carry on graduate stduy. 

2. Service to the college shall re- 
quire not more than one-fiifth the 
time required of instructors or full 
time assistants in the school or de- 
partment in which employed. 

2. Appointments shall be made by 
the Graduate Faculty on recommend- 
ation of department heads and deans. 

4. Graduate scholars will serve as 
assistants in classroom or laboratory 
instruction or in research or office 
work. 

5. Appointments to be for ten 
months, September 1 to June 30 — spec- 
ial appointments for the Summer Ses- 
sion may be made. 

6. There shall be no compensation 
except as provided in paragraph 9. 

7. Enrollment in the Graduate 
School is obligatory and a ifull sched- 
ule shall be carried. 

8. The appointee, to a Graduate 
Scholarship shall be eligible to re-ap- 
pointment while a candidate for an ad- 
vanced degree. 

9. The appointee to a Graduate 
Scholarship shall pay registration and 
graduation fees, but is exempt from 
the graduate student and practicum 
fees. 

o 

WIVES OF FACULTY MEMBERS 

The wives of faculty members and 
all other women who may be interest- 
ed are cordially invited to attend any 
of the lectures of the Vocational Guid- 
ance Conference which is to be held 
May 5 and 6 in the Women's Build- 
ing parlors and in the Foyer of the 
Auditorium. 

Dr. Carnell, dean of Temple Univer- 
sity, Philadelphia, is to act as direct- 
or of the conference. Other speakers 
of prominence will be Dr. Rowland, of 
Harrisburg, on "Teaching as a Pro- 
fession for Women" ; Dr. Maxfield, of 
Harrisburg, on "Opportunities in Psy- 
chology"; Miss Mary Stewart, of 
Washington, D. C, on "Business and 
Industry"; Miss Vida Hunt Francis, of 
Philadelphia, on "The Field of Medi- 
cine for Women"; Miss Sabra Vought, 
college librarian, on "Opportunities to 
be Found in Library Work" ; and Dean 
G L. Wendt, of the School of Chem- 
istry and Physics, on "Science as a 
Vocation for Women." 



CALENDAR 



TUESDAY, May 5 

Open meeting, American Association 
for the Advancement of Science, 7 : 30 
206 Ag. 

SATURDAY, May 9 

Lacrosse, Penn State vs. Crescent 
A. C. ; baseball, Freshmen vs. Wyom- 
ing Seminary. 

Entertainment course number, Flon- 
zaley Quartet, Auditorium, 8:15. 

SUNDAY, May 10 

Chapel Speaker— 4Dr. Robert Bag- 
nell, Grace M. E. Church, Harrisburg. 

SENATE ACTION 

At the last meeting of the College 
Senate, the following resolution pre- 
sented by the Committee on Publica- 
tions was adopted: 

"Contributions for consderation as 
issues of The Pennsylvania State Col- 
lege Studies shall be presented to the 
Senate Committee on Publications. No 
manuscript will be accepted finally for 
publication unless it has been first 
recommended by the department con- 
cerned and by the executive commit- 
tee of the school in which that depart- 
ment is a unit. The financing, distri- 
bution and sales of such publications 
shall be arranged for by the Publica- 
tions committee. The committee may 
consider contributions from others 
than members of the college faculty." 



MEMORIAL BOOKLET 

Members of the faculty who desire a 
copy of the Edwin E. Sparks Memor- 
ial Booklet, prepared by the special 
Senate Committee authorized by the 
Board of Trustees, may obtain the same 
by calling at the President's Office. 
Additional copies will be on sale at the 
Library at a cost of fifty cents. Part 
of the proceeds will go to the Sparks 
Memorial Fund. 



ON IMPORTANT COMMITTEE 

Professor H. W. Popp, of the Botany 
department, has been chosen to repre- 
sent plant physiology and plant pa- 
thology on a sub-committee of the Na- 
tional Research Council which has for 
its object the coordination of physical 
and biological aspects of research 
problems dealing with the general bio- 
logical effects of light, and the promo- 
tion of better cooperation of physicists 
and biologists in the solution of such 
problems. 



ELECTED CHAIRMAN 

At the organization meeting of the 
North Atlantic section of the American 
Society of Agricultural Engineers, held 
at Cornell University during the Easter 
vacation, Professor R. U. Blaslngame, 
of the Farm Machinery department, 
was elected chairman of the section. 



2 1 L I S L R A L ARTS 



lished every Tuesday 
% the college year as a 
s of making- official an- 
ements and presenting 
of interest to the faculty. 



The 



Pennsyl 



vania :>tate 



CP"C Contributions must be &,.> 

C> brief as possible, and reach 

G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor. 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



JME 4 



State College, Pa., May 12, 1925 



NUMBER 31 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

IBEEAL ARTS FACULTY 

re will be a meeting of the Lib- 
ta?ts faculty on Wednesday, May 
4:30, in Room 14, Liberal Arts 
ng — C. W. Hasek, secretary. 



HEM & PHYS. FACULTY 

re will be a meeting of the fac- 
of the School of Chemistry and 
2S on Tuesday, May 19, at 4:30, 
om 28 of the Physics Building — 
Wendt, dean. 



MILITARY FIELD DAY 

action of the Council of Admin- 
on, all regular college classes 

2 suspended on Friday afternoon, 
29, when the annual Military 
Day will be held. 

o 

SENIOR RE -EXAMS 
recent action of the College Sen- 
bolishing scheduled re-examina- 
for seniors graduating in June 

3 also to those students complet- 
e two-year course in agriculture. 
3. Hoffman. 



SUMMER REGISTRATION 

ents now in attendance will be 
red for summer session courses 

office of the clean of the school 
ch they are now enrolled on Fri- 
ld Saturday, May 15 and 16. The 

will not be open on Saturday 
oon. — W. S. Hoffman, Registrar. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

Ing the past week the following 
its have left college: 

Coder, K. R., SE 

Freed, Maurice, P)L 

Kerr, R. L„ ME 

Lemon, H. W., ME 
| McMinn, W. C, Two-yr. Ag. 
o 

STUDENT RE-ENTERS 
JVL Houser, a member of the 
|an class in Electrical Engineer- 
tho previously withdrew from col- 
has re-entered. 



REINSTATEMENTS 



following dropped students were 
|ted as of February 10: 
Bernstein, I. L., CF 
Lonberger, D. M., Agri 
Norris, F. B., CF 
Pollock, H. H, Agri 
Read, T. A., ME 



BEDDING PLANTS 

intion of faculty members is call- 
the fact that bedding plants ar-- 
in sale at the college gr^e^bousc 
they may be purchased during 
ir hours. 



FIGURES JUSTIFY ENTRANCE 

SYSTEM, REGISTRAR SHOWS 

In the. Faculty Bulletin for March 31, 
1925, the 101 students dropped under 
the fifty per cent rule at the end of 
the first semester of the present col- 
lege year were classified as to their 
relative rank in high school. Of the 
101 students, 50 were classified as 
freshmen. A comparison of the per- 
centage of failures of these 50 fresh- 
men, within each of the ithree 
classification groups, is a further indi- 
cation of the soundness and justice of 
basing the selection of freshmen upon 
relative high school records. 

The 1073 freshmen admitted last 
fall were divided into groups as fol- 
lows: 

Highest third 422 or 39.3 per cent. 

Middle third 425 or 39.6 per cent. 

Lowest third .. ... 166 or 15.4 per cent. 
Rank not given . 60 or 5.5 per cent. 
4tk i ii dropped were di- 

videcrnnto groups according to the fol- 
lowing table : 

Highest third 7 or 14 per cent. 

Middle third 13 or 26 per cent. 

Lowest third 26 or 52 per cent. 

Rank not given 4 or 8 per cent. 

It is interesting to note that those 
graduated in the lowest third of their 
high school class, and who comprise 
but 15.4 per cent of the group admit- 
ted, furnished more than one-half of 
the failures. The number of upper and 
middle thirders admitted was almost 
exactly equal in number. The number 
of middle thirders dropped, however, is 
within one of being twice as large as 
the number dropped from the highest 
group. 

The precentage of failures within 
each group indicates the first semest- 
er mortality to be expected whenever 
a freshman is granted admission, as 
follows: 

Highest thirder 1.6 per cent. 

Middle thirder 3.0 per cent. 

Lowest thirder ... 15.6 per cent, 

The number and percentage of fail- 
ures by schools for the fifty freshmen 
dropped are as follows: 

No. INo. P. C. 

Adm't'd Dropd Drop'd 

Ag 144 14 9.7 

Chem. & Phys. 147 3 2.0 

Ed 102 1 1.0 

Eng 393 16 4.0 

L A __.. 255 15 5.8 

M. M 32 1 3.1 

Total 1073 50 4.6 

The schools varying greatly from the 
percentage for the entire class are the 
schools of Agriculture, Chemistry and 
Physics, and Education, the first nam- 
ed being far higher and the other two 
much lower. A study of the percentage 
of enrollment of lowest thirders for the 
freshman class in each school, as given 
in the following table, indicates that 
the School of Agriculture had a high 



CALENDAR 



WEDNESDAY, May 13 
Liberal Arts faculty, 4:30, in 14 LA. 

FRIDAY, May 15 
Tennis, Penn State vs. Michigan 
Aggies, 3:30. 

Phi Kappa Phi initiation, University 
Club. 6:00; dinner and annual meeting, 
7:00. All members are invited. 

Penn State Players, Auditorium, 8:15. 

SATURDAY, May 16 
Interscholastic Day track meet. Var- 
sity events — Penn State vs. Navy, 
track; West Virginia, baseball; Syra- 
cuse, tennis. See posters. 

SUNDAY, May 17 
Chapel Speaker — Dr. A. J. Alexand- 
er, First Presbyterian Church, Beav- 
er, Pa. 

percentage of lowest thirders, and that 
Chemistry and Physics and Education 
both had low percentages of lowest 
thirders: 

Enroll- Lowest Per 
ment Thirders Cent 

Ag 144 30 20.8 

Chem. & Phys. 147 16 10.8 

Ed 102 8 7.8 

Eng 393 65 16.5 

L. A 255 38 14.9 

M. M 32 9 28.1 

Total 1073 166 15.4 

The School of Mines and Metallurgy 
has not been considered in the above 
classification on account of the small 
numbers involved. 

■ o 

PENN STATE PLAYERS 

The Penn State Plavers will give a 
second performance of ''The Whole 
Town's Talking" in the Auditorium on 
Friday night. May 15, at 8:15. When 
given earlier in the year, the farce won 
m-uch favorable comment from those 
who witnessed it. It carries a laugh 
in almost every line. The play is di- 
rected by Professor D. D. Mason. 
Tickets are on sale at the State Shirt 
Shop and will also be on sale at the 
box office on Friday night. 



RE-ELECTED SECRETARY 

At the annual convention of the As- 
sociation of Alumni Secretaries and 
Alumni Magazines Associated, held at 
Lehigh University recently, E. N. Sul- 
livan, local alumni secretary, was re- 
elected secretary of the Alumni Maga- 
zines Associated and was appointed 
chairman of the Committee on Adver- 
tising. 



Professor George R. Green, of the 
Nature Study department, recently 
gave illustrated talks before the Al- 
toona and Johnstown junior high 
schools. 



F . ft . 



"VXKLr 



i~ ■ p <- 



o L £ A r 
A * -H i. 



4 ,o 7. 



Published every Tuesday 
iring the college year as a 
eans of making official an- 
mncements and presenting 
sins of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be &*> 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



)LUME 4 



State College, Pa., May 19, 1925 



NUMBER 32 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



>MMEN!CEMENT RESPONSIBILITY 

It is earnestly to be desired that ev- 
y chair which can be alotted to 
smbers of the faculty on the stage at 
immencement exercises be occupied, 
formation reaches me that up to 
ie present time only about half the 
tsired number have signified their 
itention to join the group in academ- 
j costume on the stage. I hope the 
•jll quota will be filled without furth- 
| delay. 

Jit is expected that all members of 
e faculty will remain for Comtmence- 
Isnt and attend the public exercises, 
'Jess excused for important reasons. 
[trust that each member of the fac- 
,ty will feel himself one of the hosts 
5 the alumni, parents, and friends vis- 
ing the College at Commencement, 
id assume responsibility in making 
;e occasion a pleasant one 'for all our 
ends. 

JOHN M. THOMAS. 



o 

COLLEGE SENATE 

JThe regular meeting of the College 
[nate will take place on Thursday 
ening, May 21, at 7:30, in the Foyer 
the Auditorium. 



AGRICULTURAL FACULTY 

There will be a meeting of the fac- 
ty of the School of Agriculture on 
mrsday, May 21, at 4:30, in Room 
6, Agricultural Building. — R. L. 
atts, dean. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

There will be a meeting of the fac- 
ty of the School of Education on 
tesday, May 19, at 4:30, in Room K 
the Library. — H. G. Parkinson, sec- 
'tary. 

o 

GRADE REPORTS 

AH grades should be reported in hon- 
' points at the end of the present 
mester to the offices of the deans and 
the Registrar in conformity with the 
ition of the College Senate. — W.. S. 
offman. 



SENIOR GRADES 

j Senior grades should be delivered at 
lie office of the Registrar iwithin one 
leek of the last meeting of the class, 
ith the exception of those classes 
eeting on Friday and Saturday. In- 
ismuch as Commencement has been 
joved forward to Monday, it will be 
j?cessary that the final corrections to 
oof on the Commencement program 
I made Friday noon preceding. Grade 
ports should therefore be in the 
?nds of the Registrar not later than 
00 p. m., on Thursday, June 11. 



The Registrar will deem it a persona' 
favor if grades are delivered in per- 
son. — W. S. Hoffman. 



CALENDAR 



SPECIMEN EXAM PAPERS 

The Council of Administration at its 
meeting on May 6, 1925, agreed to co- 
operate with the Bureau of Collegiat? 
Educational Research by submitting to 
them a complete file of final examin- 
ations offered at this college in June. 
The office of the Registrar has been 
irstructed to act as the agency for 
collecting these papers and forwarding 
them to the Bureau. 

The teaching staff is therefore in- 
structed to send to the office of the 
Registrar one copy of each final ex- 
amination offered. The anvelope in 
which the examination is enclosed 
should be plainly marked, "S-pe^imen 
Final Examination." — <W. S. Hoffman. 

FACULTY PARTICIPATION IN 

COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES 

The sub-committee appointed to take 
charge of the exercises of Commence- 
ment Day is seeking the cooperation 
of the faculty in an endeavor to maks 
the occasion impressive. This will not 
be possible without the presence of a 
considerable number of the faculty, 
and in academic costume. The very 
sparse attendance of the faculty at 
recent Commencement exercises, and 
the varied costumes in. evidence, have 
not been a credit to the College. 

The seating capacity of the stage of 
the Auditorium is about 120. The com- 
mittee is of the opinion that this num- 
ber should be drawn primarily from 
two sources — members of the College 
Senate and members of the faculty of 
full professional rank — although it is 
hoped and expected that many other 
members of the faculty also will at- 
tend. Room for all will be provided, 
either on the stage or on the floor of 
the Auditorium. 

A canvass of the two groups men- 
tioned above has secured acceptances 
from 70. The committee would be very 
glad to hear from any other members 
of the faculty who can attend. 

While there is no desire to debar 
any member of the faculty because of 
the lack of cap and gown, the commit- 
tee is strongly of ' the opinion that 
the mixed dress of previous years is 
undesirable. Dr. C. E. Myers, of the 
Department of Horticulture, is in 
charge of the purchase or renting of 
academic costumes. Arrangements for 
rental or purchase should be made 
with him by Wednesday, May 20, on 
which date orders must be sent to tha 
firm supplying the costumes. Mem- 
bers of the faculty who are provided 
with academic costume and expect 
to be present will please notify the 
office of Dr. Fletcher. — Committee: W. 
S. Dye, Jr., C. E. Bullinger, and S. W. 
Fletcher, chairman. 



TUESDAY, May 19 

Chemistry and Physics faculty meet- 
ing, 4:30, Room 26, Physics Building. 

Education faculty, 4:30, Room K, 
Library. 

THURSDAY, May 21 

Agricultural faculty, 4:30, Room 206 
Ag. 

College Senate, 7:30, Foyer. 
FRIDAY, May 22 

Baseball, Freshmen vs. Potomac 
State, 4:30. 

One-act plays, Auditorium, 8:20. 
SATURDAY, May 23 

Track, Freshmen vs. Cornell Fresh- 
men; baseball, Freshmen vs. Kiski.. 
SUNDAY, May 24 

Chapel speaker — The Reverend Vin- 
cent G. Burns, South Congregational 
Church, Pittsfield, Mass. 

TUESDAY, May 26 

Liberal Arts lecture, Professor de 
Vis me — "French Prjovinoeft' — A Bird's 
Eye View," 7:00. Old Chapel. 

TREASURER'S OFFICE OPEN 

Beginning May 20, the Treasurer's 
Office will be open during the noon 
hour on pay days — the 1st, 5th, and 
20th of each month. When pay days 
fall on Sunday, checks will be given 
out on Monday. 



ONE- ACT PLAYS 

The Playshop, English 302, a college 
course in play production, will present 
four one-act plays in the Auditorium 
on Friday evening. May 22, at 8:20. 
The plays to be presented are "Trifles," 
a serious study by Susan Glaspell; 
' The House Beautiful," a comedy by 
May Hanna; "The Clod," a melodrama 
by Lewis Beach: and "The Medicine 
Show," a character sketch hy Stuart 
Walker. 

Members of the faculty wishing to 
see the plays can secure invitations 
at the English office, 310 Main Build- 
ing, or at the Players' office in the 
Auditorium. Admission is free but a 
collection will be taken to defray ex- 
penses. 

o 

AIDS IN ORGANIZATION 

Professor J. B. Shaw, of the Depart- 
ment of Ceramics, recently assisted in 
the organization of the American Re- 
fractories Institute, an organization 
■whose purpose is to promote scientific 
•research in refractories and coopera- 
tion between the producers and con- 
sui.ners of the same. Professor Shaw 
read a paper at the meeting, bringing 
to tfae attention of the institute the 
Department of Ceramics at Penn State 
and suggesting the establishment of 
research fellowships at this college. 



E . % . HUNK j- L 



i LIBERAL A-RTS 



r ft' 



■ ., ! l 



I 



Published every Tuesday 
iring the college year as a 
eans of making official an- 
luncements and presenting 
ijns of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be h.. 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



3LUME 4 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



HOLIDAYS 

By action of the Council of Adminis- 
ition, all regular classes will be sus- 
nded on Friday ofternoon, May 29, 
cause of the Military Field Day. Sat- 
day is Memorial Day and is listed in 
e calendar as a college holiday. 

o 

STUDENT WITHDRAWS 
During the past week the following 
ident has left college: 
McCurdy, A. A., Agro 



SENIOR EXAMINATIONS 
The attention of all instructors is 
lain called to the action of the Senate, 
jder date of January 15, 1925, where- 
the special week for senior exami- 
Itions, as scheduled prior to this year, 
I discontinued. 

|j\U scheduled work for the present 
inester will end at 5:20 p. m. on Fri- 
|y, June 6. Final examinations for all 
llidents, except those graduating this 
Luc, will be given during the following 
i|ek. Seniors or second year students 
the two-year course in agriculture 
ibuld not be required to take any ex- 
ijiinations after Friday, June 6. — W. 
' Hoffman, Registrar. 



REGARDING ATTENDANCE 

^t its meeting last Thursday evening, 

! College Senate approved the follow- 

; recommendation of the Committee 

Attendance: 

Whenever a student has been ab- 

it without excuse from a subject as 

ny consecutive times as there are 

prcises per week in that subject (or 

j;:he case of subjects in which the class 

lets but once a week has incurred 

[jo consecutive absences), the instruc- 

li shall report the fact to the student's 

Ijin. The dean shall then investigate the 

[lie and if he finds that the student has 

j;t college shall report the fact to the 

llgdstrar." 

J 

ATTENDS CONVENTION 

Professor N. C. Miller, of the Engi- 
bring Extension department, recent- 
I attended the annual meeting of the 
jjtional University Extension Associa- 
tion held at the University of Vir- 
I'lia. In addition to leading the dis- 
cission on the teaching of radio by 
Ij.ensi in. Professor Miller presented 
li'epoi t for the Committee on Evalu- 
j|on o:" University Degrees with refer- 
||:e to correspondence credit. He is 
l|iirm:'n of this committee. 



UNIVERSITY CLUB 

i>he regular Ladies' Night dinner and 
ice will be held at the University Club 
Friday evening, May 29, at 6:30. 
reservations must be made with 
i steward by noon on Wednesdav, 
V 21. 



State College, Pa., May 26, 1925 



NUMBER 33 



OCCUPATIONS OF PARENTS 
By Win. S. Hoffman, Registrar 

Each student, at the time of his 
matriculation, fills out an information 
card for the files of the Registrar. 
Among the questions answered is one 
requesting information as to the oc- 
cupation of the student's father. 

A classification of the occupations of 
fathers of the 3483 undergraduate stu- 
dents in attendance during the first 
semester of the present college year 
has been made, based upon the follow- 
ing divisions: (1) those engaged in 
industrial or manufacturing projects, 
but not employed as operatives; (2) 
artisans, craftsmen, or workmen; (3) 
those engaged in commercial callings; 
(4) those engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits; (5) members of the various pro- 
fessions; (6) those holding clerical po- 
sitions; (7) officials of the nation, 
state, county, or township; (8) a 
miscellaneous group comprising all 
who are not included in the above. 

Of the 3483 students considered, 363 
stated that their father was deceased, 
or retired, or without occupation. The 
remaining 3120 were divided among the 
eight groups as follows: 

Per- 
cent- 
Group No. age 

Industrial 031 20.22 

Artisan 568 18.21 

Mercantile 519 16.63 

Agricultural 49-3 15.80 

Professional 345 11.06 

Clerical (2,26 7 ; .24 

Official 93 2.98 

Miscellaneous 24)5 7.85 

The number of parents in each of 
the twelve leading occupations, with- 
out respect to the foregoing groups, is 
as follows : 

1. Farmers, 423; 2. Storekeepers, 
320; 3. iSupts. and Managers, 286; 4. 
Railroad employes, 146; 5. Laborers, 
118; 6. Salesmen, 109; 7. Clerks, 94; 
8. Manufacturers, 84; 9. Physicians, 
77; 10. Carpenters, 76; 11. Contract- 
ors, 69; 12. Machinists, 6,1. 

The parents engaged in the above 
twelve occupations are 1863, or 59.71 
per cent of the entire number classi- 
fied. The first three occupations com- 
prise nearly one-third of the present 
"parents of Penn State." 

A similar study was made by Pro- 
fessor A. H. Espenshade in 1914, just 
ten years ago. At that time the twelve 
leading occupations were: 

1. Farmers; 2. Storekeepers: 3. Supts. 
and Managers; 4. Railroad Employes; 
5. Manufacturers; 6. Salesmen; 7. 

Physicians; 8. Contractors; 9. Carpen- 
ters; 10. Lawyers; 11. Ministers; 12. 
Clerks. 

A few new professions mentioned in 
1924. not listed in 1914, are: Horticul- 
turist, 17; Poultrymen, 5; Consulting 
Engineer, 3; Nutrition expert, 2. The 
9 fathers employed as draymen in 1914 
are supplanted by 5 chauffeurs and by 
3 draymen in 1924. 

The Volstead act has removed liquor 



CALENDAR 



TUESDAY, May 2<i 

Liberal Arts lecture, 7:00, Old Chapel, 

FRIDAY, May 29 
No afternoon classes, Military Field 
Day. 
Ladies' Night, University Club. 

SATURDAY, May 30 
Memorial Day. Athletic program: 
Penn State vs. Bucknell, baseball; Penn, 
lacrosse; Bucknell, tennis. See post- 
ers. 

SUNDAY, May 31 
Chapel Speaker — 'Bishop Ethelbert 
Talbot, D. D., Bethlehem, Pa. 

dealers, bottlers and brewers from the 
list of occupations, whereas 12 fathers 
were so employed in 1914; but the 
classification in 1914 showed no police- 
men, while in 1924 there are seven. 
Civil service employes have jumped 
from 4 in 191 i to 33 in 1924, and tax 
collectors from 1 to 13. 



ENGINEERING DINNER 

Local members of the Society for the 
F'romotion of Engineering Education 
will hold a dinner meeting at the Uni- 
versity Club on Wednesday, May 27, at 
5:45. AH members of the faculty who 
teach engineering students are invited 
to attend. Reservations should be made 
with Professor O. K. Harlan, 206 En- 
gineering C, not later than 5:00 p. m. on 
Tuesday, May 26. 

o 

HANDBOOK OF GRAMMAR 

Professor Mason Long, o' the Eng- 
lish department, has just completed a 
Handbook of English Grammar which 
is being published by Harcourt, Brace 
and Company, of New York City. It 
is to be ready for use by September 
first. The book contains a brief but 
comprehensive survey of the principles 
of English grammar. 

o 

LIBERAL ART* LECTURE 
The final lecture in the Liberal Arts 
series will be given in the Old Chapel to- 
night (Tuesday), at 7:00. Dr. H. P.W. 
de Vlsme will speak on "French Pro- 
vinces — A Bird's Eye View." 

o 

APPOINTED DELEGATE 
Dean Gerald L. Wendt. of the School 
of Chemistry and Physics, has been 
appointed a delegate for the National 
Research Council at the Congress of 
the International Union of Pure and 
Applied Chemistry to be held at Buch- 
arest, Roumania, during the week of 
June 21. 

o 

In response to a petition from var- 
ious members of the faculty, Professor 
l^ezdek has set aside tennis court 
n umber 12, the one nearest Allen 
Street, for faculty use. 



-: i L I B L 



P ' ' n K is 



' 



- v 



Published every Tuesday 
iring the college year as a 
eans of making official an- 
mncements and presenting 
mis of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be a* 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



3LUME 4 



State College, Pa., June 2, 1925 



NUMBER 34 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

JUNE SENATE MEETING 

The regular June meeting of the 
liege Senate has been called for 
Jednesday evening, June 10, at 7:'30, 
I the Foyer of the Auditorium. 

o 

STUDENTS WITHDRAW 
During the past week the following 
indents have left college: 
4 Barton, L. W., Hrt. 

3 Davis, H. W., RME 

4 Dickson, W. J., Met 
2 Fickes, P. A., CF 

4 Miller, G. M., EchE 
4 Plain, IL. C, CE 



SUMMER WORK 

Jhe Council of Administration at its 
feting of February 4, 1924, voted 
Slat, beginning with the summer of 
VA, students should not receive 
Slides for summer 'work, but should 
leive credit only. This does not ap- 
l|- to work taken in the Summer Ses- 
|n or under the direct supervision of 
Bregular member of the faculty. — W. 
I Hoffman, Registrar. 



COMMITTEES AUTHORIZED 

It its last meeting, the College Senate 
proved recommendations of the Com- 
ttee on Student Welfare as follows: 
1 . "That the' Committee on Athletics, 
jident Welfare, and Publications, 
itly, be requested to report to the 
iiate a scholarship eligibility rule that 
[ill apply to all extra-curricula activ- 
« under the jurisdiction of these 
■nmittees." 

I. "That the President appoint a 
nimittee of three, not necessarily from 
Senate, to cooperate with a com- 
.tee from Student Council, to inves- 
[ite the operation of Student Gov- 
ment at other institutions, and to 
ommend such amendments to the 
sent form of government as may be 
flirable." 

I . "That the President appoint a ocm- 
ILtee of three, not necessarily from the 
Iiate, to be ready to cooperate with 
1 Code Committee of Student C'oun- 
I in creating sentiment for the ob- 
Slvance of a Penn State Code." 

ART EXHIBIT 

inhere will be an exhibition of the 
Irk of the freshman girls in Applied 
j!: on Wednesday, June 3, in the Fine 
Is Museum, 284 Main Building. Ex- 
9'ples of work in bloek-printing, ba- 
1 and parchment shade decoration 
III be on display. The hours are from 
to 5:00 and from 7:00 to 9:00. 



COMMENCEMENT FEATURES 

Although the revised Commencement 
program is no doubt familiar to most 
members of the faculty, a brief sur- 
vey of its most important features will 
be of interest at this time. Under the 
new arrangement, events begin Friday 
afternoon, June 12, and end Monday 
night, June 15. 

Friday will be Senior-Junior Day. 
Alumni conferences will be held by 
the various schools and departments 
during the afternoon. Trustee elec- 
tions will be held in the afternoon, 
with the annual meeting of the Alumni 
Association and alumni dinner in the 
evening. Evening features will be a 
good fellowship mixer on the front cam- 
pus, with band concert and singing; 
the Penn -State Players in "Seven Keys 
to Baldpate"; and an alumni-senior- 
junior dance in the Armory. 

Saturday will be Alumni Day, with 
an alumni-senior baseball game in the 
morning, followed by the alumni 
luncheon at the Big Tent. The seniors 
will be welcomed into the Alumni As- 
sociation in the afternoon, followed by 
a parade to New Beaver for a baseball 
game with Syracuse. The annual meet- 
ing of the Trustees will be held in the 
afternoon. Following clasp banquets 
and reunions in the evening will be the 
Thespian performance of "Wooden 
Shoes," and an alumni-senior- junior 
dance in the Armory. 

On Baccalaureate Sunday, the ser- 
mon will be preached by Bishop Robert 
L. Harris, D. D., of Marquette, Mich- 
igan. The band will give a concert on 
the front campus in the afternoon. 
Doctor Arthur Holmes, of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, formerly dean 
of the general faculty at Penn State, 
will speak at the Vesper Service in the 
Open Air Theatre. A concert will be 
given in the Auditorium in the eve- 
ning. 

Monday will be Commencement Day, 
opening with Senior Class Day exer- 
cises in the Open Air Theatre in the 
morning. Preceding the Commence- 
ment procession in the afternoon, the 
various schools will tender a reception 
to alumni, seniors, and parents. The 
Commencement exercises will include 
an address by the Honorable Wendell 
Philips Stafford, Associate Justice oif 
the Supreme Court of the District of 
Columbia. A musical clubs' concert in 
the evening will be followed by the 
President's Formal Reception to alum- 
ni, seniors, uniors, faculty and guests, 
and by the formal Commencement 
Dance in the Armory. 



CALENDAR 



SATURDAY, June 6 

Athletic events — Penn State vs. Pitt 
in track, tennis and golf. 

Grange picnic, 2:00 to 7:30, woods 
near agricultural buildings. 
SUNDAY, June 7 
No chapel. 

MONDAY, June 8 
Examination week begins. 

WEDNESDAY, June 10 
College Senate, 7:30, Foyer. 

PENN STATE PLAYERS 

As their Commencement offering, 
the Penn State Players will present 
George M. Cohan's melodramatic farce, 
"Seven Keys to Baldpate," in the Au- 
ditorium on Friday evening, June 12, 
at 8:30. Tickets for this performance 
can now be obtained at the State Shirt 
Shop. The regular scale of prices, 50 
and 75 cents, will prevail. The play 
is a combination of humor and mys- 
tery guaranteed to furnish laughter 
and thrills for all. The entire produc- 
tion is under the direction of David 
D. Mason. 



TO STUDY IN EUROPE 

Mr. F. O. Nolte, instructor in French 
who is now on leave of absence at Har- 
vard University, will spend next year 
studying in Europe. He was recently 
awarded the Ottendorfer Travelling 
Fellowship, a gift open to competition 
in all the colleges and universities of 
the United States. Mr. Nolte will prob- 
ably study at the Universities of Ber- 
lin, Paris, and Zuerich. 



WRITIES SERIES OF ARTICLES 

In connection with the centennial 
celebration of the graduation of Haw- 
thorne and Longfellow, which Bowdoin 
College is abserving this year. Pro- 
fessor D. K. Merrill, of the English 
department, is publishing a series of 
newspaper articles on the writers Of 
Bowdoin. The articles are also being 
prepared for publication in book form. 



FRENCH PLAY 



The French Club will present a one- 
act play, together with an English 
version of it, entitled "French as it is 
Spoken," on Tuesday, June 2, at 7:30 
in the Old Chapel. Professor I. L. 
Foster will give an introductory talk 
and an orchestra will furnish the mu- 
sical program. The cast is composed 
of students in French. Faculty mem- 
bers are invited. 



*■* A H 'f 3 



21 L i e e e A t 






Published every Tuesday 
uring the college year as a 
leans of making official an- 
ouncements and presenting 
;ems of initerest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be tk,. 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



OLUME 4 



State College, Pa., June 9, 1925 



NUMBER 35 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



COLLEGE SENATE 

The June meeting of the College Sen- 
te has been called for Wednesday 
vening, June 10, at 7:30, in the Foy- 
: of the Auditorium. 

o 

DEPARTMENT HEADS 
The Scheduling Officer wishes to re- 
lind all heads of departments to ap- 
oint someone to act for them in 
cheduling matters while they are away 
rom the campus this summer. — C. B. 
tullinger. 

o 

ABSENT FROM EXAMS 

The Council of Administration has 
oted that students absent from exam- 
nations should have their grade re- 
:orded "ab" and that the Registrar 
hall automatically change this grade 
o a — 2 if the grade is not turned 
n to his office within four weeks of 
he date of the examination— W. S. 
loffman, Registrar. 

o • 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

1 There will be a meeting of the fac- 
ulty of the Graduate School on Tues- 
jlay, June 9, at 4:00 p. m., in the Foy- 
pr of the Auditorium. All members of 
he teaching staff having immediate 
supervision of graduate courses, as 
pell as all administrative officers, are 
hembers of the Graduate faculty. — F. 
D. Kern, dean. 

o— — — 

COMMITTEES APPOINTED 

The committees authorized at the 
''May meeting of the Senate have been 
appointed by President Thomas as 
follows: : 

; To investigate the operation of stu- 
dent government: Dean Stoddart, 
chairman; Professors Borland and 
Bomine. 

I To cooperate with the Honor Code 
'committee of Student Council: Pro- 
fessor Kinsloe, chairman; Professors 
jNoll and Chedsey. 

o 

SENIOR GRADES 

'■ Grade reports for all Seniors should 
[reach the office of the Registrar not 
: later than 5:00 p. m., Thursday, June 
11. Grades which are not received by 
the Registrar before that hour will be 
| considered as pasging_and failures wUl 
tnot be accepted. Senior grades should 
(be placed in envelopes plainly marked 
las such and, if possible, should be de- 
livered in person to the office of the 
iRegistrar. 

Grades for all other students are 
due at the Registrar's office one week 
after the date of the final examination. 
All grades should be reported in hon- 
or points and not in percentages. Spec- 
ial care should be taken in indicating 
failures.— "W. S. Hoffman, Registrar. 



RETURN LIBRARY BOOKS 

The Librarian will greatly appreci- 
ate the cooperation of faculty members 
if all books now out of the Library on 
either semester or personal charge may 
be returned before Commencement. 
Many books have been out for several 
years and it is desirable at this time 
that all be returned to the Library. 
Vacation privileges will be granted up- 
on request. — iSabra W. Vought, Li- 
brarian. 

COMMENCEMENT DAY 

EXERCISES CHANGED 

The committee on Commencement 
Day Exercises has recommended and 
the President has approved that par- 
ticipation in the academic procession 
be limited to those members of the fac- 
ulty who are provided with academic 
costume. Over 100 members of the 
faculty already have signified their in- 
tention to be present. When it was 
planned to hold the exercises in the 
Auditorium, as heretofore, it was nec- 
essary to limit faculty participation in 
the academic procession to the seat- 
ing capacity of the platform, which 
is 120; hence invitations were extend- 
ed only to members of the Senate and 
to those of professorial rank. The open 
air exercises now projected will enable 
nearly 140 to be take care Of, and the 
committee urges every member of the 
faculty who is provided with academic 
costume to participate in the process- 
ion. In order that seating arrange- 
ments may be provided, telephone ti.e 
office of Dr. Fletcher of your intention 
to be present. 

(Cards of general admission for 
members of the faculty who will not 
wear academic costume may be ob- 
tained from Mr. Fishburn, assistant to 
the Dean of Men. 

At its meeting on May 30, the Board 
of Trustees approved a recomtmenda- 
tion from this committee that the 
Commencement exercises be held out- 
of-doors, in front of Old Main. Since 
the graduating class numbers over 600 
and the Auditorium seats only 1380, 
but one admission ticket could be sup- 
plied to each graduate, which would 
be very unsatisfactory. The seats in 
the open air theatre and the baseball 
bleachers will be placed in front of the 
terrace, thus providing a seating ca- 
pacity of over 2000. In case of in- 
clement weather, the exercises will be 
held In the Auditorium. 

Order of Processions 

The exercises on Baccalaureate Sun- 
day will be held in the Auditorium. 
Faculty members in academic costume 
will be seated on the platform and in 
seats reserved for them. Faculty mem- 
bers not in academic costume will find 
other seats in the Auditorium. Caps 
will be removed at the invocation and 
resumed at the recession. 

lOn Baccalaureate Sunday, the aca- 
demic procession of faculty members 
and others will assemble at th Q Car- 
negie Library no later than 10:15 a. 



CALENDAR 



FRIDAY, June 12 

Penn State Players, 8:30. Auditor- 
ium. 

SATURDAY, Juue 13 
Alumni Day. Penn State vs. Syra- 
cuse, baseball, 3:00. 
Thespians, 7:15, Auditorium. 

SUNDAY, June 14 
Baccalaureate Sermon by Bishop 
Robert L. Harris, D. D., Marquette, 
Michigan. Auditorium. 

MONDAY, June 15 
Commencement Day. 
Musical Clubs concert, 7:30, Audi- 
torium. 

THURSDAY, June 18 
Fanners' Field Day. 

MONDAY, June 29 
Summer Session begins. 

m. On Commencement Day, faculty 
members in the academic procession 
will assemble in front of McAllister 
Hall at 2:45 p. m. All candidates for 
advanced degrees will assemble on the 
walk immediately north of McAllister 
Hall. 

Seats will be taken on the platform 
»r terrace in order of the procession, 
beginning with the first full row. On- 
ly the chairs for the Chaplain, clergy- 
man or speaker, President, aod deans 
will be placarded. In case of rain on 
either day, the assembling will tako 
place in the Foyer of the Auditorium. 

o 

EVENING ENTERTAINMENTS 

The Penn State Players will pre- 
sent "Seven Keys to Baldpate" on Fri- 
day evening, June 12, at 8:30 in the 
Auditorium, 

The Thespians will give their final 
performance of "Wooden Shoes,' on 
Saturday evening, June 13, at 7:15 in 
the Auditorium 

The Combined Musical Clubs, con- 
sisting of the orchestra, the mandolin 
club, and the glee club, will offer an 
interesting concert program on Mon- 
day evening, June 15, at 7:30 in the 
Auditorium. Tickets will be on sale at 
the Athletic Store on Tuesday and 
Thursday evenings, June 9 and 11, from 
7:00 to 8:00. Price, 50 cents, 75 cents, 
and $1.00. 

o 

PHI KAPPA PHI 

There will be a meeting of the Phi 
Kappa Phi honorary society in the 
Foyer of the Auditorium at 9:00 a. m., 
Monday, June 15, for the initiation of 
new members. A large attendance of 
the membership is requested.— I L. 
Foster, secretary. 

FINAL BULLETIN 

With this issue, the Faculty Bulletin 
Will suspend publication for the sum- 
' mer months. The next issue of the 
Bulletin will be under date of Septem- 
ber 15. 



E ' . W . R U N KLE. 

21 LIBERAL ARTS 



[ ; '; „ ;/ \ F : ? 









Published every Tuesday 
ting the college year as a 
eans of making official an- 
uncements and presenting 
>ms of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 



Con'tri-butions must be ai* 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



3LUME 5 



State College, Pa., September 15, 1925 



NUMBER 1 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



OPENING EXERCISES 

Judge H. Walton Mitchell, presi- 
nt of the Board of Trustees, will 
eside at the opening exercises of 
e College on Wednesday morning, 
iiptember 16, at 10:30 in the Audi- 
rium. All members of the faculty 
e especially asked to attend and to 
cupy seats on the platform. 



-o- 



SENATE TO MEET 

The first meeting of the College 
bnate will take place on Thursday 

ening, September 17, at 7:30 in the 
oyer of the Auditorium, this being 

e third Thursday of the month, the 
ite specified by the By-Laws. 



SCHEDULING OFFICERS 

' Juniors may schedule R. 0. T. C. 
ily by appointment with the Mili- 
ary department. — Col. McLaughlin. 



ENGINEERING FACULTY 

■ There will be a meeting of the fac- 
[lty of the School of Engineering on 
'uesday, September 15, at 7:30 p. m., 
|i Room 200, Engineering D. — R. L. 
'ackett, dean. 



i CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 

A meeting of the faculty of the 
chool of Chemistry and Physics will 
ie held on Wednesday, September 16, 
It 4:30, in the Physics Lecture room. 
-G. C. Chandlee, secretary. 



-o- 



COUNCIL MEETINGS 

i The Council of Administration will 
iaeet regularly throughout the college 
r ear at 10:00 a. m. each Monday in 
he President's office. Persons having 
business for consideration of the 
Council at any time are asked to pre- 
sent the same to the Registrar before 
!;he time of meeting each Monday 
norning. 



FROM PRESIDENT THOMAS 

'I wish to express to all members 
ff the Faculty my earnest and heart- 
felt gratitude for their loyal support 
knd generous co-operation during my 
,ervice at The Pennsylvania State 
College. No one could have been 
created more kindly than you have 
;reated me. You have given me the 
nspirr.tion of looking to me for lead- 
ership, yet you have preserved your 
ndependent judgment, and I have 
profited much from your counsel. 

"You will carry on the great service 
'f the College and some of you will 
ee the realization of the greater 
lopes which we have been working 



out together in the past four years. I 
ask for my successor the same un- 
stinted devotion to the College which 
you have given while I have been your 
President, and no man could ask for 
more." 

JOHN M. THOMAS. 



EXCUSED FROM CLASS 

The LaVie photographers will begin 
taking individual photographs of the 
members of the Junior class on Mon- 
day, September 21. Following the 
practice of former years, instructors 
should accept appointment cards as 
an excuse from class for a fifteen- 
minute period. — A. R. Warnock, dean 
of men. 

HEADS GRADUATE SCHOOL 

In the absence of Dean F. D. Kern, 
who is on a year's leave of absence, 
Dean Holbrook will be acting-dean of 
the Graduate School for the coming 
year. Dean Kern is at the University 
of Porto Rico. 

Until further notice the office hours 
of the acting-dean will be 1:30 to 3:00 
p. m., at Dean Kern's office in the 
Botany Building. All Graduate School 
business should be taken up with 
Dean Holbrook at Dean Kern's office 
and not at Dean Holbrook's office in 
the New Mining Building. 



DEPARTMENT HEADS 

All Heads of Departments are re- 
quested to advise the Bulletin Editor, 
175 Old Main, of all changes in their 
departmental staffs so that the Bulle 
tin mailing list can be revised. This 
information should be given in wr 
ing and should include the name and 
office of all new members as well a; 
the names of all who are no longer on 
the faculty. 



lis 
it- 
nd 



USE THE BULLETIN 

The Faculty Bulletin is the official 
medium for making announcements 
to the faculty. Its columns are open 
for all notices or items that will be of 
general interest. Such contributions 
should reach the Editor, 175 Main 
Building, by Friday afternoon of each 
week to insure their publication the 
following Tuesday. Important last- 
minute notices will be accepted until 
11:00 a. m. each Saturday. 

o 

PROFESSOR WALKER HONORED 

Colonel Elton D. Walker, head of 
the Civil Engineering department, 
was elected president of the Pennsyl- 
vania Department of the Reserve 
Officers' Association of the United 
States at the annual convention held 
in Ilarrisburg this summer. There 
are six chapters of the association in 
this state. 



CALENDAR 

TUESDAY, September 15 



Registration. 
Engineering 
200, Eng. D. 



faculty, 7:30, Room 



WEDNESDAY, September 16 

Opening convocation, 10:30 Audito- 
rium. 

Chemistry and Physics faculty, 
4:30, Physics Lecture room. 

THURSDAY, September 17 

College Senate, 7:30, Foyer. 
SUNDAY, September 20 

Chapel speaker — Dr. George W. 
Richards, president of the Theological 
Seminary of the Reformed Church, 
Lancaster, Pa. 

MONDAY, September 21 

Council meeting, 10:00 a. m., Presi- 
dent's office. 

ADMINISTRATION COMMITTEE 

Following the resignation of Presi- 
dent Thomas in June, the Board of 
Trustees, at a meeting held on June 
13, adopted the following report of 
the Committee on College Administra- 
tion pending the selection of a new 
president : 

"That an Administration Commit- 
tee be created consisting of the three 
senior deans, Messrs. Watts, Sackett 
and Stoddart, and the President of 
the Board of Trustees, as ex-officio 
chairman of the committee; 

"That the Comptroller of the Col- 
lege shall be executive secretary to 
the committee; 

"That during the interim from Sep- 
tember 1st next until a new President 
of the College is duly elected, and 
during any prolonged absence of 
President Thomas prior to September 
1st, the Administration Committee 
shall, under the direction of the 
Board of Trustees, have authority to 
decide all matters of educational 
policy and discipline: 

"That all routine administration 
not involving educational policy and 
discipline shall be disposed of by the 
executive secretary under the direc- 
tion of the ex-Oj/icio chairman. 

It was also voted that Mr. R. H. 
Smith be elected secretary pro tem- 
pore of the Board of Trustees to take 
effect September 1st, or upon the 
resignation of the present secretary 
prior to that date. 



DEPARTMENT TRANSFERRED 

By trustee action, the Department 
of Rural Education has been trans- 
ferred to the administration of the 
School of Agriculture instead of the 
School of Education. 



££ALEIFCAA 3CTvriO UK*H P.. I CHMONH 
ttDTJSLXiiafcX i N F I R V. A R Y 

1* 



5akx W/ l/<rvvJU^ 




ublished every Tuesday 
ing the college year as a 
ins of making official an- 
ncements and presenting 
is of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Con'tritoutions must be a» 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



LUME 5 



State College, Pa., September 22, 1925 



NUMBER 2 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 



INSTRUCTORS' SCHEDULES 

Hach member of the teaching staff 
isked to send to the College Sched- 
lg Officer, 474 Main Building, a 
y of his actual schedule, indicating 
room-number and building — in 
ich he is located at any given time. 
1 E. Bullinger. 



OFFICE HOURS 

)ffice hours for the College Sched- 
ag Officer for the first semester 
1 be as follows : Monday, Wednes- 
Thursday and Saturday, 8:00 to 
00 a. m. The office is in Room 474 
|,in Building. — C. E. Bullinger. 



PERSONNEL OF COUNCIL 

The personnel of the Council of 
ministration is as follows: Comp- 
t Her Smith; Deans Ray, WarnocK, 
\itts, Wendt, Chambers, Sackett, 
fciddart, and Holbrook; and Regis- 
t r Hoffman, secretary. 



STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

3uring the past week, the following 
i! dents have left college: 

I 

[ 
i 

t 
1 
I 
[ 
[ 
[ 



Abt, Herbert, Chem. 
Amato, T. J., Ed. 
Clokey, J. D., AL. 
Colehower, D. W., IE. 
Harris, J. E., CF. 
Hocker, H. S., CHE. 
Lewis, F. H., AL. 
Neuman, G. K., Ed. 
Smith, H. F., Ed. 
Van Nostwick, J. W., LA. 



SENATE COMMITTEES 

The following standing committees 
(!the College Senate were recom- 
inded by the Committee on Commit- 
Iks and -were accepted b; the Ser.ati 
tj last week's meeting : ( 

Mdmiss\on — Hoffman, chairman; 
. landel, Kocher, Loomis. 
Athletics — Holbrooke, chairman; 
iizdek, Ham, Keller, A. E. Martin. 
Student Welfare — Bre;;sler, chair- 
fen; Miss Ray, Warnock, Walker, 
IcFarland. 

Publications — Wood, chairman; 
iss Simmons, Shaw, Cressweli, 
irkinson. 

[Academic Standards — Dutcher, 
'[.airman; Kinsloe, Runkle, Mar- 
iiardt. 

Course cf Study — Stoddart, chair- 
;an; Chambers, P. B. Breneman, 
prland, Bonine. 

IResearcJ. — E. B. Forbes, chairman; 
j'endt, Heckler, Hasek, C. Emory 
liyers. 

\InstructiOn in Science — Chandlee, 
iiairman; Dusham, Hill, Honess, 0. 
I. Smith. 



Commencement Program — War- 
nock, chairman; W. S. Dye, Chedsey, 
Shattuck, Miss Chace; the Secretary 
of the Alumni Association and the 
President of the Senior Class, ex 
officio. 

STUDENT DISMISSALS 

Students have sometimes remained 
at college for several weeks after the 
opening of the second semester only 
to find that they were to be dismissed 
from college. This is unjust to the 
student and to his parents. In order 
to ensure that reports to the Presi- 
dent's office are made promptly, the 
following action has been taken by 
the Committee on Administration: 

"A recommendation that a student 
is to be dismissed from college must 
reach the President's office not later 
than three weeks after the last sched- 
uled examination period of that se- 
mester or of the Summer Session." 

There is a rule of the college that 
"all grades at the end of any semes- 
ter are due at the offices of the Deans 
and of the Registrar one week after 
the date of the examination; or in 
case there is no examination, one 
week after the last meeting of the 
class." It is important that instruct- 
ors should observe the rule in order 
that full information should be pres- 
ent when any case is considered and 
so that reports of those doing unsatis- 
factory work may reach the Presi- 
dent's office within three weeks after 
the last examination. This applies 
to either semester and to the Summer 
Session. 



COLLEGE APPLES 

From September 21 to November 
21, between the hours of 4:00 and 
6:00 p. m., daily except Sunday, there 
will be a salesman at the fruit pack- 
ing house on the college orchard farm 
for the selling of apples grown by the 
college. Prices range from $1.25 to 
$2.50 per bushel, with culls at fifty 
cents. Purchasers are advised to 
bring their own baskets. Varieties 
now ready are Summer Ranibo and 
Mcintosh. Week of September 28. — 
Grimes Golden, Jonathan, King. Win- 
ter varieties, Stayman, Baldwin and 
York, will not be ready until October. 



PROF. BLASINGAME HONORED 

Professor R. U. Blasingame, head 
of the Department of Farm Machin- 
ery, was chosen chairman of the 
committee on farm power at the na- 
tional convention of the American 
Society of Agricultural Engineers in 
Madison, Wisconsin, during the sum- 
mer. This is one of the most import- 
ant chairmanships the society has to 
offer. Professor Blasingame is also 
chairman of the North Atlantic Sec- 
tion of the American Society of Agri- 
cultural Engineers. 



CALENDAR 



SATURDAY, September 26 

Football, Penn State vs. Lebanon 
Valley, 2:30, New Beaver. 



SUNDAY, September 27 

Chapel Speaker — Dr. Milton G. 
Evans, President of Crozer Theolog- 
ical Seminary, Chester, Pa. 



ENROLLMENT FIGURES 

Registration figures up to 10:00 a. 
m. on Friday, September 18, have 
been announced by the Registrar and 
show an enrollment for the present 
semester of 3436, including graduate 
students, specials and two-year agri- 
cultural students. Engineering leads 
as in the past, with Liberal Arts sec- 
ond and Agriculture third. 

The enrollment by schools is as fol- 
lows: 

Engineering 1110 

Liberal Arts 752 

Agriculture 543 

Education 429 

Chem. & Phys. 312 

Mines & Met. 154 

Graduate 70 

Specials 54 

Probation 12 



3436 
By classes, the enrollment is as fol- 
i'ollows : 

Senior 520 

Junior 750 

Sophomore 1006 

Freshman 978 

Special 54 

Two-yr. Ag. 46 

Graduate 70 



3436 



GET ATHLETIC TICKETS 

Members of the faculty end admin- 
istrative staff are this week receiving- 
complimentary pass-books to athletic 
contests through the offices of the 
cleans. This is a courtesy annually 
extended by the Athletic Association 
and the Bulletin wishes to express the 
thanks of the faculty to the Associa- 
tion for the kindness. 



OPENING EXERCISES CHANGED 
The opening convocation of the col- 
lege was held at 11:30 on Friday 
morning last week instead of at 10:30 
on Wednesday as originally scheduled. 
The change was due to the inability 
of Judge Mitchell to be present on 
Wednesday, and the Council action 
came too late to be announced in last 
week's bulletin. 



FIRST FOOTBALL GAME 

Penn State will open the football 
season on Saturday, September 26, 
with Lebanon Valley as the opposing 
eleven. The game will start at 2:30. 



AHvaan- 
• i k D n o a • m v a e v s 



i Published every Tuesday 
tiring the college year as a 
leans of making official an- 
!ouncements and presenting 
ems of interest to the faculty. 



The Pennsylvania State College 

FACULTY BULLETIN 



Contributions must be a» 
brief as possible, and reach 
G. W. Sullivan, Bulletin Edi- 
tor, 175 Main Building, not lat- 
er than 11 a. m. each Saturday. 



OLUME 5 



State College, Pa., September 29, 1925 



NUMBER 3 



OFFICIAL NOTICES 

STUDENTS WITHDRAW 

During the past week the following 
i judents have left college : 

1 3 Croll, M. C, HE. 

3 Daubert, G. J., CE. 
12 Heiple, U. M., IE. 

! 3 Hollobaugh, S. S., IEd. 

4 Kotanchik, W., EE. 



STUDENT AUTOS 

In enforcing the college regulation 
garding student automobiles, I 
ive set Monday, September 28, as 
ie time when all student-owned cars 
tall have disappeared. This regula- 
on is generally thought to be a wise 
id necessary rule, and therefore I 
lall be glad to have the co-operation 
' the faculty to the extent of inform- 
g me of violations of the rule. — A. 
. Warnock, dean of men. 



REPORT ABSENCES 

The attention of all instructors is 
Idled to the Senate regulation requir- 
g the reporting of all students who 
! ive been absent from classes for a 
mod of two weeks to the office of 
ie Registrar. This does not refer 

those who withdraw regularly and 
hose names are printed in the Fac- 
|ty Bulletin.— W. S. Hoffman. 



DEPARTMENT HEADS 

| Blanks for information regarding 
!ial examinations to be given for the 
rat semester were sent to all heads 
'departments by the College Sched- 
:ing Officer on September 24. He 
paid like them to be returned not 
iter than October 3. Note: Final 
icaminations are to be scheduled for 
,1 classes including seniors. — C. E. 
iullinger. 



SENATE MEMBERSHIP 

i The personnel of the College Senate 
|>r this year is as follows: 
; General Administrative Officers — 
|. H. Smith, Comptroller; A. R. 
jfarnock, Dean of Men; Miss Char- 
jtte E. Ray, Dean of Women; Hugo 
lezdek, Physical Education; Clenard 
i.cLaughlin, Military Science and 
tactics; E. B. Forbes, Director, Insti- 
;ite of Animal Nutrition ; W. S. Hoff- 
man, Registrar and Secretary of the 
jenate; J. P. Ritenour, College Physi- 
ian; M. S. McDowell, Director of 
jgricultural Extension; Miss Sabra 
; r . Vought, Librarian; and C. E. Mar- 
jiardt, College Examiner. 
I School of Agriculture — R. L. Watts, 
tan; F. L. Bentley, R. U. Blasin- 
|vme, A. A. Borland, E. H. Dusham, 
I A. Dutcher, J. A. Ferguson, S. W. 



Fletcher, F. D. Gardner, J. B. Hill, 
H. C. Knandel, H. G. Parkinson, R. G. 
Bressler (elected), C. F. Noll (elect- 
ed), C. Emory Myers (elected). 

School of Chemistry and Physics — 
G. L. Wendt, dean; G. C. Ohandlee, 
W. R. Ham, A. J. Currier (elected), 

D. C. Duncan (elected), 0. F. Smith 
(elected). 

School of Education — W. G. Cham- 
bers, dean; D. A. Anderson, Miss 
Edith P. Chace, G. R. Green, W. P. 
Loomis, B. W. Dailey (elected), J. E. 
DeCamp (elected), Miss S. M. Wil- 
son (elected). 

School of Engineering — R. L. Sack- 
ett, dean; P. B. Breneman, F. G. 
Hechler, J. O. Keller, C. L. Kinsloe, 
A. L. Kocher, E. D. Walker, A. J. 
Wood, C. L. Harris (elected), H. B. 
Shattuck (elected), F. M. Torrence 
(elected). 

School of the Liberal Arts—C. W. 
Stoddart, dean; 0. F. Boucke, W. D. 
Crockett, I. L. Foster, R. W. Grant, 

A. E. Martin, F. L. Pattee, E. W. 
Runkle, Miss L. V. T. Simmons, C. 
C. Wagner, W. S. Dye, Jr., (elected), 
C. W. Hasek (elected), J. Tanger 
(elected). 

School of Mines and Metallurgy — 

E. A. Holbrook, dean; C. A. Bonine, 
W. R. Chedsey, D. F. McFarland, J. 

B. Shaw, P. B. Bucky (elected), A. P. 
Honess (elected), 0. A. Knight 
(elected). 

MEAT FOR SALE 

Continuing the practice of former 
years, the Animal Husb